Free shipping on orders over $99.99! Don't miss out!
$55.89 In Stock
Marine-Tex Gluvit Epoxy Water Sealer
$55.89In Stock
Gluvit Epoxy Water Sealer
Ask a Question
4.5
Based on 32 Reviews
  • 5 Star

    63%

  • 4 Star

    28%

  • 3 Star

    6%

  • 2 Star

    0%

  • 1 Star

    3%

Marine-Tex Gluvit Epoxy Water Sealer Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 64 Questions

Question

Has anyone used this on aluminum boat to seal leaking rivets and seams without turning boat over it's huge 18'tracker with 75 hp motor . did not wamt to take motor off? just wondering if I would get a good seal painting from the bottom?.

Asked on 07/30/2011 by Leslie Strickland

Top Answer

Just a follow-up,finished the boat, I put JB waterweld first on the rivets I knew were an issue then 2 coats of GLUV-IT over entire boat. Worth every penny, in the water today not even 1 drop leaked anywhere that I can tell.The one reason I went with this product was because of all the good reviews. Thanks again to everyone who commented,Leslie

Answered on 08/16/2011 by Leslie Strickland
See More Answers (10)

Answer

Leslie:I'll be sure and post when I'm done if this works,it's really hard doing it from the bottom but if it works I think it's easier than removing all the interior and putting it back.From the coverage I see on the bottom I bet this stuff is fantastic from the inside or if you could turn boat over. I just did not want to remove motor,cables and all that.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by Leslie Strickland

Answer

I bought a gallon was gonna mix the whole thing so glad I didn't .I did a 5:1 mix. I have first coat on rivets and seams and the little bit I mixed did the whole thing and was starting to thicken when I was finishing up,if I had did the whole can it would have gone to waste.I have very sensitive skin so long gloves eye goggles and trying to work on a creeper was very time consuming but I think it's gonna pay off seemed to really coat rivets well. Thanks for the reply,Leslie

Answered on 08/05/2011 by Leslie Strickland

Answer

I actually have it wenched up now off the trailer. One coat on one to go Thanks

Answered on 08/05/2011 by Leslie Strickland

Answer

My name is Jeff and I can tell you the product is excellent. I also have an 18' bass aluminum boat. I jacked up the boat just a little off the trailer using, believe it or not, pieces of the green bars used for holding up chicken wire. You can get the bars at home repair stores. I used a large paint brush and put on 2 coats. It works beautifully for leaking rivets. I cut the bars into short pieces to work with.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by JEFFREY GOLD

Answer

I love this stuff! I've used it to seal aluminum and stainless steal tanks, shower pans and fiberglass. It can be applied with a brush and/or a roller and will seek out and fill holes. I see no reason why it wouldn't seal the leaking rivets and seams in your Tracker. My recommendation would be to mix small amounts and use a brush to coat the individual rivets and seams and then use a roller to coat the entire bottom. Two coats works the best. It goes a long way and a couple of quarts should do the job.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by CHIP ESTABROOKS

Answer

Thanks for responding.I actually put a coat on all rivets today. wow what a job upside down,and in an open shed so it's ventilated but 95. I didn't use the whole can just mixed 5:1 so I'm gonna do another coat tomorrow . Next I.m checking on what kind of paint to use to paint over it any suggestions. I'm glad to hear you have no leaks sounds positive I hope I have the same results. Lot of work but I love this boat waited years to buy it. Thanks again!Leslie

Answered on 08/05/2011 by Leslie Strickland

Answer

Norman, I use Gluvit to seal the bottom of my 24' StarCraft boat while trailered. A difficult task to prevent being covered and i ended up with many runs. I used the entire can with one application which created some of my issues as the initial coat was too thick. However, no leaks... I have had my boat in the water for about 10 hours after it cured for almost 2 months (not required but how it worked out for me). I have since painted with one part epoxy style paint without issues. I was very careful in preparation, first washing thoroughly and drying overnight, sanding to rough the existing finish then cleaning with a lacquer thinner to remove all residuals. Good Luck

Answered on 08/04/2011 by NORMAN AGAN

Answer

Thanks, I used all I had,I have did 2 coats like that, I'm fixing to light sand and paint over it wait a week and then try it in the water,will post with results,this was hard to do but I still think a lot easier than taking out the whole interior which looks like brand new. Thanks again for the reply,Leslie

Answered on 08/06/2011 by Leslie Strickland

Answer

I would say, that it probity would work. Put a small coat on, let it dry day or two (or when it is completely dry) and then use fine sand paper to rough it. Then re coat it again. Do about three coats like that. I used it on a wooden propeller, It took me about 30 days like that to get it done. The propeller, is running in all kind of weather for the last 2 years. It looks like new still. I hoped this help you. John

Answered on 08/05/2011 by JOHN T. GREINER
Answer Question

Question

I am looking for something that will provide a high gloss finish to the bottom of my painted aluminum jon boat. Does this produce a High gloss FINISH ON THE BOTTOM OF AN ALUMINUM BOAT? Does it have to be mixed or is it applied directly from the can? Can it be applied with a paint brush or roller?

Asked on 09/25/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

His address is mpgagnier using hotmail! They won't let me type it as a real address!!!

Answered on 09/27/2011 by GALE GAGNIER
See More Answers (6)

Answer

The gluvit has to be mixed and when it's mixed, it is a little running. It can be applied with a paint brush or roller and does have a smooth finis on the boat dependingon how thick it is applied. The paint adheres to the gluvit well, just make sure it is clean. As a suggestion, just apply it where you might think it's leaking. Doing the whole boat is expensive and don't think it's neccessary.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by MARK BORDEN

Answer

Please forward your question to my husband who used this product on our boat... his email will be on the next page! Thanks

Answered on 09/27/2011 by GALE GAGNIER

Answer

Gluvit does dry to a glossy finish , although I wouldn't call it high gloss . It is not a clear coat but seeks out cracks and crannys and will provide a very water tight hull . It is meant to have a coat of paint over it. It has a catalyst that must be mixed in to activate it. So do not mix more than you will use because you have 90 minutes to use it up. This is absolutely good stuff for sealing aluminum or steel or wood.

Answered on 09/26/2011 by ANN M VAUGHAN

Answer

it adds a yellow tint over whatever it is applied to or atleast it did on my boat. it has to be mixed as it is a two part type epoxy resin. its almost like adding a fiberglass shell over the boat. if you have any leaks in your boat this stuff will seal it. hope the info helps

Answered on 09/26/2011 by KEVIN SECKNER

Answer

I used Gluvit on the inside of my bass boat on all the rivets and seems, it worked great but it doesnt leave the best finish. It has a duller yellowish tone to it when it cures. I happened to use a brush due to where I applied it, but I'm confident you could roll it on if that is the avenue you wanted to go down! Finally, It is a two part product so it does need to be mixed.

Answered on 09/26/2011 by DANIEL SCHIMEL

Answer

Gluvit is applied directly from the can and it does not leave a high gloss finish. i applied mine with a brush. gluvit is primarily used as a sealant, not as a finish coat. i believe it can be covered with paint, but since it is somewhat flexible, i'd seek out the manufacturer recommendation. i applied gluvit to an older aluminum fish and ski hull as a sealant to the inside of the hull, not the outside. i works well for that purpose.

Answered on 09/26/2011 by CLYDE PEARCE
Answer Question

Question

I am restoring a wooden 19 ft daysailer sailboat. If I strip down the wood and use this product for the seams on the bottom of the boat, will it hold. Or, might it break lose from the wood as the boat twists. i know the product and have used it before on the inside of a boat while fibergalssing the outside bottom. This time I would like to not add so much weight to the boat; thus only doing the seams. What do you think---will it break free from the wood or not? Jared

Asked on 09/18/2012 by Alex Smythe

Top Answer

Thanks for your shared 'wisdom'. I think I will try it and use the epoxy paint both inside and outside. The last Lightening I 'did', i added too much weight in using the fiberglass mesh fabric on the bottom. Fingers crossed.

Answered on 01/03/2013 by Alex Smythe
See More Answers (5)

Answer

Thanks for your thoughts. I have rough sanded the bottom with 60 grit. You said what I was thinking--but I just haven't tried it ---and it's a lot of work if I'm wrong! Again, thanks a bunch for taking the time to reply.

Answered on 01/03/2013 by Alex Smythe

Answer

Forgave me for taking so long getting back to you. From my experience, I be leave it will work. If you clean the wood and make grooves or ruff the wood, so the sealer will get in the wood. If you don't, it would not have anything to catch a hold of. This Gluvit sealer is very strong, I have used it in some places that had a lot on presser on it and it has held up( 2 years) so far.

Answered on 10/24/2012 by JOHN T. GREINER

Answer

Hi Jared; I assume you're restoring a conventionally planked boat bottom. I would not recommend Gluvit for this. Gluvit is quite strong and doesn't compress, when the nice dry hull is launched the planking will absorb water, even through bottom paint, and swell, the seams will try to close up but the Gluvit won't allow it. Something has to give, probably the wood. Do you know how to caulk a seam with cotton and caulking? This would be a good thing to know if you like old wooden boats. If you were to use Gluvit in the seams and the planking is absolutely dry you need to keep water away from the wood with a couple of coats of epoxy inside and out, thinning the first coat so it absorbs into the wood and completely seals it. This adds very little weight since you're not using fiberglass. I did this with a hardworking 71 foot commercial motor yacht and its been dry and light for 12 years now and counting.

Answered on 10/21/2012 by BRIAN QUIN

Answer

I used it on a non-marine application. Actually used it to seal a 3/4" thick plywood bulkhead door on an old farmhouse. The door is subject to some serious rainfall due to lack of rain gutters and the same with snow load, being directly under the eves. So far, so good . I painted over it with a floor and deck enamel. Previous doors only lasted a few years. This door appears to be having a longer life.

Answered on 10/20/2012 by CARL LINDBERG

Answer

Thanks a bunch for taking the time to reply. I'm probably going to give it a shot--but making sure no water gets to bare wood anywhere both inside and outside.

Answered on 01/03/2013 by Alex Smythe
Answer Question

Question

dus it work on aluminum rivetted boats??

Asked on 09/05/2011 by Philip Lebrun

Top Answer

I used it on my aluminum riveted boat and it did the job. Just brushed it around the rivets and let it set up and cure. Boat didn't leak anymore. I previously had problems with "weeping" at the rivets . Gluvit is a good product and I highly recommend it.

Answered on 10/02/2011 by JERRY GLENN
See More Answers (4)

Answer

It did work on the rivets that were leaking, but I have a fairly big gap in the keel of my boat and it didn't even touch it. If you have very small leaks, it seems to be a good product, but if you have larger leaks, it's a waste of time and money.

Answered on 10/04/2011 by DENNIS RINGLEMAN

Answer

Yes it does. The key is to clean all paint, grease, and other debris from the seams and rivets. Read the instructions on mixing and application carefully. Have fun and all the best to you!

Answered on 10/03/2011 by FRANK ATAIYAN

Answer

Yes, what I did was use some epoxy putty that comes in a tube, put a small piece of it over the rotten rivet, let harden for an hour, then put a coat of gluvit on, then repeat the gluvit 24 hours later. Did the same on the outer transom aluminum sheet, patched small holes with putty, then 2 coats gluvit.

Answered on 09/07/2011 by CRAIG MORGAN

Answer

I used it on my 22 foot aluminum boat a year ago, along the keel and to seal the transom. I took my wife and 2 young boys out on Lake Superior. The transom failed due to Gluvit Epoxy not holding. In calm water the boat sank. My wife and sons drown, I made it back to shore. I'm living alone now. I would use Gluvit Epoxy again if necessary. Good luck Philip

Answered on 09/30/2011 by MORRIS LEWIS
Answer Question

Question

Does it dry clear?

Asked on 08/13/2016 by Charles Milazzo

Top Answer

I found that Marine-Tex Gluvit worked well in sealing small holes in my aluminum boat. It dried in no time and has held up to wear and tear. I found that it dried a smokey amber color but clear enough to see thru.

Answered on 08/13/2016 by THOMAS RIDEOUT
See More Answers (3)

Answer

A very thick coating dries light yellow. Thin might be almost transparent.

Answered on 08/13/2016 by PAUL DALY

Answer

Pretty much clear, a slight gray tint maybe.

Answered on 08/14/2016 by RICK MOORE

Answer

In my application I would say not real clear, but more of a sepia brownish clear. I would not apply over a finish I liked bright, for certain. I used it inside of an aluminum hull which will be hidden. I will likely use more on the outside of the hull and will plan to paint over the gluvit. Best, Paul

Answered on 08/13/2016 by PAUL HARVEY
Answer Question

Question

wood like to try this on a wooden boat, having some issues with the boat not being in the water enough for proper swelling. would want to apply to the bottom where the bottom comes together with the sides, can it then be painted ?

Asked on 08/02/2013 by tom HAGEMAN

Top Answer

I would call Jamestown for tech support on what the best product would be for your problem. If it's a nice boat you wouldn't want to use the wrong product. Fix it right and I would think fiberglass is the way go go.

Answered on 08/07/2013 by Andrew Lumley
See More Answers (3)

Answer

At this time we do not have a customer to answer your question. If you need assistance please contact customer service at 800-423-0030.

Answered on 08/02/2013 by Kevin V

Answer

Yes putting it on is a good idea but getting a nice smooth finish ready for painting was tougher. My issues were below the water line also, so asthetically it wasn't seen until the boat was out of water. I used it both inside and outside of the hull. Antifouling paint didn't adhere well.

Answered on 08/17/2013 by MICHAEL VEGA

Answer

thanks for the fed back, my issue is the boat no longer goes into the water in the spring and out in the fall giving it time to swell. if the copper bronze won't stick perhaps a red bottom paint may work.during the winter I will put it in the garage on tripods and do the bottom. using this material where i want to seal and then work on prepping for a coat of bottom paint thanks again

Answered on 08/25/2013 by tom HAGEMAN
Answer Question

Question

coverage?

Asked on 01/19/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

coverage is good, it is THICK though, but that is what you are buying it for to fill cracks, holes etc. And it is Great Stuff!

Answered on 02/26/2013 by SCOTT SHEARIN
See More Answers (3)

Answer

The answer is not as simple as your question. Gluvit is designed to fill cracks and crevices, even, in some cases, rotted wood. Its consistency is akin to room temperature honey so it depends on the porosity of your project. Be advised, though, the can you buy is only half full, allowing room to mix the two parts.

Answered on 02/26/2013 by BRIAN QUIN

Answer

I cover the bottom of both pontoons and no leaks

Answered on 02/26/2013 by MICHAEL M. CLANCY

Answer

Available in 2 lb and 8 lb kits. Expect a 2 lb unit of Gluvit to cover 25-35 square feet, when applied at 6-8 mils. An 8 lb unit covers 100-130 square feet at the same thickness. Qt = 2 lb unit ; Gal = 8 lb unit. Thank you.

Answered on 01/30/2013 by Kerry Souza
Answer Question

Question

Can this product be applied on wet area?

Asked on 12/24/2012 by W W

Top Answer

To tell you the truth, I never tried it. Everything I used it on was dry.

Answered on 12/26/2012 by JOHN T. GREINER
See More Answers (3)

Answer

In a word, no. Gluvit is an epoxy, a wet surface won't allow it to adhere.

Answered on 12/26/2012 by BRIAN QUIN

Answer

no it must be dry when applied, but it does NOT leak when dry and hard

Answered on 12/26/2012 by MICHAEL M. CLANCY

Answer

no the boat is on land so if use the product

Answered on 01/11/2013 by galen christy
Answer Question

Question

I have a steel external fuel tank for two cycle outboard motor. It has an intermittent leak (if such a thing is possible) at one seam. Can I use this on a fuel tank?

Asked on 12/24/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have an 17' Aluminum "V" bottom boat. This year I started noticing intermittent leaks at the seams then finally in the main bottom of the boat itself. It turned out to be a problem of dis-similar metals, electrolysis and general wear and tear. I searched for a product that might solve the problem. My search lead me to "Gluvit Epoxy Water Sealer". Once basic prep was completed I was able to apply the sealer on the entire bottom and up to the side rivits at the water line. I gave it a 2nd coat and let it dry. Entire process took about 1 hour. 24 hours later i tested the boat and not a single leak. The sealer dries to a rock hard finish that can be painted yet stays flexible not to crack under adverse riding conditions. I am very pleased with the results and I think it should have a similar results on your fuel tank. Once dry it doesn't seem to be effected by solvents. Only problem is that you must be prepared to do the entire job at the same time. Once the "activator" is added to the product the hardening process begins. Good Luck. Sal Martingano, Indialantic, Fl

Answered on 12/28/2011 by SAL MARTINGANO
See More Answers (3)

Answer

This is a great product for sealing the bottom of an aluminum boat. I used it on the bilge of an old wooden boat and it helped a bit. I would not think this is so good for a gas tank? I would think epoxy?

Answered on 12/27/2011 by RICHARD PETE

Answer

Sorry I don't know.

Answered on 01/01/2012 by GALE GAGNIER

Answer

No go to a mototcycle supply house or auto parts dealer and get a fuel tank repair coating kit

Answered on 12/27/2011 by ROBERT ARLET
Answer Question

Question

I have an 18' 1995 tracker interiors nice big motor no way to turn boat over.. Has anyone done their boat while on trailer and does it fill in seams and rivets when applied from the bottom?

Asked on 07/27/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have not actually done it "upside down" but I would try it. Work the sealer in as much as possible, cover with was paper and tape tight so it won't drip down. Once it sets remove the tape and wax paper. It may necessary to remove the wax paper with a sponge or otherwise rub it off. Good luck!

Answered on 08/04/2011 by JH BAHN
See More Answers (3)

Answer

I did a '65 Starcraft on the trailer from the inside, and this stuff works awesome! I don't take on a drop of water and have been in the Chesapeake in 2' chop, no problems.

Answered on 08/09/2011 by MATTHEW SPANGLER

Answer

Yes, I just used it on a 93 monark 19' riveted, great on rivets.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by CRAIG MORGAN

Answer

I did NOT use it in that type of application. I used it on a horizontal surface, and it worked easily and has been flawless. But I can't comment on your application. Sorry.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by BRUCE BAUMAN
Answer Question
1 of 7