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$58.63 Limited Stock
WEST System Carbon Fiber Tape
$58.63Limited Stock
carbon fiber tape, carbon fibre cloth tape
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WEST System Carbon Fiber Tape Customer Questions and Answers

4 of 4 Questions

Question

once the carbon tape is applied , can I also add an adhesive to the tape for aditional strength?

Asked on 11/03/2011 by Bill D.

Top Answer

It's not tape like duct tape is tape. It's carbon fiber weaved in narrow strips and needs epoxy along with it to work.

Answered on 11/04/2011 by GARY BLECK
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Answer

Bill, I used West Epoxy resin to adhere the carbon fiber tape to the wood pieces for extra strength in the vertical direction. Jay Graham Amityville NY

Answered on 11/03/2011 by JAY GRAHAM

Answer

I employed carbon tape quite extensively in the restoration of a 1974 sail boat (laminated wood). The tape has been applied with epoxy west system as by instructions of the manual. Easy to handle and strong; I felt no need to apply any other adhesive. The boat has been used for raising since 2008, and I had no evidence od any problem. Maurizio Brunori, Rome

Answered on 11/04/2011 by WILLIAM A. EATON

Answer

Yes you can, but you have to prepare the tape for secondary bonding, if the epoxy is hardened

Answered on 11/04/2011 by SAMI SROUR

Answer

Hello Bill, By adhesive, do you mean an epoxy resin? If so, this is a necessary part of the process. Also, to the best of my knowledge the term 'tape' refers to the dimension of the carbon fiber and not a self-sdhesive quality. You may also want to check if the tape is uni or bi-directional in weave. The weave, along with fiber density and with of tape will determine tensile strength. Hope this is helpful, Dale

Answered on 11/03/2011 by DALE CLIFFORD

Answer

Bill, We used epozy to adher the carbon fiber tape to the wood giving both wood and epoxy more tensile strength. In our case 1300 lbs of pull from harpe strings. Jim

Answered on 11/07/2011 by JAMES MUMPER
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Question

I plan to use the carbon fiber tape on each side of a thin fiberglass shelf that is under load, and currently has a crack in it. I plan to use epoxy to hold the carbon fiber in place, does carbon fiber get along well if covered under and over by epoxy?

Asked on 05/20/2013 by tc frank

Top Answer

Yes but it is thick so plan on having a large lump it does not fold well

Answered on 05/20/2013 by MIKE GRIFFIN
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Answer

Yes, epoxy, such as West System epoxy is perfect for carbon fiber tape. You should sand your fiberglass shelf where your carbon fiber will be added to get a good bond to the fiberglass structure.

Answered on 05/21/2013 by Steven Szarawarski

Answer

Yes, that is an excellent application for carbon fiber. Epoxy will bond carbon and fiberglass (properly prepared).

Answered on 05/21/2013 by WALTER SLOMINSKI
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Question

Will this material adhere to a Red Hi Temp Silicon Seal application @ 600 degree ?

Asked on 03/29/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

This is a technical question. Probably the only way to answer it is to try it. My suspicion is that the epoxy binding material will burn up well before you get to 600C.

Answered on 03/31/2012 by PETER SALMON
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Answer

I have no experience with Red Hi Temp Silicon so I can't help you. Hopefully others can.

Answered on 03/31/2012 by CARL SPINTI

Answer

Sorry, we haven't had any experience using this with hi temp bonding

Answered on 03/31/2012 by WESTLAKE YACHTS
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Question

i have to redo the stringers in the bottom of a 1981 Gibson 36 foot houseboat. what product do you recommend to use? I herd you guys had the best stuff for the job

Asked on 01/19/2015 by Hunter Ziegler

Top Answer

If you are looking to re-tab the stringers I'd recommend a fiberglass tape in a width wide enough to cover the stringer and the hull a few inches depending on the size of the stringer. Your best bet for strength would be to use 3 layers of a thinner cloth/mat than trying to do it in one big lay up. The thinner material is easier to work with as far as making the corners, and once layed up will be as strong if not stronger than a thicker single layer.

Answered on 01/19/2015 by Rick White
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