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Epoxy / Gelcoat Coloring Agents
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Epoxy / Gelcoat Coloring Agents
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Epoxy / Gelcoat Coloring Agents Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 19 Questions

Question

I want to fiberglass the motor cover in my boat and make it gray or white do do think this will work if so how much do you think i need to color the fiber glass ?

Asked on 01/10/2015 by Perry Quick

Top Answer

It's difficult to say how much coloring agent to use. I used a small amount and it changed the color but it took a few coats to get to the color I was trying to achieve. The more coloring agent I used the longer it took for the fiberglass to harden.

Answered on 01/11/2015 by ROBERT FALCONE
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Answer

I wouldn't add the coloring agent to the entire mix of epoxy you wet the cloth with but when the cover is complete finish with a coat or two of tinted gel coat to protect the fiberglass from photo degradation. Gel coat comes in white or natural. I've never done gray before. You use white if you want a pastel color like gray. Natural if you want an opaque-primary color like black. I would think natural gel coat would stay black if you added black tint so I would start with white gel coat. You should only need one tube of black coloring agent. White with a little black should make gray. Start with just a dollop, size of a dime in a half pint Chinese takeout mixing cup full of gel coat, mix it in. Make one shade darker than you want final shade to be as it lightens ever so slightly when it drys.

Answered on 01/11/2015 by HENRY KRZEWINSKI

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When you say fiberglass, I'm going to assume you mean the polyester resin or epoxy resin. Fiberglass is a cloth. Applying gel coat or paint over the fiberglass cover will get you grey or white dependent on the color or tint you choose and have UV protection. I would recommend for ease of use and superior quality both in looks and protection brushing on a couple coats of Pettit Easypoxy in your choice of colors and you'll be done with it.

Answered on 01/11/2015 by GARRETT FALLS

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The gel color works well and is compatable with the epoxy. Just mix in small amounts of the color as it is very consintrated until you get the desired tint you want.

Answered on 01/10/2015 by JAY GLENN

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Thanks

Answered on 01/10/2015 by Perry Quick

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Would like to help, but I did not use the coloring agent. It is still on the shelf.

Answered on 01/11/2015 by Clyde King

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can i color the resin

Answered on 01/10/2015 by Perry Quick

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The gel color works well and is compatable with the epoxy. Just mix in small amounts of the color as it is very consintrated until you get the desired tint you want.

Answered on 01/10/2015 by JAY GLENN

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Yes. You need to use the white pigment gel and not the transparent resin

Answered on 01/10/2015 by TODD BENZING

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It will work. The amount needed will depend on the size of the cover but a quart of white gel with a tube of black die to make the gray color should do the job..

Answered on 01/10/2015 by TODD BENZING
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Question

how much resin will 2 ozs color in white?

Asked on 09/26/2011 by Ray Tarr

Top Answer

Without having measured how much I used with the resin/hardener mix, all I can say is that it goes a long way. Very little is needed, I just dipped the stirring stick into the pigment before mixing a 4oz batch of epoxy.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by STEPHEN PLAYS
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A half gallon with excellent coverage.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by JOHN STILGOE

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I was tinting a quart of white to a cream color to match a Holiday Mansion Houseboat I repaired. I used less than half a tube of brown and yellow to get the color to match. Add a few drops at a time and mix thoroughly until the proper tint is obtained. Don't put in too much tint at a time as the whole quart could be wasted.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by WILLIAM MORGAN

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Ray. I used the Black coloring agent for some work I was doing. I used small batches and was surprised how little coloring I needed to make a solid black. To give you an idea, for one pump of resin and equivalent hardener (West System 105A size) I dipped a thin coffee stirrer into the the coloring agent and mixed it into the epoxy. That was all it needed. I would try experimenting with the white a little at a time until you get the color you're looking for. I did find, if I added too much, it affected the hardening of the epoxy. You can always add more, but taking some out won't work. Good luck!

Answered on 09/27/2011 by WILLIAM CURTIS

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Ray, I have not used it for large amounts of resin. I find that a single small drop colors a teaspoon of resin nicely. Thus far I have only used the white for small gel coat repairs. John VB

Answered on 09/27/2011 by JOHN VAN BUREN

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I have used 2 ozs. of white coloring to one half gallon of resin and been happy.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by JOHN STILGOE

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It goes a long way, I would say that 2 oz. will tint over a gallon of resin. Some of the resins will state the highest percent of pigment that can be used with thier product.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by CHRIS WEAVER

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I have never tried using any more than the 2 ozs per gal of epoxy (alphapoxy). Just keep in mind it is not going to be bold like paint, more of a translucent eggshell look no matter how much you put in. It also is not going to give any UV protection and will weeken the resin. I mix this coloring agent with Polyester finishing Resin at a higher rate and make a poor mans gelcoat out of it regularly. I would never use this agent in my main layup except maybe for some sort of tooling. If you just need UV protection you might try some aluminum powder additive.

Answered on 09/28/2011 by JOHN PERKINS
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Question

Is the black pigment one of the lamp blacks?

Asked on 02/02/2015 by Reed Spaulding

Top Answer

Thanks Henry, I was looking to color shellac. I used some black pigment for coloring concrete. Worked great!

Answered on 03/19/2015 by Reed Spaulding
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Every time I've seen lamp black, it was a powder. This is a thick liquid, so it doesn't spread over everything within 10 ft, as lamp lack would. Hope this helps, Jim S

Answered on 02/03/2015 by JIM SIMONS

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I bought from JD something called Black Pigment Dispersion, 2ounce size. A few drops does a great job of coloring big pump's worth of System 3.

Answered on 03/04/2015 by BRUCE ETTINGER

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It is something that should be on the label or in the MSDS for the product. There any number of black pigments that could be used and each mfg has their own reasons for choosing what goes into their formula.

Answered on 02/03/2015 by CALVIN GUTHRIE

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I don't know. Good question. I do know that all pigments meant for gel coat are of the same composition just different tints or colors used like in house paint. They did have a gray gel coat. To get dark black you need to start with a neutral gel coat base if you use white as a base you will get a pastel gray shade.

Answered on 03/19/2015 by HENRY KRZEWINSKI
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Question

champion bassboat gel coat has cable rub scratches. How to repair?

Asked on 03/26/2014 by Ken Holland

Top Answer

if they aren't deep just sand w/ 100 grit ,clean off all dust, wipe w/ acetone and fill with fast epoxy mixed with a color pigment you could if this is a high wear area epoxy glue a piece of stainless steel 14 to 16 gauge cut to cover the wear area over this area to protect the gelcoat

Answered on 03/26/2014 by WALT LOUKOTA
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I would leave it alone, if they are only scratches, and no fibreglass is exposed. You can buff the area with rubbing compound (go easy, nothing aggressive), polish, and wax over the area with a good marine grade wax.

Answered on 03/26/2014 by JANE SEA KAYAK CAROLINA

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If is colored, you will try a base gelcoat (white ) add coloring agents to try to match the color, spray, sand and polish. You can ask the manufacturer if they have a gelcot repair kit or check with Spectrum coatings for a kit. If it is metalflake I do not know how to match it.

Answered on 03/26/2014 by BARRY HESSINGER

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if they are not to deep you can buff them out with 3M perfecta compound gel

Answered on 03/26/2014 by KEITH KUHL

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I repaired many scratches and minor dings is a fiberglass jet boat using gel coat. Two things to consider. Color matching is difficult especially if the original finish had weathered. I also found the gel coat hard to smooth to match the original luster. Using a very fine rubbing compound might reduce the visibility of the scratches without all the effort of gel coat. If you do try the gel coat, first experiment on something below the water line. Hope this helps.

Answered on 03/26/2014 by DUANE ACKERMAN
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Question

What is the mixture ratio per gallon of gel coat to coloring agent?

Asked on 07/29/2015 by Tim Debrecht

Top Answer

There is no set ratio. On my old O'day sailboat I have three different shades of blue. You have to custom match the amount of tint according to your individual boat. I found one tube of tint to a quart will cover the darkest color. I am a little bit out of date with gel coat shades now. They offer so many different pre mixed colored gel coats. I am only experienced on blues on O'day sail boats. One thing I will say. Gel coat is much better than paint and I would not even buy a boat that was painted over.

Answered on 07/30/2015 by HENRY KRZEWINSKI
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I regret that I cannot help since I have not used the product.

Answered on 07/29/2015 by JOHN WIGNEY

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These coloring agents go a long way. In any case, it would be difficult to specify "use x ounces of agent in y quarts of resin to get z shade" of a particular color. I'd suggest starting with a little color agent, blend it well in the resin to attain the desired shade. If you need to replicate this over multiple batches, accurately measure the agent. For example, squeeze out an inch onto a flat surface, then blend it in. If that's too light, then squeeze out another inch. The color should always be mixed in the raw resin, that is before you have added the accelerator or catalyst. You do not want your color experiment to be rushed by the expiring pot life.

Answered on 07/29/2015 by JIM SIMONS

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I don't know the ratio, I add color while mixing until I get the desired color i want. The color aditive is very consintrated so a small amount goes along way

Answered on 07/29/2015 by JAY GLENN
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Question

adding to much coloring agent will affect the gel coat? I m trying to make Vivid red gel coat. I need a quart how much tint is safe to use?

Asked on 06/13/2015 by angel aponte

Top Answer

forgot to mention I have white gel coat

Answered on 06/13/2015 by angel aponte
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I don't have a reference on gel coat, but it looks like you can add up to 20% to epoxy without affecting strength very much.

Answered on 06/24/2015 by Rick White

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My experience with blue but if you buy a tube of tint and mix with neutral gel coat, NOT white, you will get the darkest red and should match. If you start with white and add red tint it will be pink or pastel color. I would start with the neutral gel coat. Good luck.

Answered on 07/30/2015 by HENRY KRZEWINSKI
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Question

I have two Sawyer Cruiser canoes (60's vintage) that I need to re-coat. The red one is bright red and needs to be matched at roughly the water line. The blue one is more light sky to robin egg blue. Any thoughts on best pigments and gelcoat type to use to best effect (or at least a starting point to work from)?

Asked on 03/18/2015 by Paul Runnels

Top Answer

Thanks for the quick reply! I don't do much Chinese take out, but I've got dozens of 28 oz (or so) yogurt containers that I've used for epoxy resins - hopefully they'll work for the gel coat as well. The canoes are fiberglass with gel coat. I'll check JD for the natural and white base, but the project will need to wait for a bit warmer weather since a lot of the prep will need to be outside (Michigan)!

Answered on 03/19/2015 by Paul Runnels
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Unfortunately I sold my project before I got to this level of finish.

Answered on 03/18/2015 by Habu Habu

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You have to start with the white gel coat as a base for the pastel blue and the neutral gel coat for the dark or bright red. I don't know if the neutral gel coat is still available. If not available get an extra tube of red to add enough to get it dark instead of pastel. I would get a tube of red color and another of the blue. I would think a quart of gel coat should do for each canoe as your just really repainting it. I use the cups from Chinese take out as mixing cups so since you will need quite a bit I would start out with a pint cup, add enough color a glob at a time and try to count so it's repeatable. Mix well. I would use the keel as a guide and try to do each side with the pint of gel coat. I would put on with a roller and do the roll and tip with a fine brush. If you spray make sure you use the right air mask. I am not familiar with Sawyer canoes. I'm assuming they are fiberglass. If they are canvas covered cedar with paint I would use the matching paint color and just repaint. Then again I have used gel coat in place of paint and it always worked out better and lasts a decade or more before having to be redone.

Answered on 03/19/2015 by HENRY KRZEWINSKI
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Question

will your pigments work with gluvit?

Asked on 11/10/2014 by dave nicols

Top Answer

I do not know. Suggest you give it a try.

Answered on 11/10/2014 by JOHN WIGNEY
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Never used the pigment. Still have it.

Answered on 11/11/2014 by Clyde King

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A small amount goes a long ways. By adding small quantities one is able to achieve the desired color. It has no negative effects that I can detect to the cured finished product. I like it.

Answered on 11/10/2014 by JAY GLENN
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Question

I need a champagne colour to repair small chips in a shower tray. What do you suggest?

Asked on 12/13/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Make very small samples of epoxy with mixed pigments. Epoxy will bind with almost any dry pigment.

Answered on 12/14/2013 by ROBERT MATTHEWS
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Try "white, with small amounts of red and yellow" coloring agents to achieve a nice "orange-pinkish" hue. Depending on the repair, you may need an opaque colorant, or perhaps it has to be, transparent, or translucent. I suspect your shower tray will need a white colorant, like say, WEST Epoxy makes. It is a true "opaque" white. To color-mix it to champagne, will take something else. I've found that some company's Gelcoat Coloring Agents have a limited color palette. And are mostly opaque, or nearly so. Some claim to be opaque, but do not have sufficient "chemistry" to be totally opaque. I've since learned how to cope with this. But not to despair, as there are several good resources for helping in this respect. You might find tiny amounts of "RIT" liquid colorants to be very helpful in your project. Any hobby store has them. I've used RIT successfully in conjunction with products supplied from Jamestown Distributors and some from competitors. RIT is a transparent-type of colorant. Since it is transparent, it will give you what you're looking for Im sure. It binds well with fibrous materials, such as strengthening F-glass fabric, etc. If the damage is severe enough, you might need to apply a piece of fiberglass fabric which has been previously saturated or colored. Then use a clear epoxy to wet it out and coat the damaged area. Sanding and repeated coats might be necessary. Hope this helps. Marsh

Answered on 12/14/2013 by MARSHALL HOWARD

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Add pin head amounts of brown and yellow until you're happy with results.

Answered on 12/13/2013 by GARRETT FALLS
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Question

how much of 2.0z will color one quart of gelcoat?

Asked on 05/31/2015 by gene naquin

Top Answer

I have only used the black color for very small epoxy mixes but it is very concentrated and will go a long way. You will have to do a sample mix to be sure of the color shade.

Answered on 05/31/2015 by JOHN DAVIS
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It did for me but that was a light blue starting with the white base gel coat. I see now in the catalog that they have gel coats now all mixed in quart containers ready to use. You need relatively little if you add to white to make a pastel color gel coat.

Answered on 05/31/2015 by HENRY KRZEWINSKI
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