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WEST System 207 Special Clear Hardener
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WEST System 207 Special Coat Hardeners
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WEST System 207 Special Clear Hardener Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 22 Questions

Question

what do you apply the epoxy with, a brush or sponge?

Asked on 07/02/2011 by Donna Capri

Top Answer

Use a bristle brush that is disposable, like a chip brush, or an acid brush.

Answered on 07/09/2011 by TIM SKOK
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I generally am applying clear hardner over fiberglass. For this, I use a squeegee (hard plastic edge tool) to fill in the figerglas. Pour the epoxy in a puddle on a relatively flat surface and spread it using the squeegee. For small areas, a chip brush is good except you have to watch for bristles. Good Luck, its not as hard as it seems.

Answered on 07/09/2011 by CARL STEINORTH

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Hi Dona - I use a body putty spreader whenever I can. When it comes down to the last coat or 2, I use a brush. I have found that the cheap foam brushes tend to break down aftrer a very short time. I use either "chip" brushes or the black poly brushes - both tend to lose bristles but the black is easier to see and remove. I have not ordered the foam rollers or brushes from West so I can't say if they are better or not. Several articles in Wooden Boat mag. have suggested buying the foam rollers and making your own brushes from pieces of the roller - I never seem to plan that far ahead. Good Luck with your project, Jack

Answered on 07/07/2011 by JOHN MENGES

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I'm looking for a flawless finish with no runs or nubs. I don't mind applying more layers, just want the finish transparent.

Answered on 09/21/2012 by Donna Capri

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I've used both foam rollers and bristle brushes. Foam rollers apply a little less product, leaving a thinner layer of epoxy; bristle brushes have seemed to apply a little thicker layer. Depends on what you're looking for in the end.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by BARRY KAROW

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Our local 'big box' store sells rollers specifically made for applying adhesives. I've been very happy with my results using them, but remember the professional painters trick of cleaning the fluff out of a new roller by rolling it over several lengths of blue painters tape before applying any finish.

Answered on 07/07/2011 by KEN RYAN

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Apply with West System foam roller, then drag with a foam brush to remove air bubbles.

Answered on 07/07/2011 by JOHN JENKINS

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The sponge or foam roller will enable you to quickly apply the epoxy and then thin it out on the work surface so it doesn't set up too quickly. Once the surface has been covered you can continue to roll the epoxy out to a uniform thickness. Mount one or more bright lights around the work surface so you can look or thick areas or drips. Clean thus up with a foam brush. Stop messing with it as soon as it gets tacky. If you keep working it you'll have created a mess that will require a re-do. Of course if you don't like the finish, just sand the whole surface down and do it again. Barry

Answered on 09/21/2012 by BARRY KAROW

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Donna, I haven't used a sponge to apply epoxy but it may work alright if you were applying a very thin layer. I generally use inexpensive (disposable) brushes in job appropriate sizes to apply epoxy. If you are working with large surface areas a plastic squeegee/spreader works well to spread the epoxy around. I often use rollers and foam brushes when working on larger projects such as fiberglassing canoes.

Answered on 07/12/2011 by TOM SHIRLEY

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Hi Donna, I used a brush. I think a foam brush would work as well as long as it is rated for solvents and such. I have not had good luck with Home Depot foam brushes but I would bet Jamestown and West Marine have epoxy rated foam brushes. The cheap way I did it since I do not feel it is reasonable to clean the brush was to get some low price brushes in a pack at the depot, comb them out with a brush comb to rid them of bristles that may come out and toss them after use. Just don't get the chip brushes at the Depot, they shed to much.

Answered on 07/08/2011 by ROBBIN RODDEWIG
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Question

l am a knife maker and l was thinking about making micarda so l would like to know if this product would work because of the clearness of the hardener ?

Asked on 11/18/2014 by Ronald Puett

Top Answer

thanks for your input

Answered on 11/21/2014 by Ronald Puett
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I would like to think each of for your answers, l think this will help me a lot . you guys are the best, ask for a raise l think you deserve one.

Answered on 11/19/2014 by Ronald Puett

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I had to watch a You tube video to see what micarta was. Yes, I think 207 would work great for laminating. I've used it as a clear coat on wood. Unlike other resins, it doesn't cloud up while curing in high humidity conditions. It has little or no UV protection, so it is not suitable for constant exposure to the sun. After about a year of storage, the part B of the resin turns a reddish color, but the mix ends up being only a slight tint of red. hope this helps.

Answered on 11/18/2014 by RANDY PERSICA

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In my experience, this hardener does remain clear, so it should look good for your handles.

Answered on 11/18/2014 by GLENN PALMER

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I would think your best bet would be to try it out on some kind of a throw away sample of your knife making to find out. I would follow the steps involved precisely and subsequently you will know from the sample results for certain.

Answered on 11/18/2014 by CHRISTOPHER CAPOTIS

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I used the 207 on my redwood strip canoe. I used it to adhere fiberglass both on the interior and the exterior. I was very pleased with the results - pic is in latest WoodenBoat mag!!

Answered on 11/18/2014 by MIKE SAILSBERY

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We've had great luck with the 207 hardner. levels nicely, and is crystal clear.

Answered on 11/20/2014 by FRANCIS CASEY

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I had to google Micarta to see what it was. In our application we use this product to strengthen and weatherize wood on vintage automobiles. I can say it does dry very clear on wood.

Answered on 11/18/2014 by SUSAN LITTIN
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Question

We are doing a beer top table for outdoor use and are trying to find a epoxy coating that non yellowing with uv protection that you can flow on for exterior use ? Yes this is a question .Will your product 207, 205 meet this requirement ?

Asked on 09/05/2013 by Nicklas Musgrave

Top Answer

yes- though, it will need to be brushed or rolled on and sanding helps to smooth it out

Answered on 09/12/2013 by Daniel Kazer
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207 cures clear. 205 turns brown the longer it sits around unused. Definitely go with the 207.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by GLENN PALMER

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I don't have enough long term experience to know if these products yellow with time.

Answered on 09/06/2013 by RONALD MORGAN

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No. You will need to cover the epoxy with at least two coats of varnish. We have had best luck with cetol.

Answered on 09/06/2013 by JAMES LEA

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Nicklas: Epoxy, even this one, will not work well for a "flow on" application. With a thick coat, the heat generated by the epoxy's hardening process will likely distort and discolor the surface. There are plastic coatings designed for this type of application, but they are usually not epoxy. HTH al

Answered on 09/05/2013 by ALAN D DONALDSON

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I used the 205/207 system to finish a cherry bathroom countertop that was exposed to normal splashes from a sink. I top-coated it with a gloss polyurethane because the epoxy is relatively soft and would scratch. I would call the manufacturer tech support line directly with your question. I can't advise on your usage question, but I'm sure they can.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by Steve Reynolds

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I used for the surface of a custom outside table. It held up pretty good , until I forgot to protect it from the New England winters. Since then it's been a downhill battle with moisture getting under the epoxy, or moisture getting into it as it dried. The epoxy has worked better than varnish or poly.

Answered on 09/05/2013 by R M HUNGATE
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Question

hello Iam doing a penny floor and it was suggested that I use this product.. was wondering though after opened how long will the product last in its cans?? also how durable is it actually to the people that have used the product?? will it stand up to walking on it (using it in the hall way).. can it be taped off, will the tape easily be removed after drying?? thankss

Asked on 09/19/2012 by jc jufer

Top Answer

Product is still usable in can which was purchased about 2 years ago. I guess you do know that this hardener is to be mixed with another material to create an epoxy which is pretty durable. I can not say for how long as we have since sold the boat, but it was still looking pretty good then. As one normally wears softer sole, non-skid shoes on a boat, I could not predict how long the epoxy would last in a differant enviroment. Never had a need to tape it. This is about the best I can do.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by TOM SCHREEDER
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jc.......we bought the West System 207 hardener and the 105 epoxy resin 2 years ago to use on the mahogany console of a boat restoration project. We also bought the pumper tops that fit on the cans. The following year we used the products again on 4 more pieces of wooden furniture. Today, the product seems to still be fine and would not be afraid to use it again, even being 2 years old. We do keep the products in a storage area where they would not freeze in the winter. We are very satisfied with the protection and durability that the West System gave to our pieces, since they will have to withstand the outdoor elements. Our results seem to be hard-as-nails strong and don't know why you could not use it on the floor. No experience with tape though. Good luck!

Answered on 09/20/2012 by JOHN HOUGHTON

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I've never used this for floors, only for clear-coating wooden canoes, so don't know about durability for foot travel. But it keeps in the can for at least 18 months (I haven't trried longer yet). Try to avoid extremes of temperature during storage. For taping, I would suggest removing before the epoxy sets fully, otherwise any overlap of the tape is likely to cause tearing. Another thought - will this floor be exposed to UV light? If, so, use a good quality UV inhibitor coating over the epoxy, otherwise it will gradually go cloudy. Good luck!

Answered on 09/20/2012 by PETER MACFARLANE

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I've used this product to make cedar strip canoes, using pumps to dispense the 105 and 207. Shelf life has been a year or more, in a closed can with the pump remaining in the can. I can't comment on your other questions of durability or taping. Barry

Answered on 09/20/2012 by BARRY KAROW

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We use the 207 hardner specifically for areas exposed regularly to sunlight in need of UV protection. Varnish repairs. I would be reluctant to leave tape in place on any epoxy aplication.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by FRANCIS CASEY

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the West System is a great epoxy, I use it like many others for boat building, in addition I use it for office desk tops, on raw wood slabs, last for many years and if needed a lite sanding and recoat can be applied no it cannot be taped, the epoxy will adhear the tape to the wood or project. some will varnish over the epoxy, I have done this on older boats, using the epoxy as a saturant, and using a lower cost finish like varnish. but West System Epoxy can be sanded and waxed for a deep finish. I have some West product that is several yeas old, there is a tendency to turn a honey color when its that old but the adhesion and cure is always good. but its a safe bet to use it all right a way for a clear color, they make a special clear finish and you might want to use that for a clear floor.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by JAMES YONKERS
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Question

I am building a western red cedar strip planked rowboat with clear finish using 105/207 When i applied the base coat on bare wood, i was not happy with the finish due to rough spots and contamination. I am thinking of wet sanding this layer and applying another coat before applying the glass fibre. Would this dull the end product in any way? Regards, Omer.

Asked on 08/25/2012 by Omer Ongut

Top Answer

Not being an "expert" on the matter, i would say it shouldn't be a problem as long as you use the same product on the area in question. I have not had the problem sealing my cedar strip canoes. I use 105/207 West System. All the new hardeners are clear. In the past, it had an amber tint to it which gave the wood an awesome look, plus it was easier to tell when the two were mixed properly. The new stuff works well though. Hope this helps ... Maynard

Answered on 09/06/2012 by MAYNARD LAGACE
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Omer, I would NOT wet sand it but use some 60g followed by 100g. Then lay the cloth on and squeegy into place . Follow this with anough coats of 105/207 to overfill the weave of the cloth. Then sand it smooth being careful not to sand through to the cloth itself. There was a good write up in Epoxyworks Magazine by Ted Moores. Find that by contacting West Systems. I'm sure they can get you a copy. Follow it and you fill find sucess.

Answered on 09/06/2012 by PHILIP MITCHELL

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I use 105/207 on Western Red Cedar. I always sand after the first coat to remove the nibs from the wood. I happen to dry sand and I don't try to be perfect about it. After this you can apply a second coat, which will lay flatter than the first coat and completely seal the wood. The sanding dulls the surface but this disappears as soon as a next layer is applied. In my application, I'm not using glass fibre. I'm building a base with 5-6 coats of 205/207 and let cure for a week (longer if cool weather). After that I wet sand so that there is no gloss left (to 150G) and wipe with Interlux 202 to remove any remaining wax. My top coat is 5 coats of Epifants 2-part clear gloss polyurethane sprayed. The finish is water-clear.

Answered on 09/06/2012 by MICHAEL LAUER

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a problem could develop if the surface is not completly dry (free of water) before putting on the second coat of epxoy. If the layer blushes (turns milky in color, water got into the layer somehow. So afer wet sanding, let it sun dry or blow dry for a while.

Answered on 09/06/2012 by R M HUNGATE

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We use west to water proof vintage automobile coach work. While we use Bristol Finish on visible wood I believe the process would be the same. We wet sand every thing visible prior to applying either product. Clean very well prior to application, it will not cloud. The key would be to do a test area on the bottom of the boat. We have a '53 Christ Craft and will be heading down the same path this winter. Good luck!

Answered on 09/06/2012 by SUSAN LITTIN
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Question

I am wanting to coat the bottom of my wooden driftboat. My question is will this product flex as 1) temp changes, 2) going through white water, & 3) when hitting the unavoidable rocks in river.

Asked on 08/03/2018 by John from OR

Top Answer

This epoxy will have some flex properties to it, generally it should flex with the wood, and if it has been prepared properly before applying, you should not have any delimitation issues. If experience an impact of a rock, it will scratch or sometimes chip. This can always be fixed or restored after. There is a possibility that it can delaminate from the wood in that area from a good hard hit, but again it is depending on prior surface preparation and, as well as what the wood type you used.

Answered on 08/03/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Not sure on the rocks, I'd guess it will at least stress it and possibly crack upon impact. It's fairly tough though. Temp changes shouldn't be a problem but direct sun for extended period of time will discolor it. White water would depend on how many rocks you hit... there are aluminum boats that are tough but not as pretty as wood.

Answered on 08/03/2018 by mkaster6borman

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I don't know about flexing due to temp and water pressure but rocks will compress the wood and create gaps that will allow water to enter. Another coat will seat the surface but not repair the dent.

Answered on 08/03/2018 by okaucheecedar

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Hi JohnI have used this product with West System 105 on my canoe. I applied it 2 times on top of the fiberglass I used it is a very nice finish and looks very durable, and for me the importance was to be able to see the wood grain. I haven't finished the canoe yet and have not been able to test it out under mentioned condition in question.Ample information can be found online.

Answered on 08/04/2018 by jkleinen
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Question

what pump to use with .66 pt container ? Thanks, Frank

Asked on 03/28/2016 by Frank Fierro

Top Answer

I have never used a container that small, so I don't know. I expect that if you are buying such a small container that you are also using very small amounts at a time. WEST Systems have a scale for use in this situation.

Answered on 03/28/2016 by BRUCE JOHNSON
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300 mini pump set from west system

Answered on 03/29/2016 by JAKE ROBERTS

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The scale I referred to in my earlier response is the West Systems #320 Small-Batch Epoxy Scale. (< a href="http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=6558" target="_blank">http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=6558< /a>)

Answered on 03/28/2016 by BRUCE JOHNSON

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WEST System 300 Mini Pump Set WSY-300 Cap sizes on the pump set do not allow you to use the wrong pump on the wrong container.

Answered on 03/28/2016 by EILEEN A RICHARD
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Question

Can this product be used for on rock walls?

Asked on 05/04/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

What is &quot;rock walls&quot;? sorry, don't understand your question !

Answered on 05/04/2015 by CHRISTOPHER CAPOTIS
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Do you mean for clearcoating the rock? If you want to do that, there are sealers made specifically to use on things like granite countertops that might be better. If you want to glue the rocks together, then you should probably find a specialty product. Paver adhesive might work.

Answered on 05/04/2015 by GLENN PALMER

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I would think so. It stays clear and doesn't yellow.

Answered on 05/04/2015 by MICHAEL WAGNER

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This works great on wood, not sure about rock. As it is a glue it is possible. You would need to ask the manufacturer.

Answered on 05/04/2015 by SUSAN LITTIN
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Question

How long does 207 hardner take to cure? In inside room tempeture.

Asked on 01/24/2015 by Ken Stoll

Top Answer

Not exactly sure. I tend to work on boats in the evening, so it is almost 24 hours between applications. Always seems to have hardened within 24 hours.

Answered on 01/25/2015 by GLENN PALMER
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It's been several years since I used it on my canoe but as I remember about 24 hrs to touch - I think directions say about 30 days to fully cured.

Answered on 01/25/2015 by MIKE SAILSBERY

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It takes longer than 205; my policy with epoxy, any kind, is to let cure overnight, the longer the better !

Answered on 02/14/2015 by CHRISTOPHER CAPOTIS

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Curing times for epoxy vary depending on material temperature, room temperature, humidity and additives no matter what hardener you are using. 205 is quicker then 206 and 209. But then again the actual curing time is dependent on several variables. The warmer the better. Quoting from the Gougeon Brothers book on boat construction page 33, "Coatings of West Systems epoxy should be sufficiently cured for subsequent operations after 12 to 24 hours-usually overnight." The West System User Manual page 3 describes methods of controlling cure times. I have found these recommendations to be very helpful. You can access this via the internet site for West System if you didn't receive one with your epoxy resin. My experience with 207 hardener has been curing times of 4 to 6 hours indoors with the materials all being room temperature above 70F to overnight outdoors with the temps being in the 45F to 50F ranges. I suggest a trial batch to see what you get. Hope this helps and best of luck.

Answered on 01/25/2015 by MICHAEL ABERNETHY
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Question

when gluing teak wood together would it be better to use the 207 hardener from west?

Asked on 02/26/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

This is a clear drying hardener, but will yellow in long term storage of 1 yr. for light woods it is great, for dark woods like Mahogeny it makes no difference, so if your teak is aged and its a repair, use std hardener, but new use the clear 207 the natural oils in teak hinder to some degree the strength of cured epoxy, clean the edges to be glued with a solvent

Answered on 02/27/2013 by JAMES YONKERS
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The word better implies that you are asking if using 207 hardener would be better than some alternative. My question is "better than what?" In my opinion, using 205 or 206 would generally be better options as they are less expensive and thicken more readily. Since all but the very surface of the glue joint is protected from UV rays and clarity is not likely an issue, I can think of no reason to recomend the 207 for your application.

Answered on 02/27/2013 by MARC ORNSTEIN

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I've never used on to glue Teak. If you read the info sheet it is for coating things more than gluing. I'd stick to the slow set hardener. Paul

Answered on 02/28/2013 by PAUL MILLER

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My experience is using 207 for clear-coating cedar canoes, not for gluing as such. However, I'm not sure why you would use the more expensive formula for a job that does not require it's main property - clarity. It also has a fairly slow cure, so you would have to clamp for longer. My suggestion would be 205 for a quicker cure (but - disclaimer - I've never glued teak).

Answered on 02/27/2013 by PETER MACFARLANE
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