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TotalBoat White and Neutral Gelcoats
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TotalBoat White Gelcoat with Wax Gallon
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TotalBoat White and Neutral Gelcoats Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 44 Questions

Question

Hello, will you please explain what this means?( Neutral gelcoat is better with coloring agents. White is more opaque with coloring agents). I'm repairing a rudder that will be coated with bottom paint in the end. Thank you, Brian

Asked on 06/01/2018 by none from undisclosed

Top Answer

White gelcoat has a lot of white (TiO2) in it. If you are trying to tint your gelcoat to a red, blue, black, yellow, or some other bold color, you would want to start with what we call a neutral gelcoat, which has none of the TiO2 that makes it white, and it's a sort of translucent beige/gray color. The colorants are very strong, but you can realistically only add 10-12% colorant to the gelcoat. On a side note, for a rudder that you will be bottom painting, you might not want to gelcoat it (unless you need to for some racing one design rules), you would want to use a fairing compound and then likely barrier coat it prior to bottom paint.

Answered on 06/19/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Answer

I can only assume that the more opaque result is only important for blocking the light on a part that has no liner. As in a deck or hull in a small boat that you would not wish to see light coming through on the other side. I do not see it being an issue for a rudder. I would just use the white and not have to be bothered with pigment at all, especially when it painted over with antifouling paint.

Answered on 06/01/2018 by captsven

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If you are seeking to color your gelcoat to match an existing color (or faded white gelcoat), you may want to start with a "buff" color (i.e.; neutral color) and tint it with a coloring agent. If you are (as you indicate) working on a rudder that will ultimately be painted, you can use white gelcoat and paint the final product. I've used Jamestown Distributor's Total Boat gelcoat and found it easy to work with and a very good product. Good luck with your rudder.

Answered on 06/01/2018 by rgeorge

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It's probably saying that gelcoat looks better after you add color. I don't think that it matters in your case since you plan to paint it.

Answered on 06/02/2018 by johndyson

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Hi Brian, My understanding of gelcoat is the concern when trying to match a colored gelcoat on the hull.  Neutral seems to give better color tone or is closer to the color one is looking for.  White will make the color additive more opaque (cloudy color?)...perhaps not as clear a color/true color match. It shouldn't be a concern if you are applying to a rudder that will then be painted with bottom paint.  Neutral would be a bit more versatile if you wanted to tint it to match existing gelcoat on your boat.  And if you have a white hull and topsides, then get white. Hope this helped. Migs

Answered on 06/02/2018 by mbalaguero57

Answer

You use coloring agents if you want to match the new gelcoat to existing gelcoat, as in a repair. If you are painting the rudder after gelcoat, either gelcoat, white or neutral should work. But do you need to gelcoat if you will be painting?

Answered on 06/01/2018 by jlandes
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Question

does this gelcoat dry glossy or flat?

Asked on 01/17/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Semi gloss to glossy when it cures.

Answered on 02/16/2013 by PETER WINTJEN
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MORE SEMI GLOSS TO FLAT, NOT GLOSS BUT VERY SMOOTH.

Answered on 02/14/2013 by RALPH SCHISLER

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This will cure to a semi gloss finish, you will not achieve a high gloss finish unless it is wet sanded and buffed. Thank you.

Answered on 02/14/2013 by Kerry Souza

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glossy if sprayed on correctly

Answered on 02/15/2013 by BRUCE FIELDS

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The white dries flat.

Answered on 02/14/2013 by DAVID COOPER

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It's glossy and does not need wax. Sand and polish after for a great finish

Answered on 02/14/2013 by NICHOLAS HAINES
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Question

I have a centerboard coated with Interlux VC Performance Epoxy. Can I apply gelcoat over this?

Asked on 04/13/2018 by Mike from Cleveland, OH

Top Answer

We do not recommend attempting to gelcoat over VC Performance. The VC Performance should be removed before applying gelcoat.

Answered on 06/04/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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If Interlux VC epoxy Is a 2 part epoxy,  probably. If it's a single part modified epoxy bottom paint, don't do it.

Answered on 04/13/2018 by bill.bluestate

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My first guess in no. That said, if it is important to you to do so, confirm by contacting Interlux.

Answered on 04/13/2018 by ldallen

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The general rule of thumb is that you can apply epoxy resin over polyester resin but that polyester resin will not bond well if applied on top of epoxy.  Gelcoat is polyester resin.  So,  there is a good chance that gelcoat applied over epoxy will fail.   Bob

Answered on 04/13/2018 by rbtderoeck

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Yes, though I have not personally tried it as I typically bond over polyester but according to the data sheets, it is possible as long as you prep exactly according to directions and that the epoxy has had a 9 week cure. However, why not coat with tinted epoxy? Since it is a centerboard, and you are not trying to match gelcoat, that might be a better option for you. That way you can sand, flare and polish with one material without worry about bonding delamination. I assume your centerboard is movable and not fix, so that may be more durable for you too. Good Luck

Answered on 04/17/2018 by walt.carper
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Question

I have applied a non-wax product for gel coat repair and used waxed paper to seal the last coat. Unfortunately, I was unable to get the waxed paper to lay flat everywhere and it caused fairly large and deep voids to be left behind. Plus, I got the color wrong (ran out of white). Can I use this product and the colorants to cover the mess? I expect to use 240 grit sand paper to prepare and the waxed white product to cover and tint it for the match. But the voids that are deeper, do they need to be sanded out? Will the product fill that much without sagging or do I have to fill the voids with filler, clean and re-sand before applying the final colored finishing coat?

Asked on 06/12/2018 by James from TX

Top Answer

If you were able to through cure this product by removing all of the air, you should be able to sand even with 80-grit and remove any voids pretty quickly. This product can be tinted as well, using one of our gelcoat colorants, up to 10% (12% for yellows). This product should not be laid down in heavy applications, if it is more than 3/16" thick you may want to use a filler such as TotalBoat Polyester Fairing Compound which is designed exactly for such situations.

Answered on 06/25/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Answer

I have used no wax gel coat with good results just by painting it on, and let it set. The surface is not flat or smooth, but this product sands and polished out well. You can even just dab in gelcoat to fill the depressions, then sand smooth. I would sand everything the wrong color down it below the finished level. Apply new coats correct color to build back up, use no wax paper, it will set just fine. Dry block sand with 180 to smooth out and shape then use wet/dry grades 220 to 2000. Don't skip a grade. Then rub it out with rubbing compound, followed by polishing compound.

Answered on 06/12/2018 by muskiebobber

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Yes this will work.  Non wax, gel, coat and resin is used for multiple layups where you want the surface to remain tacky.Spray this product, Evercoat Polyvinyl Alcohol  on the surface of non wax resin and gel coat to seal it from the oxygen and you will get a cure equivelant to wax, which floats to the surface and seals it.  Spray after the initial cure.   Wash it off with water.  Thin it down as well. Sand it out as best you can.  If voids are really deep, you can fill with resin jell.  Use a hard sponge so the paper will conture to the surface if rounded and a block if flat.  Wet sanding will be better than dry.

Answered on 06/12/2018 by myemail122060

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My (limited) experience with gelcoat is that it will not fill/even out the surface very well, unfortunately. It think you should sand down the surface fairly evenly to prepare it for your finishing coat.

Answered on 06/12/2018 by chrishawes
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Question

I am planning on re doing the gelcoat on the deck of my sailboat. I heard some people add a little bluing agent to tone down the bright white of the gelcoat? Any thoughts on this?

Asked on 04/11/2016 by Jim Horan

Top Answer

Thanks for replying. Love the Boston Whaler! I was more thinking of adding drops of blue which then turns the bright white to a soft white.

Answered on 04/11/2016 by Jim Horan
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That would definitely work. Not sure of the ratios but it should be fine. I used the ever coat gelcoat additive that was royal blue.

Answered on 04/11/2016 by JOHNNY HAND

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Jim, I just completely restored the hull and interior of a 13ft Boston Whaler last month. I used the white gel coat with wax on the hull without adding any coloring agent. The all white had a subtleness to it, it wasn't totally bright white or overwhelming. For the interior of the boat I used the same gelcoat and then added 3 teaspoons of blue epoxy coloring agent per QT of white gelcoat. This matched up almost identical to the original "Boston Whaler" blue from the factory. I also covered the seats and steering console with the white gel coat and I have had the boat out in full sun and it was not crazy bright. I really do like the blue though. I would start with 1 teaspoon per quart to start and you should get a soft kind of baby blue color. Have fun! Hope this helps.

Answered on 04/11/2016 by JOHNNY HAND

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People add all types of coloring agents to the gelcoat they are applying, either to match the existing gelcoat or to apply a completely different color, it's all up to you. An off white would definitely be easier on your eyes.

Answered on 04/11/2016 by RICARDO RODRIGUEZ
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Question

Hi. I am restoring a 13' Whaler. Can I use this gelcoat over the TotalBoat TotalFair Epoxy Fairing Compound? If so, any special preparation other than sanding? Do I need to primer? Thanks.

Asked on 09/17/2015 by Vincent T

Top Answer

Don't read the previous answers and make a big mistake! No, you cannot gelcoat directly over TotalFair (or any epoxy fairing compound) as the gelcoat will not cure. It is in the instructions now. The TotalFair must be primed first. TotalBoat recommended that I use TotalProtect Epoxy Barrier Coat Primer.

Answered on 10/05/2020 by AVID
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Answer

I have used Non wax white gelcoat directly over fiberglass. Just make sure it is sanded smooth, and clean with acetone before applying. If spraying make sure it is thinned properly to the viscosity that your spray gun needs, mix in small batches, and clean gun immediately after spraying or you will have a clogged up gun and a mess.... There are several videos on the net on how others have used this product, and similar products. Lots of good ideas. I mainly use it for repairs, and just brush it on in thin coats. Hope this helps?

Answered on 09/17/2015 by JOHN STOCKMAN

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Just sand with 150 - 320, wipe down with acetone, you will be good to apply the gel coat.

Answered on 09/19/2015 by GLENN WATT

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Yes

Answered on 10/04/2015 by JOHN DZIEDZIC
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Question

How many coats of gel coat is recommended on newly laid fiberglass and would you use a gel coat with wax only on the final coat ?

Asked on 01/13/2015 by Ed Ward

Top Answer

Great answer, thank you

Answered on 02/13/2015 by Ed Ward
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You need to apply enough coats of gel coat to obtain an optimum thickness of 18 mils. Unwaxed gel coat is best for build up layers with the last coat with wax works well. Or you would need to cover or coat the last coat with PVA to seal the air out to cure.

Answered on 01/14/2015 by Rick White

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Thanks Rick you have helped a lot

Answered on 01/14/2015 by Ed Ward

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The wax is normally for a mold release? Since you are not spraying it in a mold, then layering the fiberglass I don't think you need it. When I repair a boat, sand it smooth, clean it with acetone and use regular Gel Coat.

Answered on 02/13/2015 by JOHN STOCKMAN
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Question

hello, what would be the best gel coat if I want to restore gel coat a boat completely? should remove all oxidized gel coat? or could apply the new layer over the old. thanks

Asked on 07/10/2013 by sadi sultan

Top Answer

Sand surface to ruff it up and then clean it with acetone and aply over old. What does the directions say? Depending on the thickness of what's there some damage can be compounded out and then buffed to shine.

Answered on 07/10/2013 by PETER WINTJEN
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I would get some oxidation remover and use a high speed polisher... prepping the old gel coat and applying new gel coat plus wet sanding and using rubbing compound on the entire hull is a huge job....

Answered on 07/11/2013 by DOUGLAS LEE

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You will need to sand the entire surface of the old gel coat and clean of all dust and wipe down with acetone. The sanding is for adhesion purposes.

Answered on 07/11/2013 by RON SIMS

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Cure without release paper or a mold. cure correctly. Qoc

Answered on 07/15/2013 by ROBERT CUNNINGHAM
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Question

Good morning,I'm thinking about removing my headliner(1979 lancer36) and replacing it with a gel coat? It looks like raw glass under the headliner.would you recommend this for a large area?

Asked on 02/11/2015 by James Fitzgerald

Top Answer

yes but make sure not to used acetone to clean surface use MEK

Answered on 02/12/2015 by JOHN ALEXANDER
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YES BUT I WOULD SPRAY IT ON

Answered on 02/11/2015 by FRANK FALANGA

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That depends on whether your spaying it, or brushing it? If it is rough like old weathered fiberglass, it will cost you an arm and a leg to do it. Gel Coat will crack if the area is flexible to any extent. If it is smooth, and clean Gel Coat would work. If you watch the videos on utube on how it is sprayed on a mold, then the glass is layered up, you are doing just the reverse so the fiberglass must be smooth. I have used it to repair glass boats as a final finish and has worked out fine (brush) matching color can be a hassle. On an older boat, sand it smooth, seal it and use gel, or Krylon spray paint works good and lasts Don't tell anyone.

Answered on 02/13/2015 by JOHN STOCKMAN
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Question

How to match colors?

Asked on 11/28/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The coloring agents are advertised in Jamestown Distrubitors catalogue. If you are good at mixing pigments you can come extremely close to the original color? Check out google search for (gelcoat color) There other places that can send you a color chart to match the exact color, and they will mix it for you. More expensive like $55/qt. There are several utuube vidios on the net. Simple colors are easy to match, but I would rather pay more than ruining a $30 qt. Hope this helps.

Answered on 11/28/2014 by JOHN STOCKMAN
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You'll need to buy the gelcoat sampler, with a number of pigments. Then, you can mess with the gelcoat and pigments before you add the hardener. you can make little swatches and just put a thumbprint next to your substrate (without hardener) and get an idea on how your blend matches.

Answered on 12/21/2014 by MIKE MILLS

Answer

The color worked well on the 1998. Boston whaler

Answered on 11/28/2014 by FRANK FALANGA
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