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#8 Bronze Wood Screws Flat Head Square Drive
$22.92Limited Stock
square drive bronze wood screws #8
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#8 Bronze Wood Screws Flat Head Square Drive Customer Questions and Answers

3 of 3 Questions

Question

Do these screws require a tapered drill bit or straight drill bit?

Asked on 09/15/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

A tapered countersink bit works best but you can drill a pilot hole for the threaded portion and follow that with a larger bit for the shank (both straight bits). Just be sure to use some sort of depth stop so the larger bit doesn't pull itself too deep.

Answered on 09/16/2011 by STEPHEN AMBROSE
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Answer

A tapered drill bit produces pilot holes that match the wood screws root diameter. This will decrease the likelihood of spliting, cracking, warping the material, especially in hardwoods. Using tapered drill bits also ensures that the screw will go in securely. If you use a streight drill bit in hard wood, first run a steel wood screw of the same size and next length shorter to cut the threads in the wood. Use "Akempucky Fastener Lubricant" on the wood screws to keep from breaking the screw as you drive it home. Good luck with your project.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by KEN LINK

Answer

Yes, they certainly do. They will break in hard wood like white oak like I was using, if you take any shortcuts. I suppose in pine or cedar they would be okay, but you are probably using oak, so forget it. While you're at it, I would only recommend the Fuller drills, they're way better than commodity brands that will burn their way through.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by JOHN STAX

Answer

It does not "require" a tapered bit but it is a damm good idea. Cheers, Alan

Answered on 09/15/2011 by Alan Alan

Answer

I successfully used a straight bit, however the screws were only 1" so the penetration may not have been enough to matter. Great screws!

Answered on 09/15/2011 by CHRIS PRUHSMEIER

Answer

Just normal sq bit bests scows to drive

Answered on 09/16/2011 by CRAIG VOGT

Answer

I used a straight drill bit and it worked just fine. I have used both and it does not matter much at all.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by EARL JORDAN

Answer

I like to use a tapered bit. It provides room for the screw close to the head so you prevent splitting what you are trying to fasten while giving holding surface for the threads. Don't forget to set your countersink on the bit before you drill.

Answered on 09/19/2011 by walter bailey

Answer

A tapered drill bit is nice to have. That said, a straight bit works just as well. If you are screwing the #8 screws into hardwood, be sure to spray a little WD40 into the pilot hole before you insert the screw. This reduces the heat build up and helps reduce the possibility of snapping the screw as it is turned into the pilot hole.

Answered on 09/16/2011 by MIKE ELLIOTT

Answer

I think it is best to use a tapered drill bit with a countersink. I think this helps the screw threads grab and hold better. Set the countersink depth for your application and you might want to consider using a stop collar if you are going to drill a lot of holes. The tapered bits tend to pull into the wood and the stop collar helps eliminate guesswork. Have fun!

Answered on 09/16/2011 by DOUG BELL
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Question

does the length (5/8) include the shank only or to the top of the head?

Asked on 05/07/2015 by Arthur Stickley

Top Answer

It's the entire length of the fastener. Total overall length

Answered on 05/07/2015 by MARK MORGEN
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Answer

Hi Arthur - The length includes to the top of the head.

Answered on 05/08/2015 by MIKE NOLAND

Answer

Thanks John

Answered on 05/07/2015 by Arthur Stickley

Answer

It's the total length of the screw.

Answered on 05/07/2015 by Dave Collett-Paule

Answer

Measurements are always from the designed flush surface to the point. So flatheads are from the top of the flat to the point (the whole thing), oval heads are from the rim edge to the point, and round heads are from the bottom (flat) surface to the point.

Answered on 05/07/2015 by John Duncan
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Question

Which Fuller countersink will I use for #8 FH wood screw to install brass flat bar?

Asked on 09/20/2018 by Captain Jeff from Burley, WA

Top Answer

#8 is a C8 countersink 3/8" cutting diameter.

Answered on 10/02/2018 by JD Tech Team
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Answer

I have been using a generic length adjustable all in one: pilot hole, body hole, countersink for a #7-#8 flat head. Dave

Answered on 09/20/2018 by dwhull
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