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Fiberglass Cloth - 6 Ounce Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 36 Questions

Question

Hello, I want to build subwoofer box for my car in a cheapest way. What kind of cloth and resin will you recommend? Thank you.

Asked on 04/23/2012 by James Carter

Top Answer

Thank you. I was looking at 6 oz cloth. Can I put 3 layers of cloth at the same time, one on top of next one?

Answered on 04/24/2012 by James Carter
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Use 10z style 7500 as it's an open weave and very conformable with a reasonable build up rate. Use any polyester resin from Jamestown.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by TED WARREN

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Fiberglass will be the box, b.c it's not enough space down there for MDF box. I hope 3 layers will be enough, then I put fatmat on the inside of the box.

Answered on 04/25/2012 by James Carter

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Thank you.

Answered on 04/24/2012 by James Carter

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i'd use the six ounce cloth, you don't need the thicker stuff. i use system 3 epoxy resin for my boat projects, but since you don't need extreme durability, you could use polyester resin, if you like. either should give you plenty of strength.

Answered on 04/24/2012 by DAVID WILSON

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I wish. I can't use any of the trunk space on my 2011 Suburban, b.c it's a working vehicle. The only option for me is a little compartment in the trunk, on the left hand side. I'm thinking to cut insides of this compartment out, make a mold of all space inside the wheel arch cover and put box there with 10" shallow mount sub. I will make a mold with foam spray, then trim the edges and make a box from fiberglass cloth end epoxy. Thats why I ask for advice I never build anything with fiberglass yet, but thanks anyway.

Answered on 04/24/2012 by James Carter

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I suggest you use Chipboard or MDF.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by GUY JOHNSON

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No problems, thanks.

Answered on 04/24/2012 by James Carter

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Can not anser this, sorry.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by MARK GINSBERG

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i WOULD USE the fibreglass cloth only as a reiforcer to the base material of your speaker box.

Answered on 04/25/2012 by RICHARD SIMONDS
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Question

I am trying to build a light weight teardrop camper and am thinking about using fiberglass for the sides and top.The fiberglass would be layed up on a 1 inch by 3/4 inch wooden frame. How many layers of cloth would be needed for strength and should the cloth be layed up with each layer at a 45 degree angle?

Asked on 03/01/2012 by Gary Sublette

Top Answer

Thanks for your reply, I was thinking about using polyester resin. Do you think epoxy resin would be better than polyester resin? I have only used polyester resin while building model airplanes and seems to work well on a small scale.

Answered on 03/03/2012 by Gary Sublette
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Yes, I really do think epoxy resin is better. You really should do a test of both resins and see which you like. Perhaps 3 X 6" X 6" patches. That would show you a lot. Don

Answered on 03/21/2012 by DONALD SPINELLI

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Gary, I am not an expert. Just a hobbyist tinkering with boat building for 40 years (can't believe it's been that long) but I would think 3 layers of 6 oz. cloth would be sufficient. It all depends on how much strength you are looking for. If your design has a fair amount of curves to it, instead of flat panels (a teardrop shape should be excellent), that will add to the strength. Laying up at 45 degrees is a good idea but I think it will add little strength. Easier to do would be adding a 4th or 5th layer of cloth , if needed. I assume you will be saturating the cloth with epoxy. Once that epoxy is set the direction of the cloth will not matter that much. A word of advise if you are using epoxy and plan to store this outside. Epoxy does a good job of degrading in sunlight over time. So when you're done be sure to give it a good coat of UV protection. Any paint will give this to you. Good luck. Should be a nice project.

Answered on 03/02/2012 by DONALD SPINELLI

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I am ordering 6 oz. fiberglass 50in x 10yds. Will this pack be shipped in a roll?

Answered on 03/20/2012 by Ray Mitchell

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Thanks for your reply. I was thinking of using polyester resin instead of epoxy. Do you think epoxy is better. I have used polyester before and it worked well and is less expensive.

Answered on 03/20/2012 by Gary Sublette
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Question

I'm looking for 60 inch wide 6 ounce fiberglass so I can do the inside of my 15ft prospector as one piece?

Asked on 04/20/2015 by Ron Boudreau

Top Answer

Ron, You won't have a problem w/60" cloth. Just drape it so it lays on bottom, then wet it out from the keel about three feet from one end. You will need to cut it along the keel and trim some off but make sure you have an overlap at both ends of about 6". After you do the first end, it's anchored the cloth. Then start again where you began and work toward the other end. Always maintain a wet edge. It helps to have someone mix your epoxy tokeep things going. This is how I did my 16' Peterbourgh. G.' Luck PW

Answered on 04/20/2015 by PHILLIP WESTENDORF
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Hey Phillip, Thanks. The question was whether or not they 'had' 60inch cloth. The drop down only showed 48in. Thanks

Answered on 04/21/2015 by Ron Boudreau

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Ron, If you have not yet, check out Bear Mountain Boats web site. They have a great forum where you can access tons of information on building strippers.

Answered on 04/21/2015 by PHILLIP WESTENDORF

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I find it MUCH easier to handle and lay two 30 or 36" strips. Easier to get out air and it won't hurt to have the overlap down the keel.

Answered on 04/20/2015 by Prelude Prelude
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Question

what glue should i use with this?

Asked on 06/26/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Any two part epoxy will work. I use MAS epoxy and it has worked great on the seven boats I have built with it. I also have used West and the dingy I built in 1982 with it is still in use.

Answered on 06/28/2013 by WILLIAM STIRLING
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i used the epoxy kit with hearing plungers worked into glass with scrapers

Answered on 06/26/2013 by JAMES KEYSER

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I use West System epoxy which works well.

Answered on 06/26/2013 by JESSE WALTON

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I guess it depends somewhat on what you are applying the glass to We usually use West System Epoxy

Answered on 06/26/2013 by J T MARSHALL
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Question

I am building a 10' plywood mini speed boat. Is 6 oz going to be strong enough? I live on Lake Erie and will have pounding waves to deal with at times. Also looking for a good resin. Any suggestions?

Asked on 03/23/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It's a trade off of weight vs. strength. You need to balance what the design requires against overbuilding. 6 oz. is pretty easy to sand through, I mostly use it to finish off surfaces where I want more protection than just a coat of epoxy but it's not required for the strength of the boat. Sometimes I run glass tape up the keel and then put a lighter cloth over. I do this to provede protection where the boat will be pulled up on the hard. Good luck.

Answered on 03/26/2012 by MICHAEL MCGARTY
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As far as your 6oz glass question; It will work fine, it is the application that is important. One, buy enough to cut 4" stripps to apply 2) of those 4" spripps to all the seams inside and out. The put two layers of 6oz glass to the outside of the complete hull. As far as epoxy; I use MAS, because it has no ambian blush that needs to be washed off before sanding. I hope this helps, Michael Welcome Slough Boatworks

Answered on 03/23/2012 by MICHAEL BACCELLIERI

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Used this cloth to patch a hole in a 20 year old kevlar/fiberglass canoe. It was strong enough to paddle down the Missouri River (340 miles) between Kansas City and St. Louis. Much more slow pace than you though. For what it's worth...hope this helps.

Answered on 04/04/2012 by WILLIAM SCHELP

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Can I go with thicker glass to eliminate having to glass it twice? I would rather over build than have it leak. I have taken it down to the lake and had over 500 lbs in it and still could have added another 500 lbs. So weight is not an issue.

Answered on 03/26/2012 by yekrats25 y
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Question

is this a loose weave or tight weave?

Asked on 10/21/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

This is a tight weave. I used it to fiberglass new sailboat floor.

Answered on 10/25/2011 by ROBERT WELCH
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This is a relatively tight weave fabric which will give excellent coverage while still a light enough in weight and density to conform to tight contours and smaller radial curves on outside corners. You are not looking through this fabric when you hold it up, but once wet, it turns almost completely transparent. In high wear areas, a second layer should be considered if you cannot use a heavier weight fabric due to conformity limitations such as keel work.

Answered on 10/25/2011 by ROCKY COLLLURA

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It is a tight weave

Answered on 10/24/2011 by RICHARD SIMONDS

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I would consider this cloth a tight weave. Don

Answered on 10/24/2011 by DONALD SPINELLI
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Question

I have a hole in the hull of a 13ft. sailboat. The tear is a u shape about 10" across.The flap lays down fairly well where it came from.My ? Should I glass over the whole flap or just tape and glass the tear. Thank You Skip P.

Asked on 09/07/2015 by Skip Potts

Top Answer

if it was mine, would glass the whole flap, with some glass over in the inside if possible.

Answered on 09/07/2015 by CLIFFORD PIRNAT
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My opinion is that glassing over the whole flap would provide more strength to your repair. Also since the fiberglass is translucent you should get a better looking repair because you will have an easier time smoothing out the edges. My experience is that the edges tend to fray so one larger piece is easier to blend. Good luck!

Answered on 09/08/2015 by MIKE SAILSBERY

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I would glass over the entire area inside with multiple layers and after that hardens v out the wound and cover entire area I always recommend epoxy for its. Superior strength

Answered on 09/08/2015 by Cheryl Hirsch
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I was wondering if this Is a good fiberglass cloth to use for a custom longboard I'm making. I want to have it be strong and flexible,also what epoxy should I use and how many sheets of fiberglass cloth??

Asked on 04/06/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I would say it would be appropriate, strong and flexible. I used it to patch a flexible plastic Scanoe that was consequently dragged over rocks and shoals for years with no problem. Others had told me that bond would never take. As for size of strip you will have to experiment especially around curves. I don't know much about Longboards but it seems like it is going to take a lot of strips to cover one. You may be looking at some money if you use this small packages. Good luck.

Answered on 04/09/2015 by KATHLEEN RUGEL
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Two layers of 6 oz cloth will give you a strong lay up. Use 5 to 1 epoxy resin like West System or Totalboat Epoxy Resin, or MAS Low Viscosity Epoxy Resin and hardener.

Answered on 04/07/2015 by Rick White

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I would say it would be appropriate, strong and flexible. I used it to patch a flexible plastic Scanoe that was consequently dragged over rocks and shoals for years with no problem. Others had told me that bond would never take. As for size of strip you will have to experiment especially around curves. I don't know much about Longboards but it seems like it is going to take a lot of strips to cover one. You may be looking at some money if you use this small packages. Good luck.

Answered on 04/09/2015 by KATHLEEN RUGEL
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Hi, Is 4oz cloth OK for a stitch and glue kayak or do I need 6 oz? Thanks,

Asked on 06/10/2014 by Undisclosed

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I make cedar strip canoes using the 4 oz. 6 oz would add weight, but might be more resistive to extreme abrasion. 6 oz may also be stiffer at joints/corners and may be slower to saturate with epoxy. Avoid riding on rocks and 4 oz should be adequate.

Answered on 06/16/2014 by BARRY KAROW
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I do not know, sorry not to be of help.

Answered on 06/10/2014 by MARK GINSBERG

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I built a kayak from a kit; which uses 6oz but there is another kit supplier that uses 4oz and some 6 oz in stress areas. I'm happy with 6oz, my 14.5 ft kayak weighs 41 pounds which has 4 layers of epoxt plus glass.

Answered on 06/10/2014 by RON SIEGEL
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Question

What wieght fiberglass should I use to cover an 18 foot plywood boat?

Asked on 11/01/2013 by Daylon Hicks

Top Answer

Minimum 6 oz 8would be better far hard use.

Answered on 11/04/2013 by RICHARD SIMONDS
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6 oz should be good

Answered on 12/25/2013 by J T MARSHALL

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The directions for my canoe building said to use 6 oz fabric. Bottom areas were double covered (2 applications). It made a strong hull for me.

Answered on 11/01/2013 by JERRY A. OLSON
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