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S/S Tee Nuts
$2.96Limited Stock
stainless steel tee nuts, ss t nuts.
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S/S Tee Nuts Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 15 Questions

Question

How can one prevent the bolt from coming through the top of the S/S Tee Nut? I am going to use this under a padded panel and do not want the bolt to protrude into the padding?

Asked on 09/05/2013 by David Paek

Top Answer

Thank you for your response. I think your suggestion of a carriage bolt is the way to go. I can counter sink the carriage bolt into the composit and work from there.

Answered on 09/10/2013 by David Paek
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I don't mean to be flip, but you either buy the right length of bolt, or cut a longer one down.

Answered on 09/06/2013 by DAVE MOUNT

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I assume you put the padding on after installation of the Tee nut. I have ground the bolts off flush with a cutting wheel. I have even fiber glassed over the Tee nuts after grinding flush.

Answered on 09/08/2013 by JAMES JOHNSON

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I will be using a threaded shaft through the Tee Nut with the Tee Nut acting like the head of a bolt. Tee Nut will be on top of a board and the threaded shaft will pass through a bulkhead where it will receive the washer and nut. When I tighten the nut, how do I prevent the shaft from turning in the Tee Nut and protruding past the board?

Answered on 09/08/2013 by David Paek

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It's a measuring game; add the length of the thread on the Tee Nut and add the thickness of the materials your bolt shaft is passing thru. Then either buy your bolt(s) to this length or cut down a longer bolt(s) to the desired length. If your cutting down a longer bolt, a little trick so you don't mess up the threads while cutting is to run a nut down the threads before cutting and leave it there while you cut the bolt shaft off. This way after you've made the cut you simply remove the nut and it will open up any messed up threads.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by JOHN KAISER

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Basically you will need a bolt with the length that is equal to the thickness of what the Tee nut is inserted in plus the thickness of what ever the bolt is going through. If you cannot find a bolt that matches the length you need just stack washers under the head of the bolt. If that doesn't work for you, then you will need to hacksaw a bolt to the length you need. Just be sure to thread a nut onto the bolt before you cut it off. When you remove the nut it will straighten the threads where you made the cut. Hope this helps.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by JOHN ERWIN

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I'm not sure I understand the application, but it sounds like you should be using a carriage bolt instead of a T nut and threaded rod, or just run a hex head bolt into the T nut instead of rod with a nut on the other end. I don't understand why you need to use a rod with nuts on both ends. If you must use threaded rod, put a jam nut (a second nut tightened against the first) on the end opposite the T nut to allow you to tighten the rod without moving the other nut.

Answered on 09/08/2013 by DAVE MOUNT

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Select the correct length bolt.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by THOMAS GUERTLER

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All you can do is watch the bolt length. I like to use as long a t-nut length as I can to give more room for the bolt to grab.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by PAUL MCLAUGHLIN

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Er, use a shorter bolt? Or use washers under the bolt-head.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by HARRY JOSEPH
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Question

I need 1/4 in. T nuts for my boat in salt water. Are these S/S T nuts suitable for boats used in Saltwater, above the water line?

Asked on 07/14/2013 by Jake Campbell

Top Answer

I think so......I used them to secure my out board motor brackets on the transom of a boat I intend to use in salt water.

Answered on 07/15/2013 by JAMES JOHNSON
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Answer

Although the stainless steel type was not listed on the tee nuts I purchased, another purchaser who bought a whole box found a 18-8 designation on the box. The 18-8 is a commonly used alternative name for either 301 (correct) or 304 (common misuse) stainless. Traditional "marine grade" stainless is 316. Although 316 has only a little more nickel than 301 or 304 (actually less nickel than some forms of 304), it (316) does have enough molybdenum in it to provide substantially better corrosion resistance. BUT, I looked for 316 tee nuts and could not find them even advertised beyond small, expensive amounts in small sizes. As is so often the case, the best available hardware at a reasonable price was at Jamestown. I put a coat of Tef-Gel on the screw and over the tee nut. So far, so good.

Answered on 07/15/2013 by BOYD GROTH

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I have never seen another better option. Salt water is a harsh environment, but SS is the superior choice. Recommend same quality stainless screw and using an anti seize thread compound if the screw is going to be removed.

Answered on 07/14/2013 by JIM MCINTYRE

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Yes, they work wonderful in salt water also. We use these for seat upholstery and side panels mostly, Never been an issue.

Answered on 07/25/2013 by PAUL MCLAUGHLIN

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Yes

Answered on 07/16/2013 by ATLANTIC SPECIALITIES

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yes

Answered on 07/15/2013 by DANIEL D'ALFONSO

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Yes, I used them on my Tartan 30

Answered on 07/15/2013 by DAN LLEWELLYN

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I think so. They're 18-8, while not as durable as 316 they should be fine if not constantly exposed. FWIW, I've used a bunch of them on my boat's interior. No problems yet...

Answered on 07/15/2013 by SAM BOYLE

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Stainless steel is very good for this. Since Jamestown carries them I would guess that they are made from quality SS, 18-8 or better

Answered on 07/14/2013 by MICHAEL ALLURED

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stainless steel nuts and bolts will eventually corrode or rust......have you given any thought to trying brass or bronze?

Answered on 07/15/2013 by PAUL DANILOFF
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Question

Don't mean to sound dumb but is the flange side supposed to show (on the underside of a chair bottom) or just the hole where the bolt goes in? Wish I could find a picture.

Asked on 04/12/2015 by Lil Sponaas

Top Answer

I don't understand how you what you are trying to do. The flange should be on the opposite side of the hole from where the threaded shaft/bolt/rod/whatever enters. This is so that the tension on the threads pulls the flange into the wood and not out of it. So if you have a chair leg with a metal threaded rod for attachment, the flange would go on the top of the chair bottom. If you are attaching similarly equipped back or armrest supports, the flange would go on the bottom of the chair bottom. It you put the flange on the same side as what you are attaching, it will pull the tee nut out. If you need to have a threaded attachment that can be inserted from the same side as the threaded connection rod, you need a threaded insert. I could not find these on the Jamestown website, but if you Google "threaded inserts for wood" plenty will pop up. - If you explain the problem clearly and thoroughly, you might get a better answer. I hope this helps.

Answered on 04/12/2015 by DOUGLAS ACKERMAN
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Drill your hole, insert T-Nut underneath securing with screw from the top! Hope this helps.

Answered on 04/12/2015 by TONY ERLINGER

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The flange goes under the bottom of the substrate you are using to mount to. All you see from the top is a hole in the wood. You can not post pics or links here. Wish you could it would sure be a lot easier to understand.

Answered on 04/12/2015 by MATT TRIMBLE

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the flange goes on inside of the bottom so only the hole is visible after the cushion

Answered on 04/12/2015 by ARCHIE HENSON

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So you are saying... at the top where the foam for the seat is is the hole...where the chair legs are attached is where the flange is? Really feeling dumb!

Answered on 04/12/2015 by Lil Sponaas

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Thanks so much for your help...got it now.

Answered on 04/14/2015 by Lil Sponaas

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The bolt should be screwed in from the non flange side The material you are attaching to should be sandwiched between the flange and the bolt

Answered on 04/14/2015 by ANDREW ELWELL

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The t- nut is located on the inside of the hole. Opposite of the bolt. When tightening the bolt it should pull the t-nut into the hole. Most time you never see the flange when the job is done.

Answered on 04/12/2015 by PAUL MCLAUGHLIN

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I can se why you would be confused. If you are talking about mounting a seat to a pedestal then my description is upside down. I was thinking you were talking about mounting a pedestal to a sole. If you are mounting a seat to a pedestal, then yes the flange will go on the top side of the seat substrate under the foam with the threaded portion of the tee nut extending down into the hole. Then a bolt can be inserted up from the bottom, through the pedestal and threaded into the t nut. Try searching google for "How to install T-nuts." There are many good pictures on woodworking and climbing wall sites showing how they work.

Answered on 04/13/2015 by MATT TRIMBLE
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Question

Can you use it with fiberglass where you cant reach behind it to place a nut?

Asked on 10/16/2014 by John Gatewood

Top Answer

Don't know about use with fiberglass, but it installs on the bolt surface.

Answered on 10/16/2014 by j schwartz
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Answer

I drilled a hole large enough for the major circumference of the tee nut, waxed a long, appropriately sized bolt with the tee nut threaded onto the end inserted it, tee nut first into the hole and then poured epoxy into the hole until the hole was filled. Once the epoxy set I was able to turn the bolt out of the hole and tee nut and reinsert a like-diameter & thread bolt.

Answered on 10/21/2014 by KENNETH BRUNS

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My best guess is NO, not directly on fiberglass. The T Nut is anchored to the back side of the material (usually wood) so that you may insert a machine screw into the top side. The T Nut is tapped in place to anchor it. However, you can draw the anchors up into the wood by placing a washer and then machine screw tight on the top side to secure anchors to wood. Hope this helps.

Answered on 10/16/2014 by TONY ERLINGER

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I imagine you could. Though you would want to minimize the torque you put on the bolt you put into it as you may end up spinning the t-nut and creating a mess on the T-nut side of the fiberglass.

Answered on 10/16/2014 by JOHN OREN

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I don't see why it wouldn't work with fiberglass.

Answered on 10/20/2014 by DANIEL WESTPHAL

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I can't speak to its use in fiberglass generally, but this nut had to be installed from the rear side, so no.

Answered on 10/16/2014 by j schwartz

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You would still have to reach behind to place the Tee nut unless you could place it before you lose access. Don't Know what you're doing and if the fiberglass is too thin the spikes on the Tee nut may cut through.

Answered on 10/16/2014 by ANDREW ELWELL

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If I understand your dilemma, my answer would be "probably not". You still have to reach behind the panel to put the t-nut in place. Also, the prongs on the t-nut will not penetrate fiberglass. Good luck

Answered on 10/17/2014 by EGON DZINTARS

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I do not think it can be used with fiberglas if the fibreglas has already set (the prongs need to get a bite, so it is appropriate for wood or other soft materials). I'm not sure what you mean by "you can't reach behind it to place a nut" -- the Tee nut has to be on the opposite side of the wood from the bolt. So: Tee nut>wood>bolt. NOT: Bolt>Tee nut>wood. Clear as mud, you're welcome.

Answered on 10/16/2014 by MARK EDWARDS
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Question

I am using these to build a climbing wall and was wondering if the coarseness of the threads is an issue? i am using pretty fine thread bolts on these

Asked on 12/14/2014 by tristan bradford

Top Answer

Coarse vs fine thread is a good argument among engineers. Be sure to use compatible (ss) coarse/fine thread bolts. It's also a good idea to use a thread locker (permatex) with ss to prevent gauling (sp?).

Answered on 12/14/2014 by KENNETH BRUNS
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Like any nut, the thread needs to match the thread on the bolt, in both diameter and pitch. Check the specs on the bolts you have and the nuts you are buying.

Answered on 12/14/2014 by MARK MORWOOD

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Tristin, Your threads need to match the bolt you are using. Provided these match you should be ok.

Answered on 12/14/2014 by JOHN OREN

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Standard machine screw or bolt thread should be fine. The bolts on your climbing hardware should be fine provided they are relatively standard and don't require specialty nuts. Take one of your bolts to the local hardware store and try a standard nut/thread if that works you'll be OK

Answered on 12/14/2014 by j schwartz

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The T-nuts have standard 1/4-20 threads. If your bolts are 1/4-28 there will be a problem

Answered on 12/14/2014 by EGON DZINTARS

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I would not use Tee Nuts as an anchor system for a climbing wall. You may want to consider an "anchor type" system rather than a securing system. You need further research. Good Luck

Answered on 12/14/2014 by TONY ERLINGER

Answer

The thread count is listed in the product size which is in the format dd-tt ht 10-24 has 24 TPI 1/4-20 has 20 TPI. This is the same nomenclature that is used for the machine screws or bolts that you would use with the tee nuts

Answered on 12/14/2014 by j schwartz

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I doubt that the use of fine or coarse threads makes much difference as long as the bolts are large enough in diameter. For a climbing wall I'd use a bit of overkill in the bolt size. Of course, the threads of the bolts and nuts must be the same. If you already have bolts, then you can only use nuts with the exact same thread (coarse, fine or other). Pardon me if this seems patronizing; the question isn't very clear.

Answered on 12/14/2014 by DOUGLAS ACKERMAN
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Question

What is the thread count? Can't find it anywhere.

Asked on 05/30/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Depends on the size. Look at the listing i.e.: 10/32, 1/4-20, etc

Answered on 05/30/2013 by ATLANTIC SPECIALITIES
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Its there, right on the drop down menu! It is standard 20 count (threads per inch)

Answered on 05/30/2013 by GLENN NICHOLS

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24 The thread count is the second number. Here the t nut is 1/4" diameter and 24 tpi

Answered on 05/30/2013 by JIM MCINTYRE

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The thread count is listed in the product size which is in the format dd-tt ht 10-24 has 24 TPI 1/4-20 has 20 TPI. This is the same nomenclature that is used for the machine screws or bolts that you would use with the tee nuts.

Answered on 05/31/2013 by BILL KNOPF
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Question

Looking at your picture, the threads don't appear to be full depth. Do the threads meet eng stds? What are the full specs?

Asked on 10/31/2011 by gene baugh

Top Answer

not sure what "full depth" means. The threads are the length on the nut, so longer bolt goes through to the other side.

Answered on 10/31/2011 by GEORGE ALLRED
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The bolts thread all the way through the Tee nut.

Answered on 10/31/2011 by JEFF YOUNG

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I agree that the threads go all the way through the barrel but the depth of the thread as measured across the barrel dia looks light when viewing the picture. Are the threads std. depth as specified by SAE

Answered on 11/01/2011 by gene baugh
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Question

What is the diameter of the base? I've been tee nuts with a 3/4 inch base.

Asked on 09/21/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Unfortunately, the SS t-nuts I got are installed in a boat and I'd have to take up the floorboards to measure them (I used them to anchor the bases for some pedestal seats). However, my memory is that the SS nuts I got looked just like the regular steel ones you buy at the hardware store, I'm guessing they'd be the same diameter. Sorry I can't be of more help.

Answered on 09/22/2011 by DAVE MOUNT
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Tee nut for 1/4 - 20 screw Top of "T" is 3/4 inch across. Pilot hole is 5/16 inch.

Answered on 09/23/2011 by Chuck the builder Chuck the builder

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Wow , this is really cool! I like this feature! But, I'm 1000miles away from my shop right now on a bussiness trip might not be back for 2 weeks. you could try then thanks glenn

Answered on 09/21/2011 by GLENN NICHOLS
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Question

do you know what kind of stainless steel the t-nut are made from for example 304 or 316???

Asked on 06/18/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The box I bought in 2010 is labelled "18-8" stainless steel. I don't know if any changes have been made since then, but I do know that no rust has appeared on the ones I installed on my boat three years ago.

Answered on 06/18/2013 by TERREL THORNTON
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I have no idea what type or that there are different types. I know they worked perfectly for me. I was recovering boat seats that had foam on wood and hinges that needed to be attached.

Answered on 06/19/2013 by Maureen Bradley
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Question

Do you also offer 7/16" T-nuts? Dave Olsen

Asked on 11/16/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

can you get half inch screw on t-nuts

Answered on 02/21/2013 by john lauruhn
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We do not have the 7/16".

Answered on 11/16/2011 by Ryan L
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