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#6 Bronze Wood Screws Flat Head Frearson
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#6 Silicon Bronze Wood Screws Frearson Flat Head
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#6 Bronze Wood Screws Flat Head Frearson Customer Questions and Answers

4 of 4 Questions

Question

I am fastening 1/4 " marine plywood to the wooden frame of my pram using #8 Frearson silicon bronze screws. Should I use a countersink, or do I just predrill with a # 8 bit given the thinness of the plywood?

Asked on 08/03/2014 by Bob Last Name

Top Answer

Bob,great question. Plywood is a special case in that you don't want the screws to protrude, but neither do you want them to sink in below the outer ply. My advice is to try it without countersinking first and see if the screw head will countersink itself. The goal is for the head to be nicely flush with the surface. After a try or two countersink as necessary. My experience is that many plywoods will crush easily and don't need countersinking. Sometimes I countersink just a little to give it some help but let the screw draw itself down the rest of the way. Sorry if this is not a straightforward answer - as is often the case, you just have to establish the goal and adjust your process to get there.

Answered on 08/04/2014 by DAVID ORTH
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Answer

If you countersink, it should be done minimally. I think it gives a better finish and less stress on the wood itself. Just be very carefully not to go deep at all. Good luck. Bruce

Answered on 08/03/2014 by bruceschneider21 b

Answer

My inclination would be to do both - it would eliminate "crushing and splintering" around the screw head..... and reduce the risk of breaking off the screw heads while driving them. I have yet to snap one off. Nice screws me thinks...............

Answered on 08/03/2014 by HAROLD LAVERS

Answer

I would definitively pre-drill with a counter sink as the plywood will split and will not be as strong.

Answered on 08/03/2014 by PETER BATHURST

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That really depends on how you plan on finishing. Even if the frame material is good enough to pull the screw in below the ply, the screw will force small raised edges of ply around the head. This is especially so if you are using the meranti based ply, much less so for okume. The raised ply is not a problem if you are planing to sand and cover with epoxy and glass, but not ideal if finished bright. Why not use a combination drill and countersink bit?

Answered on 08/04/2014 by SHAUN BOARDMAN

Answer

Bob, I used a countersink to get a flush , smooth surface. If you do not use one you will get an irregular surface finish, of course do not go too deep with the countersink.

Answered on 08/11/2014 by LLOYD ROZBORIL

Answer

With Bronze and brass, I always counter sink just to be sure that the screw will not break. In hard woods, I usually drive the same type steel screw first and then remove and drive the softer metal screw. I also like to use a hand driver when feasible so I can feel how the screw is setting in the wood. Having broken many screws and going to the trouble of using a screw extractor and a plug to repair, I try to avoid the problem. Marine plywood can be hard due to the amount of glue that they use in it manufacturing. If you are driving many screws, the process above may cause a timing problem. I have found that the strength of bronze screws can vary, some may break when driven with a drill and some may not. I would experiment with some similar scrap pieces to see what happens and determine what process you want to use. Good luck.

Answered on 08/04/2014 by JOHN ADKINS

Answer

First of all, I think the #8 is probably too large of a screw. A #6 might be better. Regarding the countersink, yes this is necessary. Otherwise the wood around the screw head will be compressed and leave a dimple. The wood could also splinter some. Given the thin plywood I wouldn't drill the countersink deep enough to actually recess the screw head. With just a bit of counter sink the recess can happen with the driving of the screw.

Answered on 08/03/2014 by ROBERT WARD

Answer

I had better luck with a countersink although some screws went in fine without.

Answered on 08/04/2014 by TIM TIGNER

Answer

P.S. You should pre-drill whether you countersink or not. May as well do it all in one step with a countersinking bore.

Answered on 08/04/2014 by HOYT DOW
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Question

Mine is not a marine use, can I drive with phillips bit? Thanks

Asked on 10/21/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

A phillips bit will tear up the screw head, Use a frearson bit

Answered on 10/21/2013 by John Good
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Answer

I recommend that you use a hand powered No. 1 Frearson drive bit since the screw is so small. The phillips bits tend to strip out these small heads since they don't go down into the shaft as deeply as the Frearson bit does. But if the wood is soft, and you use a hand powered small phillips screwdriver, it may work. You won't be able to supply much torque like this, and the angle of the driver to screw has to be perfect for this to work. I would actually recommend that you drive all #6 screws by hand. The impact drivers will strip them if anything is even slightly wrong with your method.

Answered on 10/21/2013 by THOMAS STAKELUM

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Most likely. Look on wikipedia for frearson. Explains exactly the difference. If its not a high torque should be ok.

Answered on 10/21/2013 by NATHAN RUPARD

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These type of screw are not very hard, so if you don't use a frearson bit you are going to wear the head of the screw. I ordered then the frearson bit in my order. Best regards.

Answered on 10/25/2013 by MICHEL PELLETIER

Answer

No, a Philips driver will not fit properly-I tried that myself. They do sell the Frearson drivers; it would be worthwhile getting the drivers. The screws themselves are excellent quality, but bronze is a little soft compared to steel.so you need to use the correct driver.

Answered on 10/21/2013 by RANDY PERSICA

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Does not fit the phills head well and may stirp out the screw head

Answered on 10/22/2013 by noemar noemar

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Yes you can use a Phillips bit, but it does not fit into the slots as far as a Frearson so be carful as it may 'round out'.

Answered on 10/22/2013 by LYN SVENDSEN

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If it is a Frearson screw a Phillips driver will strip the slots. You might be able to coax in one or two without damage, but if you are going to be driving lots you will want to get a set of Frearson screw drivers or bits.

Answered on 10/21/2013 by ROBERT WARD

Answer

A phillips will cam out and ruin the screw during final tightening. Get a frearson bit: one size fits all.

Answered on 10/21/2013 by D. BRUCE STRATTON
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Question

What is the diameter of the widest portion of the head of this screw?

Asked on 04/03/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Go to the WL Fuller web site and they have all this information in a chart. google "standard screw sizes" and the WL Fuller site should pop up.

Answered on 04/03/2015 by ROBERT BROTEN
See More Answers (4)

Answer

Purchase a American Made micrometer, ask any American certified toolmaker to measure the diameter of the screw using the American Made micrometer and you will have your answer to assist the customer. Don't ever waste my time again pulling a stunt like this and wasting my time.

Answered on 04/03/2015 by MR. BLAIR M. PHILLIPS

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I don't actually know. I think that is the part that is #6

Answered on 04/03/2015 by CHARLES DE ARMAS

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why not buy a few and find out

Answered on 04/03/2015 by BRAD KURLANCHEEK

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Sorry, I used them all. My best guess is 1/4 in., but surely the supplier should be able to answer your question.

Answered on 04/03/2015 by TIM TIGNER
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Question

Does ANYONE make a standard hand screwdriver for a Frearson recess? Sometimes called a Red and Prince?

Asked on 04/21/2017 by bubsyouruncle from Chicago

Top Answer

We only carry the Bitts, not a hand screwdriver in Frearson. You will see one for sale on ebay.

Answered on 04/21/2017 by JD Tech Team
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