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Interlux Interstain Wood Filler Stain
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Interlux Interstain Wood Filler Stain Pint
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Interlux Interstain Wood Filler Stain Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 14 Questions

Question

can product be used to achieve chris craft king plank yellow stain color?

Asked on 07/09/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I purchased Brown Mahogany filler stain. It certainly would not be suitable for staining to a yellow color. Other than that the product is excellant when applied as directed. Larry Murray

Answered on 07/20/2011 by LAWRENCE MURRAY
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If you are looking for C C 50s vintage King Plank use Cris Craft Cordova Stain 749 from Sandusky paints. Trust me I used the Golden Stain from Sandusky paint on my Holiday and it was the sick yellow color I found out that it was for the interior of some of the CC Cruisers. I striped it back off and put Cordova on and it looks great and matches the original .As far as I know Interlux does not make it.Hope this helps you out. Brian Bettinger

Answered on 07/17/2011 by BRIAN BETTINGER

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I do not believe the Interlux has the king plank yellow you ask about - I have all three colors and their brown mahogany will be too dark. However, the Chris Craft Antique Boat Club forum has an entry that indicates "Sandusky Filler Stains Cordova is a golden yellow stain used on Chris Craft Continental, Capri, and Riviera king planks." as advertised by Sandusky. I cannot speak to the result as I am restoring an all mahogany 1959 35 ft Chris Connie and using the Interlux 573 CC red from Jamestown. Which ever stain you end up with I can speak to the overall process that I have had success with for the mahogany and teak work on the Chris. Sand, stain, allow stain to dry out 4 days to a week, apply 1 coat CPES carefully, quickly, minimal brush strokes, so as not redistribute the stain (that's why I wait up to a week to let the stain dry), then apply second coat CPES within 24 hours based on temperature (no sanding in between) followed by first coat of Epifanes thinned 20% within 24-48 hours of the second coat of CPES, again based on temperature and no sanding in between. You will now have a very robust adhesion system. I am using the Epifanes wood finish gloss for first 6 coats, 2 coats on with no sanding and max 48 hrs between coats for warm weather, dry 2 weeks, 2 more coats, dry 2 weeks, etc. then 6 more coats of Epifanes Gloss Clear varnish sanding between each coat for a total of 12 coats of Epifanes over 2 coats of CPES - all available from Jamestown. I do the same with the teak foredeck. I also like both the round Epifanes and the full badger hair brush available here. Keep them hanging in mineral spirits with minimal cleaning after each use - they will last years. Also, you can't beat the 3M gold stikit sandpaper and the small stikit block roll kit. Best Regards, Jeff Hansen

Answered on 07/16/2011 by JEFFREY HANSEN

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Sandusky 749 (Cordova) is what you need for that.

Answered on 07/15/2011 by DAVE PARKER

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natural filler stain with tinting from minwax golden oak stain

Answered on 07/16/2011 by RICHARD HAMILTON

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I did not use this product on a Chris Craft, but it was the color I wanted to achieve, it is a red color so I doupt it would work for yellow.

Answered on 07/16/2011 by BRUCE HURST

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To get the light color on the king plank, you must bleach with a bleaching agent after sanding. Varnish will then make it a honey colored finish. The product that I used (Interlux--Interstain - Wood Filler Stain--Chris Craft Mahagony) could be used on the field for a contrasting color--also works well on hull and transom.

Answered on 07/16/2011 by HAROLD MATHIESEN

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This a very thick stain about the consistency of thick latex paint. I did not use the can I purchased as I originally intended as the color did not match as well as I had hoped. I have used some of the stain mixed with another color on some other small projects. I did not have any complaints about the product although I did not give it a major test. All of the Interlux products I have used have given me good results.

Answered on 07/16/2011 by DAVID JOHNSON

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I have only used the Interlux ’¢?? #573 C.C. Red Mahogany Wood Filler Stain. The way I us it is: The woodwork was painted with the grain with Interlux ’¢?? #573 C.C. Red Mahogany Wood Filler Stain that had been thinned 50% by volume. After the stain had set-up for approximately 5 minutes the excess was rubbed off against the grain with a cotton towel. After the stain had dried for 24 hours it was rubbed down with a Green (Medium) 3M Scotch-Brite Pad. The panel was then painted with six coats of Interlux - #95 - Goldspar Varnish. Before the last coat was applied, the previous coats were lightly block sanded with 220-grit sandpaper, and then everything was vacuumed and wiped-down with a tack-rag and paint thinner. Tom Kenny

Answered on 07/15/2011 by TOM KENNY

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I think a natural colored filler stain may be used. Not chris craft, not brown mahagony, not red mahagony, but natural. To be sure, go to www.danenbergboatworks.com or chris craft antique boat club site and search. Good luck.

Answered on 07/18/2011 by JOHN CLAIRE
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Question

Can Interlux Wood Filler Stain be tinted darker, and how?

Asked on 08/31/2015 by Tom Holdorf

Top Answer

Yes, I mixed the red and brown mahogany stains to get the color that I was looking for while restoring a 1941 Barrelback Chris. I also used Smith's Penetrating epoxy prior to applying the stain. Dan Danenberg is a great source for this.

Answered on 09/02/2015 by FRERERICK MARTIN
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Thanks Gregory!

Answered on 09/07/2015 by Tom Holdorf

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yes I usually put some wood filler in an small plastic container then add some interlux stain and some 333 thinning agent and mix thoroughly.

Answered on 09/01/2015 by RICHARD DE BOER

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Hi Tom, I found the info on the stain. It is the W.D. Lockwood & Co. They make wood stain powder. I hope this helps. Make sure it is compatible with filler stain. Call them, they are very helpful. Let me know how it goes. good luck

Answered on 09/06/2015 by GREGORY PAGE

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I need to get down to my shop to look at the dye I used. I'll try to get back to you in a few days. Greg

Answered on 09/02/2015 by GREGORY PAGE

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Hi Gregory. Thanks for the info. That would be great if you could send me some info on the wood stain dyes. I'm not hung up on Interlux, but was told it is the best. I for sure need to darken whatever red mahagony filler stain I use. Tom

Answered on 09/02/2015 by Tom Holdorf

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I did indeed purchase Interlux wood filler stain, but ended up using a different product. I suppose you could experiment with some dyes to make the Interlux darker. If you are interested, I can send you some info on wood stain dyes. Feel free to contact me.

Answered on 09/01/2015 by GREGORY PAGE

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The only way I know you can change the color is to mix another Interlux Wood Filler Stain of a different color. Perhaps mix a little bit of a darker colored stain with the brown. You could experiment with different proportions until you found a suitable color. I mixed the Chris Craft Mahogany stain with this Brown stain because I want to mute the redness of the Mahogany. This worked very well for me.

Answered on 09/01/2015 by WILLIAM J CONLEY
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Question

I am building a small rowboat from a kit by Chesapeake Light Craft of Annapolis, MD. I have modified the plans to include more mahogany trim on the outwales and inwales and on the seats. However, the seats themselves are made of Baltic Beech plywood. I tried a Minwax red mahogany stain on a sample of the plywood and the result was very, very dark. I am looking at two alternatives for the stain: one is a Minwax oil-based stain (Colonial Maple looks as close to the natural mahogany that I have on the boat); the other option is your Brown Mahogany Wood Filler Stain. I have looked at your color charts on the internet, but cannot determine how dark/light the brown mahogany stain is. Can you tell me how dark it would be on light plywood? Can you also tell me if the Minwax oil-based stain would work under the Interlux Interprime Wood Sealer? Thank you. Jim Van Laningham j

Asked on 08/09/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

How dark is dark? Walnut dark or?? The Interlux filler stain is fairly dark (Not quite walnut however) And it has the red in it. Look at pictures of post war Chris Crafts (Sportsman, Continental Etc) from the '50's and '60's ) that's the color you will get when put over mahogany. I'm not sure about Minwax products but, if you are putting oil based over oil based it should not be a problem.

Answered on 08/09/2012 by COZ PASSALACQUA
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Baltic birch or Baltic beech? Either way, I would always do a sample. Stain on birch can be quite blotchy (beech less so). One can lessen that effect by first brushing on a 4:1 or 5:1 alcohol thinned shellac onto the raw wood. Then stain. For the gentleman's racer runabout I constructed, I used Chris Craft red. It is very red, as were those years of Chris Craft boats. It works fine with the sealer. Be sure to let the stain set for several days before attempting to apply the sealer, otherwise it may lift or dilute into the sealer, interacting with the sealer solvents. Also, thin the sealer to drive it into the wood bit more.

Answered on 08/10/2012 by DEAN WILSON

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I did get some of the wood filler stain last year. I didn't get the brushing liquid, as it was very expensive to ship. I thinned it with some other stuff. It is going to cover the wood with a red color, and you will lose any grain that might be there. Mine is a nice red mahogany color, and it does fill in wood imperfections, but it is solid. I don't recall getting to choose between brown and red. Maybe you are getting a different color than I ordered. Steve

Answered on 08/09/2012 by STEVE CASSELLS

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I used this stain filler, I liked the product, I think the minwax will be fine underneath, but if it is already too dark, this product will not lighten it up. I was staining stripped and sanded Mahogany... you can see the color on my blog. add http and blogspot 1956runaboutrebuild good luck Donovan

Answered on 08/09/2012 by DONOVAN NORTON

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I would suggest you test different stains and stain blends on small offcuts. There is really no way to tell for sure otherwise, and you may need to mix different stains to achieve the result you want. This product is a paste stain for staining the mahogany wood and filling its pores. Baltic birch is relatively nonporous compared to mahogany, the two woods will always look somewhat different regardless of color.

Answered on 08/09/2012 by KEVIN LEINER

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Foerget the minwax products altogether. Pick up the phone and talk to a Customer service Rep. at Jamestown Distributors. If you want it to look it's best - these people are the professionals-the best in the business! I restored a 1958 Dunphy and EVERYTHING they recommended, that I use worked perfectly. Products met and exceeded my expectation. Stop trying to do it yourself --- ask the pros

Answered on 08/09/2012 by JAMES RIEGE
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Question

I tried to use a Minwax red mahogany oil based stain on Baltic beech plywood and got a very dark maroon result. Would the interlux brown mahogany stain on Baltic Beech plywood give me a color that is closer to unstained varnished mahogany? Jim V.

Asked on 08/09/2012 by Jim Van Laningham

Top Answer

In my opinion, on a boat, there is no substitute for the "real" wood. Due to the way it is made, plywood is the most difficult product to match colors with stains. There are many different species of mahogany, from around the world. In fact, I think the term mahogany is almost generic. I use this stain on a Classic Chris Craft which has had pieces replaced over the years, some by folks that knew what they were doing and some that did not. Unstained varnished mahogany varies in color from a light brown to a darker brown, depending on its country of origin and the age of the tree. Therefore, applying a stain, which has a consistent shade, becomes a challenge. The Chris has some original factory stain left, which I have preserved, over the years it has changed tones, now that is a light tone of reddish brown. That's what I try to match. The way I do that is by applying light coats of this stain, with a rag, letting it set up for 10 to 15 minutes, depending on the temperature, then rubbing it off. Most time it takes several applications and rubbings to get it to match the surrounding wood color, it's all by eye. It takes work but when it's done it looks great.

Answered on 08/10/2012 by Lee Urbani
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Yes, I think it would. The thing is the Interlux filler stain has pigment like paint in it, so it only gets so dark and no more, unlike minwax which is more like ink than paint.

Answered on 08/10/2012 by JOHN STAX

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I am not familiar with this type of plywood however, I would recomend this stain for your desired results. This stain comes as a paste, not a liquid so by using a thinner you can mix the product to your desired color and consistency. For best results, I recomend applying with a fine steel wool, light coats, staying with the grain, until desired results are achieved. By using this method, you are filling in any surface imperfections while enhancing the grain pattern in the wood as well as buffing the surface at the same time. Hope this was helpful and good luck. J.T.

Answered on 08/09/2012 by JEFFREY THOMAS

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You will probably get the same result.

Answered on 08/09/2012 by JWHEATON ENTERPRISES

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Not sure what the brown would do. I use the red to get the Chris Craft color. The Minwax Red mahogany doesn't give a true color. I have used the brown in the past on Mahogany to get the brown color on my 1970 Chris Craft, That worked well. Not sure what Beech will look like when stained. Regards, Bob

Answered on 08/10/2012 by ROBERT MARCINKEWICZ

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Jim, I am not sure. However, google Don Dannenburg's website. He wrote two books on old boat restoration and he has a whole chapter on varnishing and stain. His Forum is free and there is alot of godd info available. Best of luck. Sparty On!!

Answered on 08/10/2012 by PETE OQUIST
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Question

I used a similar product on a Century Resorter restoration back in 1990. The filler stain was thick enough to apply with a brush but then I rubbed it in with a cloth to spread and help fill the porous wood. Is this method still appropriate and effective for the Interlux filler stain to cover and fill properly? What is your best way to apply? (Am doing a small project, a 1' x 3' mahogany board to be a pedestal for a model ship). Alan H

Asked on 01/09/2012 by Alan Hurd

Top Answer

The method described is correct but be sure to follow the manufacturers instructions for thinning. Use the cloth to remove excess stain after the stain has dried slightly. There should be a haze on the surface. Remove the excess by working clean sections of cloth across the grain being careful to leave the solids in the pores of the wood. Depending on the final finish pay attention to that manufacture's finish thinning rates. One main brand recommends 50% dilution for the first coat. This allows the varnish to penetrate and seal much better than straight varnish. BUT be careful because over-brushing will soften and remove the built up stain particles in the grain. Good luck with your project.

Answered on 01/10/2012 by ROBERT CHAN
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Hi Alan, I use the chris~Craft filler stain. First mix the filler stain gently but well so it is a uniform cinsistency and then take out the amount you think you will need. You can apply it either with a brush or a rag. I usually use a brush unless I am touching up a little area. Let it soak in for awhile and then gently wipe off with rags until you get the desired color. I always like to take just enough off so the grain can be seen. And you can always do a second application if you go too far in the wiping process. Then several coats of a good varnish will give it the magical depth and glow you are looking for. Dr. William Schmidt

Answered on 01/10/2012 by WILLIAM SCHMIDT

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Alan, brush it on fairly thick and rub it off with burlap, if you can find it, if not with a rough terry cloth. Wait till it turns hazy and rub hard rick

Answered on 01/12/2012 by RICK FLAX

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Yes your method is correct. product must be thinned down. follow directions on can. wait overnight before applying urethane. Three coats should be enough.

Answered on 02/09/2012 by HARRY AYSCOUGH

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Thanks for the info. Will do!

Answered on 01/27/2012 by Alan Hurd

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Thank you Harry. Will be doing project shortly. I appreciate the input.

Answered on 02/10/2012 by Alan Hurd
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Question

Can I seal the plywood with epoxy or a clear sealer after staining and befor varnishing. The plywood is 1/8th. door skin, non marine.?

Asked on 10/19/2011 by William Richards

Top Answer

My application was to apply varnish over the wood filler stain which I also considered a sealer. I believe you can varnish over epoxy, however, note that the instructions on the filler recommend avoiding epoxy (full strength resin) over the filler/stain. I did experience the "lifting" they mention so this stuff really does need to be completely dry before over coating.

Answered on 10/20/2011 by CLAYTON HENKE
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Yes and yes. Just make certain you don't have excessive amounts of stain, that it is wiped to exactly what you want and let it dry thoroughly before charging on. WRS

Answered on 10/19/2011 by WILLIAM SCHMIDT

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William, you certainly can apply a clear sealer after staining your plywood with Interlux Interstain. It's best to allow the stain/filler to completely cure first. I have applied CPES (Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer) over well cured stain with good success. The sealer prevents moisture from affecting the stained wood at the surface which often causes varnish to separate from the wood. The sealer also serves as a great primer for the first layer of varnish. Al

Answered on 10/19/2011 by AL BENTON

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Absolutely and it is imperative you use a non mineral spirits sealer as your varnish, assuming you are using a good spar varnish such as Epifanes, is mineral spirits based just like the Interlux. What happens is the varnish will soften and start smearing the stain resulting in a blotchy looking stain color. I would recommend either Smiths CPES (Clear Penetrating epoxy sealer), which is two part, or Pettits 2018 which is used right from can and is one part and stores better than CPES after you mix it. I've had good results from both. Good Luck, Jon

Answered on 10/19/2011 by JON K WALTERS

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Yes, you can. Do the following- Stain, let dry for 24 hrs. Then seal- let dry completely, then varnish. I don't normally do the sealing step-it's a waste of time. The sealing doesn't give you the depth of color-it clouds the finish. I stain, then varnish. This is a matter of opinion.

Answered on 10/19/2011 by DONALD SINCLAIR

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I just refinished marine plywood with the filler stain, then clear sealer (2 coats) then multiple coats of varnish with the first coat thinned 25%. The varnish was Interlux Schooner. Everything worked out great

Answered on 10/19/2011 by RICHARD ROSSELLI
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Question

How many pints of filler stain would I need for a 17' century resorter?

Asked on 04/28/2014 by John Schimpke

Top Answer

A single pint should be more than enough.

Answered on 04/29/2014 by ROBERT ORR JR
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I used not even an entire pint on both sides of a new Mahogany front door six feet tall. Otherwise, I'm sorry to not be able to comment on your question. I will say however, that I loved this product, as it has a deep rich tone, and was very effective when used as they suggest.

Answered on 04/29/2014 by LESLIE HINTON

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One should be great plenty.I did my 18' Glen- L gentleman's cruiser using 2/3 pint.

Answered on 04/28/2014 by DEAN WILSON

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Looking at some Google images, it seems to be a similar size and layout to my 18 foot Chris Craft Riviera. So, one pint would be more than enough. By two or three times. You will have plenty.

Answered on 04/29/2014 by GREG TRICKEY

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One should be great plenty.I did my 18' Glen- L gentleman's cruiser using 2/3 pint.

Answered on 04/28/2014 by DEAN WILSON
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Question

I have a cutlas chris craft that have been stained before, Can I stained over it or I have to remove the old stain first?

Asked on 02/22/2013 by Juan Carlos Torres

Top Answer

I am refurbishing a 1948 Chris Craft. I have stripped all the bright work to bare wood using a heat gun and scraper. I then removed all elements of previous staining material and miscellaneous varnish. To make the bare wood more consitant in color (especially new bungs) I applied a two part bleach followed by the new stain, wood filler and finally 8 to 10 coats of varnsh.

Answered on 02/23/2013 by JAMES ZIMMER
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I would say that if you want it to look decent you will have to go back to bare wood

Answered on 02/22/2013 by BRUCE HURST

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To do any stain job right you should sand down to bare wood before re-staining. One would presume that there was a sealer like varnish applied over the previously stained surface? If so, the stain won't penetrate through that. Sanding to bare wood will allow the new stain to penetrate the wood grain more fully. Putting new stain over the old will result in a darker color overall and a blotchy appearance in areas where the old stain is lighter or non existent.

Answered on 02/22/2013 by JOHN HEIMAN

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In my opinion attempting to remove old stain on anything other than a very small area would be a very big job. In any event after all these years the is basically no chance of the bare wood being of a consistent shade anyway. The best way to use this product is to wipe in on with a rag let it set up for a while and then rub it off until you achieve a close matching shade. The darker you want the finish the longer you need to it to dry before and wipe it off gently, rub harder for a light shade. If you look at any vintage Chris Craft you will see color variations in the wood finish, that's part of the charm. An old friend of mine once told me "if it looks great from the dock when it goes by, you got it right".

Answered on 02/22/2013 by Lee Urbani

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I don't see a problem with that approach but, check the Interlux website regarding Interstain.

Answered on 02/22/2013 by JWHEATON ENTERPRISES
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Question

What is the difference between the 573 Cris Craft Red Mahogony and the 579 Red Mahogony? Is one more of a Dark Red?

Asked on 04/06/2016 by richard jenny

Top Answer

The 573 is the proper color for Chris-Craft boats. It used to be called XP573. The name has changed, but the color is the same.

Answered on 04/26/2016 by KATHY LAPOINTE
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My guess is, it depends on the year the boat was produced. And WHO is commentating as the oficial word! My take is the color that pleases you Is the a correct color? And who produces it, could be a tossup. Look at as many boats as you can for color, and you will find that that is the number of OFFICAL COLORS that there is. In any event all the top stain producers make good stuff, find the one YOU like and have at it.

Answered on 04/06/2016 by MOSES LAFOUNTAINE

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We have 42 brown Mahogany and 1579 red Mahogany which we use to stain veneer panels for woodie automobiles. We found the 1579 red mahogany to be too red for our use and the brown mahogany just right. Am not familiar with the 573 Cris Craft red.

Answered on 04/06/2016 by THOMAS KLINE
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Question

I have a 57 Chris Craft. Will this fill the cracks between the planks?

Asked on 06/08/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

No, I don't think this is what you want for that. It will help fill tiny variations in the grain and reduce the number of varnish coats before you'll get a level gloss, but it's not really designed for large gaps.

Answered on 06/08/2015 by CHRISTOPHER NAUTA
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I do not think this product is made for filling gaps between planks. This is a heavy body stain designed to fill the open grain of Mahogany and other open grained woods. This allows the finished layers of varnish to lay flat and smooth and not sink into the open grain of the mahogany. The gaps between planks are too wide and deep for this product. I would talk to customer service at J. D. and tell them what you are wanting to do. They should be able to tell you what product to use for this. Ask them if one of the polyurethane caulks by 3M or Sika would be suitable for this. John M

Answered on 06/10/2015 by JOHN MCCOWN

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My Chris-Craft is a 1949. There are no cracks between the planks on my boat. The planks are five inches wide on the deck. Each plank has three sawn groves about a eighth of an inch wide. When the planks are butted against each other and fastened to the supporting deck beams underneath, they look like planks 1 5/8 inch wide with an eighth inch white stripe or line between each of the planks. I use Pettit boot top white paint and mask the white lines. That is done after the deck is sanded smooth, stained with the Interlux Wood Filler stain, and then several coats of Pettit 2056 Varnish applied, hand sanded with 220 sandpaper between coats. It sounds like you may be wanting to fill the sawn grooves up to the level of the thickness of the plank and not have white lines at all. If that is the case, I would use wood filler, like putty, rather than the filler stain. The stain will easily fill the grain in the mahogany but eighth inch grooves are much larger than the grain. Let the wood filler harden, sand everything well, add the Wood Filler stain, and proceed as described above. I hope that helps.

Answered on 06/08/2015 by ROBERT ORR JR
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