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Fiberglass Biaxial Cloth Tape - 6 inches Wide
$40.05Limited Stock
Fiberglass Biaxial Cloth Tape - 6 inches Wide
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Fiberglass Biaxial Cloth Tape - 6 inches Wide Customer Questions and Answers

6 of 6 Questions

Question

Does the mat part go down or the stitch part, or does it make a difference? Thanks, Russ

Asked on 04/10/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Usually the mat part would go down first.

Answered on 04/10/2014 by TIM MOORE
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Answer

I'll agree with Robert W. I'd always just used stitched side down, out of habit, and hadn't considered stitched side up. Robert makes a valid point. Jim

Answered on 04/10/2014 by JIM SIMONS

Answer

Structurally, it shouldn't make a significant difference. However, I'd suggest the stitched side should be down, if will be covering it with more fabric, and are concerned with good adhesion. The stitched side should be up, if you are concerned with a fair surface, which will not be covered with another layer of fabric. Hope this helps, Jim

Answered on 04/10/2014 by JIM SIMONS

Answer

Please be aware I'm not an expert and have just used this product once. Having said that, as I understood the mat job is to provide bulk for rigidity, not strength. The woven side should face out. There is a number of excellent how-to videos and tutorials available online on the topic of FRP fabrication. Hope this helps,

Answered on 04/10/2014 by ELDAD ZEIRA

Answer

Mat side down/stitch side up. The other way can end up in a real mess as the mat will clump while you are trying to get the biax to wet out.

Answered on 04/10/2014 by Robert White
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Question

I need to build up 1/4 inch of solid glass. How many layers of this will it take?

Asked on 01/08/2017 by Jim Mcdaniel

Top Answer

I think 5 to 8 layers

Answered on 01/09/2017 by MERLE THOMPSON
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Answer

Very informative. Thanks!

Answered on 01/09/2017 by Jim Mcdaniel

Answer

With the pox he probably 2 to 3 layers

Answered on 01/09/2017 by FRANK BOCCIA

Answer

Find the manufacturer's product specification page for your biax at the Jamestown website. It will indicate the thickness you can expect to get from one ply of the material. You will also find the resin to fabric ratio which you should use as a guideline for how much resin to expect to use. That will help you determine how much to work the fabric and resin so that you don't end up too resin rich. There will probably be specs for both vacuum bagging and non-bagged lay-ups. Divide your quarter inch final thickness by the thickness per ply to determine the total number of plies required. If you're laying up without vacuum bagging, you can expect to have some excess resin in the lay up and you will use fewer plies than you calculated - maybe just 70-80%. On this chance, I usually leave the last few plies marked out but not cut out until I know that I need them so that I don't waste any material. Good luck.

Answered on 01/09/2017 by PAUL MATHEWS
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Question

Which side goes down on the 1708mat, the stitch side or the mat side or does it make a difference?

Asked on 02/22/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

depends on the finish mat out for sanding and smooth finish, mat in for better bonding such as in bilges in boats.

Answered on 02/23/2014 by WARREN DENNY
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Answer

If we're talking about sheathing wood with it, I would apply it with the woven side down, so that the long fibers lie across the joints wherever possible. The idea is to reinforce seams in construction from flexing & breaking apart, so keep this in mind when using. Good luck!

Answered on 02/22/2014 by DAVID RIGGS

Answer

My understanding you would use the matting to add bulk therefore it should be the sandwich layer. Google and you'll see many instruction videos on YouTube please don't rely on my advice alone I'm not a pro. Hope this helps.

Answered on 02/23/2014 by ELDAD ZEIRA

Answer

I was taught to put the mat side down. gary

Answered on 02/22/2014 by GARY RATHKE
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Question

can you use this with epoxy ?

Asked on 06/03/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Heavy duty and I bought to repair tabbing I used with mas epoxy take time and material to saturate cloth make sure it has the translucent look to it to know it has full saturation again this is a heavy cloth

Answered on 06/03/2015 by Cheryl Hirsch
See More Answers (2)

Answer

Yes, absolutely, that is the intended purpose.

Answered on 06/03/2015 by L DANIEL PARHAM III

Answer

I have used it with epoxy, suggest read glass and epoxy manufacturers instructions before use.

Answered on 06/03/2015 by ELDAD ZEIRA
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Question

Is there a sewed edge on the biaxial tape like the is in the standard e glass cloth tape?

Asked on 11/10/2019 by Dan from Falmouth, ME

Top Answer

Yes

Answered on 11/12/2019 by Matthew
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Question

Do you have Biaxial Cloth more than twelve inches wide? Asking: Reynold Belmar

Asked on 05/12/2015 by Reynold Belmar

Top Answer

Sorry I haven't used it yet

Answered on 05/12/2015 by MARTIN FLYNN
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