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Fiberglass Biaxial Cloth Tape - 4 inches Wide
$25.45In Stock
Fiberglass Biaxial Cloth Tape - 4 inches Wide
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Fiberglass Biaxial Cloth Tape - 4 inches Wide Customer Questions and Answers

5 of 5 Questions

Question

I used biaxial tape for my first homebuilt boat. The tape had strands of what I think was cotton thread to hold it together. The threads left high ridges that were nearly impossible to get rid of other than substantial filler over the joint. Is there a type of biax tape that does not have this?

Asked on 05/06/2015 by Sandy Milliken

Top Answer

I used this tape extensively in the building of a 19' wood-epoxy boat. I did not have the thread problem you mention, but the tape is relatively thick and you must use care to fully saturate it with resin. You can eliminate a lot of sanding with careful use of release fabric, but for a fully finished surface you will still need to use filler, especially at the edges of the tape. Hope this is helpful.

Answered on 05/06/2015 by DONALD STOVER
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Answer

Thanks, Donald. Other than those pesky threads, it is thinner than the "regular" woven tape that I have also used. Easy to fully saturate, but frayed a lt at the edges. Haven't tried release fabric before, will investigate.

Answered on 05/06/2015 by Sandy Milliken

Answer

I have not experienced this issue. Difference may be that I vacuum bagged in my application. Not a smooth finish but that is because of the thickness of the tape and the amount of resin required. I never attempted to finish or smooth in this application. Later this week I am using this tape to build up (bond) the hull and deck joint on a vintage FG Viking 33. I may opt to only peel ply and not vacuum bag the joint. I need it somewhat smooth to reduce labor sanding and finishing. My guess is that peel ply should help smooth down this tape.

Answered on 05/06/2015 by RICHARD POTCOVA

Answer

I have not seen a biaxial glass that does not have that weave of thread. I just had the exact same happen on some supports I did,I sanded it as good as I could,then gelcoated it,sanded it again and gelcoated once more and it was fine. you could do filler as well.but I'm not a big fan of fillers.Its quite possible that there is a tape that doesnt have those threads.or possibly a better quality tape might have a tighter sewing? Good luck.

Answered on 05/07/2015 by STEVEN VASSALLO

Answer

If properly laid, the small thread that holds it together should not have caused any issues. And when laying glass by hand, there always seems like theres one strand that sticks out from a cut (any cloth) that just doesn't lay right and you have to grind before the next layer. I used this Biaxial tape you referred to with no issues. Built an entire console out of it and was really happy with it.

Answered on 05/06/2015 by TOBIN STRICKLAND

Answer

I don't think you put enough resin on it when you applied it.

Answered on 05/06/2015 by GERALD CONNER

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I believe the one for a final coat you looking for is not a biaxial type tape. It is a chopped strand tape. That is the one used for a "less evident," final look.

Answered on 05/06/2015 by ANDREY ALPEYEV
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Question

I need some 3-4 oz fiberglass strips to edge the hatches on a strip-wood kayak I'm making. I've bought fiberglass tape before that has a hard ridge on the edges. Will any of this tape work, or should I just get cloth and trim the edges? Thanks

Asked on 07/13/2012 by Will Nettles

Top Answer

3-4 oz fiberglass cloth is pretty thin, generally the thicker the cloth the more likely it is to leave an edge. But even with a thick cloth there is some practice involved oozing it around in the resin to make the edge as smooth as possible. It is messy and starts to cure faster than you think (get hard), go through the extra effort to practice on something else. Biaxial has a different weave and reacts differently to manipulation, the threads along the edges have a different trim. Experiment with regular and biaxial fiberglass weaves to see the nuances, but in short yes, biaxial will work, even if thicker, if you are patient.

Answered on 07/13/2012 by LINDA PROCTOR
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Answer

I found the tape to be much easier to use than cut strips. With the cut strips things quickly turned into a mess of stands that came off and bunched up as I was working the material, while the biaxial strips stayed clean. I did not find the edges of the tape to be hard or behave any different than the middle, so my vote would be the tape.

Answered on 07/13/2012 by EDWARD KREBS

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fiberglas tapr works much better than cutting strips due to the unraveling of the cut pieces. the tape has sewn edges and does not unravel...

Answered on 07/13/2012 by RODGER HANKS

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This is an excellent product... It consists of +/-45 biaxial cloth stitched to CSM. It is ideal for tabbing in bulkheads and very easy to work with compared to woven cloth. As far as I am concerned, there is no raised [woven] edge as with conventional tape. However, this material is much heavier, total weight 25 oz/sq yd, than what you specified. It is more oriented to structural rather than finish work. So, it might not be the right choice for your application.

Answered on 07/14/2012 by ANDREW RITCHIE

Answer

I have used the Biaxil cloth tape with great sucess. I highly reccomend it for your needs. It is thick and structually strong. Use a quality resin and don't over activate it. Hope this helps

Answered on 07/13/2012 by GREGORY VODDE

Answer

the bi-ax is stronger than straight cloth and if you get the tape w/ the matt attached it will adhere better than just cloth. the seamed edge of the tape will make a neater edge ( nice stright line) than cloth cut w/ sissors that will unravel some no matter how neat you try to be. Capt Larry Pentel

Answered on 07/14/2012 by LAURANCE PENTEL
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Question

is it best to wet out surface or cloth first to avoid a bubble going around coaming edge?

Asked on 04/12/2018 by jim from havertown pa

Top Answer

Hi Jim, it doesn't really matter which one you wet out first. You want to apply some resin to where the cloth tape will go, and wet out both sides of the cloth itself before you apply it, then using a roller or spreader, work any air bubbles out of it. If possible, using the vacuum bag method also helps remove any air bubbles or voids if that is a major concern for your project.

Answered on 06/04/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Answer

I have had better results by wetting the surface first, then laying our the dry cloth and finally wetting out the cloth in place. Wetting the cloth first resulted in trapping more air under the cloth. Whereas, if the cloth is dry, the air squeezes out through the weave and doesn't leave bubbles. I am self-taught and don't claim to be an expert. However, all my repairs have withstood the test of time. Best thing is to try different methods and keep a sharp eye out for what works best for you and for your specific repair. I hope this helps. --Peter

Answered on 04/12/2018 by pboyce

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YES! Always better to wet out the cloth before laying down.

Answered on 04/12/2018 by davealijah

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If your working on wrapping stringers wetting it out first then laying it over works best. I like wetting it out first If I'm working with a large piece on a flat service Is the only time I don't wet it out first

Answered on 04/12/2018 by billymiller6

Answer

surface

Answered on 04/12/2018 by braswell.3
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Question

Is this fabric compatible with epoxy resin?

Asked on 06/19/2017 by B.O.B. from Downriver, Michigan

Top Answer

Yes.

Answered on 07/20/2017 by JD Tech Team
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Question

Is this tape made from DBM1208 or DBM 1708. I'm assuming 1708 since it mentions 17oz, but I want to be quite certain. Thanks.

Asked on 04/17/2017 by jackrabbit from Maine

Top Answer

It's 1708 cloth.

Answered on 04/19/2017 by JD Tech Team
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