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Groco In-line Ball Valves
$21.30In Stock
Groco Bronze In-Line Ball Valve, Seacock attachment
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Groco In-line Ball Valves Customer Questions and Answers

4 of 4 Questions

Question

This valve has a brass ball, how much of an electrolysis problem will this valve be?

Asked on 12/28/2011 by wally mallett

Top Answer

Zero if you keep your zincs up to date

Answered on 12/29/2011 by WILLIAM ADAMS
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Answer

ironically, i just read a very complete article on this yesterday !! it is in the Jan/ Feb 2012 (brand new) issue of WoodenBoat magazine... the article is titled " SEACOCKS", and it begins on page 24... they talk about "de-zincification " of brass components... which i was unaware of till i read this article.... i will be checking my valve frequently !! pete s.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by PETER SNIECKUS

Answer

Wally, I am not a marine professional, just another idiot outfitting his boat, haha! I can't say whether this valve will be more of a problem than the ones I took out (electrolysis was not the reason I replaced them,) but I will add that I plan to bond all of the metal thruhulls/valves. Once they are all properly bonded to a ground I can't see why they would be more of a problem than a valve with a stainless ball? Hope that helps you out. Fair winds and following seas, Andre

Answered on 12/29/2011 by ANDREA DELENA

Answer

The ball is Highly polished and appears to be stainless or chrome over brass. I have not had a problem with this product. Steve P.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by STEVE PHILLIPS

Answer

My new ones haven't experienced any sticking of freezing closed. . .and some on the boat are going on 8 years old and work fine. . .these have been around for years, I'm sure an electrolysis problem would have surfaced by now ;)

Answered on 12/28/2011 by STEVEN MINNICH II
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Question

does the valve have a drain plug?

Asked on 11/10/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes

Answered on 11/10/2015 by HERBERT ROBERTS
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Answer

Yes it does.

Answered on 11/11/2015 by PETER MAYE

Answer

Yes, the valve has a drain, pictured on the lower right in the catalog photo. It has switchable stops so it can be closed from either swing of the handle depending upon the required fit. If you are using this valve with a through hull, one might consider using the Groco Flange Adapter which mounts inside the hull to accept the NPS Through Hull pipe and has NPT threading to accomodate the valve. Thus when it's time to change the valve, one need not tamper at all with the through hull.

Answered on 11/10/2015 by CHARLES GRAHAM

Answer

I don't think so, but I am not positive. I use it for the fuel line and don't want to have a drain valve to possibly introduce air in the diesel fuel line. There are cheaper ball valves out there, but this one is supposed to not leak air, which is critical in a fuel line. I am happy with it so far.

Answered on 11/12/2015 by PO CHANG
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Question

The "handle" just broke off the seacock which is below the sinks in the galley. Although sort of "green", the boat is a 43' 1991 Hunter sailboat, the rest of the fitting through the hull appears solid. Do I have to replace the entire thru-hull and seacock or can I just replace the valve? Thanks.

Asked on 01/15/2012 by Skip Lucas

Top Answer

Groco inline ball valves is the heading of this request which is what I believe the question is asked about. However from the sound of things you have a seacock thru hull which is where the handle broke off from. Most of the time it is possible to replace the handlle if there has been no damage to where it attaches to the seacock. If you inspect the seacock and find that you cannot repair or replace the handle then you will probably need to replace the entire unit. On my and many other boats I find that seacocks have been replaced two part through hull fittings that have a threaded end where a threaded inline ball valve with handle can be connected as a two part system with the added advantage of being able to unscrew the ball valve if the handle breaks or malfunctions. This makes it possible to replave the valve easily with out hauling the boat out of the water for repairs. As a safety precaution I also always have a tapered wooden plug attached to the whole assembly with a short lanyard for plugging the hole to be close by in case there is ever any chance of having the valve break away by corrosion or accident. As far as cost goes I think that although there are two pieces of hardware involved they can be installed for less than most seacocks. Another preventitive measure is to ground all of the metallic fittings to help prevent corrosion. You need to consult a qualified marine electrician to be sure of doing this correctly however, which could prevent this from ever happening again in the future... Vincent

Answered on 01/18/2012 by VINCENT MCNAMARA
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Answer

Skip, A difficult question without seeing what you have. If it is a seacock the valve is integral with the fitting and the whole thing will have to be replaced. If it is a through-hull fitting with a nipple and ball valve, you can replace the nipple (if not integral to the through hull) and ball valve if the rest if the fitting is solid. Make sure you use a bronze (not brass) nipple. Usually by the time you unscrew the valve it will be ovbious if the through-hull fitting is solid. Since it is below the waterline, if in doubt replace the whole thing. Wayne

Answered on 01/28/2012 by WAYNE ROBERTS

Answer

Sorry, that is 1/4" X 1" wood screws.

Answered on 01/18/2012 by SIMON CAPSTICK

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Hi Skip, if you can get it off, you could just replace the valve. These things are usually very hard to get off if they are old, as they corrode. One potential problem is that by trying to remove the valve, you may break the seal between the through-hull and the hull, i.e. if you turn the through hull by torquing hard on the valve, it will not longer be watertight. Of course, this has to be with the boat out of the water, as once you remove the valve you have no way of stopping water from coming in, fast! I had to replace the engine intake through-hull on my boat, and no way was I getting that valve off any other way than cutting it off with a Dremel tool. I ended up opting for the clever Groco flange with a triangular base. I put three quarter inch by 1 inch wood screws through the flange into the 1/2-inch thick backing plate, after screwing it down onto the new Groco through-hull (this was allowed to set up first for 24 hours with fast-cure 5200, and someone held pliers inside the through-hull on the outside of the boat while I did this, to stop it from turning) and onto a little sealant on the backing plate. Once the screws were in place, I could install the Groco valve without any worry of turning the through-hull, and if in the future I need to replace the valve (again, out of the water!) I won't have to worry about breaking the seal on the through hull! Hope this helps, Simon

Answered on 01/18/2012 by SIMON CAPSTICK
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Question

Is this valve ok for both seawater and fuel?

Asked on 10/04/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

As the tech notes state: &quot;’¢?¥Ë_UL Listed for fuel applications. (Note: ABYC H33.9.2 states fuel valves must have independent means of support. Groco Full-Flow Fuel Valves are the best option for compliance.).) ’¢?¥Ë_Fits IBVF for Seacock Application The IBV series is ok for a non commercial application. If your operating a commercially operated vessel, I would use the FV series. I.E., If you need to meet the regulatory compliance of a commercial application such as a coast guard licensed vessel carrying more that 6 passengers or an non certified 6-pak charter operation you'll need to use an ABYC approved valve such as the FV series and the appropriate grade of hose for your application found here. < a href=&quot;http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/document.do?docId=1133&quot; target=&quot;_blank&quot;>http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/document.do?docId=1133< /a>

Answered on 10/04/2014 by TROY NASH
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Answer

Seawater is what I use them for. I would ask Groco if the seals are suitable for gasoline or diesel.

Answered on 10/05/2014 by GUY HALL

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I use it for diesel fuel, but I would think that it is OK for seawater also. Normally, one would use a seacock for seawater for mechanical strength. Groco has seacocks, but I think they are more expensive.

Answered on 10/06/2014 by PO CHANG
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