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TotalBoat Polyester Laminating Resin
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TotalBoat Polyester Laminating Resin Gallon
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TotalBoat Polyester Laminating Resin Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 20 Questions

Question

Can I use polyester resin on a strip canoe I am building?

Asked on 07/04/2016 by Mike Kirklin

Top Answer

Our company makes color dispersions for polyester, epoxy, polyols (urethanes), acrylics, alkyds, etc.so we are familiar with the chemistry. I also build strip boats and have experimented extensively with these different finishes in regard to outdoor durability. That includes the addition of hindered amines (HALS), benzotriazole and benzophenone UV inhibitors. Acrylic is the best polymer for outdoors, Polyester is second, 2 part urethanes 3rd and epoxy doesn't last 2 years in the sun. However, when it comes to physical properties such as impact, tensile and elongation, epoxy is best, then polyester, urethane and acrylic (brittle in coatings and difficult to handle). If you are going over wood wet out the glass with epoxy and apply a better UV stable coating such as polyester or urethane over the epoxy. You can also use an alkyd based or spar varnish with UV absorber, usually benzotriazole such as BASF Tinuvin 329 or 400 @ .5%. Chemists have made huge advances in the last 20-50 years in improving the durability of these coatings. These polymers are compatible so watch for and experiment with blends of epoxy, urethane, polyester & acrylic. Don't discount the water based products either. We have used water based epoxy on concrete floors that is almost as good as the bis-a & amine, and WB acrylics that are lasting on wood outdoors for 5 years. Unfortunately liability in our litigious society keeps many of the technical advances from public consumption. Monomers such as PMMA (acrylic), styrene (in polyester) and isocyanate in urethane are nasty and require special handling. Epoxy is relatively safe although some people do react to the amine catalysts.

Answered on 04/13/2019 by CB
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Answer

If you're planning on using the resin along with fiberglass I don't know of any reason why you couldn't. You can probably get away with layer of glass. Plan on using the resin with wax. If you're planning on using the resin (without glass) for waterproofing then I would use a penetrating epoxy resin.

Answered on 07/05/2016 by BRIAN DERYNIOSKI

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Polyester resin would be used with fiberglass mat or fiberglass cloth. If you're looking for adhesion or sealing for wood, you probably want epoxy.

Answered on 07/04/2016 by DAN PERIK

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I wouldn't use polyester resin on it. I would use epoxy.

Answered on 07/04/2016 by COLETON GRAY

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I used polyester w.o wax for the first 3 coats and then switched to epoxy for the hardness. Came out great and the epoxy saves the sand and gravel from scraping the bottom.

Answered on 07/04/2016 by DAVID SKIBBE

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The short answer is yes, the resin by itself has NO strength. You need to use matt or cloth to gain the strength you require. 1 oz matte will disappear when you wet it.

Answered on 07/04/2016 by JAMES WORRELL
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Question

can this be used on a canoe,will it work well?.

Asked on 02/03/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

If the canoe is made of fiberglass the polyester laminating resin is fine. If wood... epoxy resin will work better

Answered on 02/05/2013 by DARRELL MCBRAYER
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Answer

Hello friend, yes this product will work very well on your canoe, in fact, this is probably the best fiberglass material I have ever worked with, I highly recommend it. Your friend, Richard Goad

Answered on 02/04/2013 by RICHARD GOAD

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Hi It can be used but tends to delaminate on oily woods (most of them) . Also it will harden and crack on thin surfaces anyplace it has not well adhered to the base. It works well if there is an epoxy and glass surface as reinforcing but dont use it in areas exposed to lot of ultrviolet. If you use it makes sure wood surfaces have been well roughed so that it has a lot to adhere to.

Answered on 02/05/2013 by JAMES POSTON

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as long as you mix it right . if you are using fiber glass ,make sure ir is saturated well

Answered on 02/04/2013 by FRANK DALIE

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If your canoe is fiberglass then the answer is most likely yes. The only reasons that you wouldn't use it on fiberglass construction would be if you are using it on a high tech laminate that used epoxy or if you would be using it over a repair that used epoxy. The reason is that epoxy resin sticks well to polyester, but polyester doesn't stick to epoxy very well. If your canoe is Royalex, you can repair it with epoxy resin, but this polyester isn't the best material. If your canoe is polyethylene, you should contact the manufacturer for a repair kit, since no resin sticks well to it. The other thing you would need to know is that the surface of this resin won't harden if it is exposed to air. This is good if you are building up multiple layers, but to get a finished surface, you will need to cover your last layer with a barrier such as wax or mold release or gel coat containing wax.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by MICHAEL SHUGG
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Question

What color does this resin dry to? Is this good for surfboard repair?

Asked on 08/22/2012 by billy mont

Top Answer

Mine dried to clear with a light brown tint. I have no idea as far as surfboards go because I used mine on an audio enclosure. It is very hard and therefore difficult to sand, however, that's all resins i've seen. (i believe surfboards are molded normally so your repair may look a little rough when you're done.) As a general note, go easy on the hardener that is included. It sets up quick and I found that using (slightly) less than they recommended worked better for my project.

Answered on 08/22/2012 by TRAVIS MILLER
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You know you're right. This stuff might have an ever so slight blueish tint to it. Been awhile since I've used it. If you're looking for bright white though, there are color tint additives that can be mixed into the resin/hardener mix to make just about any color you want. Whites are tough to match though as you probably know. Good luck with the project. Ridge

Answered on 08/22/2012 by RIDGE GARDNER

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It dries pretty clear, Billy. Should work well for surf board repair. Remember though, you will either need to use finishing resin or add wax to the laminating resin for your final "go" coat, prior to sanding and finishing. Ridge

Answered on 08/22/2012 by RIDGE GARDNER

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Very cool. Thanks for the tips. From my reading, some have a blue tint to them, and seem to have a better final color for surfboads...bright white. Any suggestions for that?

Answered on 08/22/2012 by billy mont

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clear amber, without a coloring agent.

Answered on 08/22/2012 by JAMES SNELL
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Question

Ive been making male plugs from plaster, finishing them with high build primers such as krylon covermax and rustoleum ultercover. I polish them and cover with mold release -honey wax and pd ultra. Then I make a female mold casting the plug with fiberglass and polyester resin. The problem is that the polyester resin seems to melt the primer. After I pop the mold I'm left with a kind of curdled texture on the surface. The question is: What kind of coating should I be using that is not permeable to the polyester resin?

Asked on 10/02/2014 by GLENN REED

Top Answer

Yes gel coat is a polyester resin finish type coat. If you need primer you will probably have to use also a polyester such as SLICK SAND which is a spray on catalyzed surfacer primer made for polyester resins. I used this type for surfacing corvette fiberglass bodies before epoxy primer.

Answered on 10/03/2014 by MARVIN PHILLIPS
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can't help on this

Answered on 10/03/2014 by FRANK DALIE

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Thank you Marvin, Isn't a gel coat polyester ? The polyester melts the (sprayed on)primer. I need something between the very smooth and fished primer and the polyester resin. I was trying to avoid trial and error by asking to see if someone knows the solution Glenn

Answered on 10/03/2014 by GLENN REED

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The only coating I know that will work is gel coat; however, a polyester resin primer if you do not need a finish coat. Otherwise, just trial and error until you find something that will work. Any catalzyed finish might work but I expect that the only sure bets are going to be gel coat or a polyester resin finish They are made to work with the dibasic organic acids and polyhyric alcohols in the resins. Good luck.

Answered on 10/02/2014 by MARVIN PHILLIPS
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Question

is this a water clear resin when dry or does it dry with a tint?

Asked on 04/23/2014 by joe cimino

Top Answer

It has a slight pink tint. If you want clear, epoxy resin is better.

Answered on 04/23/2014 by MICHAEL SHUGG
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I used the resin in my engine bilge area, on my runabout. the resin looks real clear, like water. but the the left over in the cup I had been using dried a little yellow, looks like tree sap...hope that helps.

Answered on 04/23/2014 by STEVEN MURPHY

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It drys to a tint, but very light, if it is the same stuff I got before. It had more of a translucent effect as opposed to crystal clear like system 3. I laid over mahogany/marine plywood and the color of the wood looked good. I've bought a number of gallons of this stuff at different times and the color has varied. Hope this helps. Chris

Answered on 04/23/2014 by CHRISTOPHER M JOHNSON

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what i have drys almost clear . hope this helps

Answered on 04/23/2014 by FRANK DALIE
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Question

When applying fiberglass cloth to plywood do it set it in with laminating resin then apply finishing resin over it? Or can I set the cloth in finishing resin then coat it again? Thanks Jess Hall

Asked on 10/16/2012 by Jess Hall

Top Answer

it depends: what is the desired result? why are you applying fiberglass to the plywood, for strength? for durability? is it a marine application?

Answered on 10/16/2012 by WENZDAY JANE
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Hi Jess, The difference between laminating resin and finish resin is that the laminating resin has no wax in it. When applied the wax in the finish resin rises to the top and acts as an oxygen barrier allowing the resin to cure tack free. If you allow the finish resin to dry tack free before applying another layup you will need to sand it first then apply the new layup. If you do it before it becomes tack free there is no problem. Laminating resin allows you to do all your layups without having to sand between them if they are separated over a long period of time. Make sure you wet out the plywood first so it does not absorb all the resin from the cloth when applied, work out air bubbles and use acetone to clean the surface and any layups that you have allowed to fully cure for a good bond. I hope that helped. Leon

Answered on 10/16/2012 by LEON HUBBY

Answer

Jess, I generally apply a healthy coat of laminating resin the the surface of the ply, then lay the cloth. After that I float and spread on enough laminating resin to complete fill the screed of the cloth causing it to turn almost transparent. Any dry spots will show up white. Once everything is comletely saturated and allowed to dry, you can then overcoat with finishing resin without sanding which will then dry hard to the touch with no discernible tackiness. This method will assure a good cloth to wood bond and give you a nice smooth paintable surface after a little sanding. Hope this helps.. Ridge

Answered on 10/16/2012 by RIDGE GARDNER

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You can do either. If the one coat of resin with the fiberglass will make it thick and/or strong enough, you can use just the one coat of finishing resin. If it will require another coat or you need to bond other items to the laid fiberglass use the laminating resin. The finishing resin contains wax that floats to the top to provide an air free environment to cure. The laminated resin contains no wax, so it will remain a little sticky. Ideally the laminating resin has to be coated with finishing resin to completely loose the tackiness. However, if you need to attach additional items to the laid fiberglass this is the way to go, because the finishing resin had to be sanded for additional items to stick, Hope this helps.

Answered on 10/16/2012 by MARVIN PHILLIPS
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Question

I am using this product to replace the stringers in a 22' Center console. I plan on recoating the bilge area of the boat with resin when filleting, then painting the bilge with bilge paint. I am not looking for a superior finish just a durable easy to maintain surface. Can I save time and work by skipping the sanding step or is sanding required before painting over this resin? Same question for this product with wax.

Asked on 08/11/2015 by Scott H

Top Answer

I had slight imperfections using a roller nothing I would worry too much about it in my bilge

Answered on 08/11/2015 by RICHARD EDMONDSON
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I would definitely recommend sanding if you want the painted surface to last and be durable. The paint will chip off easily if you don't sand the surface, you might try and etching chemical but I have no experience with it.

Answered on 08/11/2015 by TRISTAN MCKEE

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If you finish with laminating resin you will not have to sand before painting. If you add wax to the laminating resin it becomes finishing resin and you will definitely have to sand before painting.

Answered on 08/11/2015 by BAYLINE, INC.
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Question

I have a cracked fender The fender and the hood is one piece on my offroad baja bug. on the underside I want to put down fiberglass and resin to repair crack that is about 12 in. and goes to the end of the panel. What is the best product for this thanks?? ED

Asked on 04/04/2014 by Ed Ginsberg

Top Answer

how does this differ from epoxy resin, and can that be used with fiberglass cloth

Answered on 04/04/2014 by Ed Ginsberg
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Answer

TotalBoat Polyester Laminating Resin and TotalBoat Polyester Finishing Resin are both candidates for your repair. The important difference is that the Laminating resin does NOT contain wax and will cure to a 'tacky' surface, ready to have additional layers of cloth and resin added to it. The Finishing resin, on the other hand, DOES contain wax, which causes it to cure to a tack-free, hard surface. This is great if it's your last layer, but also means you have to sand away the surface layer if you want to add more laminations to it. Assuming that you have multiple layers of fiberglass in your repair and you can't put them all on in a single application of resin, your best bet is to get both, using the laminating resin for the base layers and the finishing resin for the very last layer. You could also get just the laminating resin and buy the styrene wax separately, adding it to only your last round of resin.

Answered on 04/04/2014 by JEREMY VORE
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Question

What is the open working time?

Asked on 03/14/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Working time varies based on temperature and amount of catalyst added. I found the recommendations on the package to be spot on.

Answered on 03/14/2014 by MICHAEL SHUGG
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Answer

well it depends how you mix it .i try for 10-15 mins it drys slow .but it is stronger that way . if it get fairley hot it has to much hardner in it .you'll have to play with it to get the right mix .just go by the instructions first time . .hope this helps

Answered on 03/14/2014 by FRANK DALIE
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Question

I have assembled a tackle center out of coosa board. Plan to cover it with this polyester resin. What do you recommend thickening it with? Plan to sand and spray gel coat after. Advice appreciated. John

Asked on 02/05/2013 by John Jackson

Top Answer

I would put a light layer of glass cloth down to cover the coosa and seams.

Answered on 02/20/2013 by Nathan N
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Personally, I would lay up a couple of layers of glas fiber cloth to add structural strength, then follow with enough coats of resin to obtain a smooth finish. A couple of coats should do it, and give you enough thickness to sand without getting down to the cloth. If, however, you just want to thicken the resin to, for example, create fillets, use microbeads or microspheres. Be warned, however, that unreinforced resin is much, much weaker than the same thickness reinforced wth cloth.

Answered on 03/07/2013 by CHARLES MASI
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