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BoatLIFE GIT-Rot
$18.96In Stock
BoatLIFE GIT-Rot
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BoatLIFE GIT-Rot Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 36 Questions

Question

I have a beam that runs through the house and is exposed at the end. It is big (11" x 17"). The last 8 inches is compromised. Is this too big an area to use Git-Rot? Doug

Asked on 05/20/2015 by Doug Smith

Top Answer

No! I have done an entire boat keel that had extensive dry rot an it worked fine.

Answered on 05/21/2015 by JAMES KELLEY
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Thank you Vincent. I will give it a try. Have used it on boats before, but never on this big of job.

Answered on 05/21/2015 by Doug Smith

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I would say yes most beams are structural and I would not try to patch it with git rot.

Answered on 05/20/2015 by MATTHEW YOUNGER

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I don't have experience with this type of repair. I've used the stuff successfully for small repairs in 1/4" plywood on a boat bottom and also on non-structural areas on window sills. You will have to introduce the Git Rot in many areas all over the end of the beam. You need to create reservoirs for the epoxy to continue feeding into the damaged wood. I don't now how far it could penetrate. Sorry that's all I can offer.

Answered on 05/21/2015 by VINCENT ANDERSON

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Thanks James. I will give it a try.

Answered on 05/21/2015 by Doug Smith

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In that case yes I would try the git rot It works best in end grain otherwise drill the holes as directed it will cure and become very hard it is just a very thin epoxy

Answered on 05/20/2015 by MATTHEW YOUNGER

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Mathew, The area that I am trying to patch is not load bearing. The beam is probable 50 feet long and this portion hangs beyond the roof by a foot or two. Still not use Git-Rot

Answered on 05/20/2015 by Doug Smith
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Question

can it be sprayed?

Asked on 10/26/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

no. you drill small holes and inject a 2 part liquid.

Answered on 10/26/2014 by JOHN KAELBER
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I would say no you would not get enough product into the wood to soak in you have to drill holes in the rotted wood to get enough penetration

Answered on 10/27/2014 by MATTHEW YOUNGER

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Spray it if you want to but the whole idea of the product is to get it to penetrate into the wood not just make a film on the surface. This is not a sealant.

Answered on 10/26/2014 by Jeffrey Cross

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My plan is to pour it. Don't think spray would get it on thick enough. Had to soak into wood.

Answered on 10/26/2014 by PAT NOONAN

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I don't believe spraying it would be an effective use. To work properly it needs to penetrate the fibers of the wood. I had some stringers that were not too bad, but had a few spots that were a bit questionable. Drilling holes and filling those areas with the product seems to be the most effective way to use it. Then after it dried (a few days) I mixed some 2 part epoxy, finished filling, sanded, and fiberglassed. It worked well for me on that particular project.

Answered on 10/27/2014 by JOHN DOBBELAERE

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I don't know, as I have only used the suggested method of drilling holes into the rotted area and filling them repeatedly with Got Rot. Spraying might work if the rot is only a surface condition but I doubt that there would be sufficient penetration to deep rot.

Answered on 10/26/2014 by VINCENT ANDERSON
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Question

I need to make a repair to the top side of livewell. Can it be applied upside down without dripping?

Asked on 07/30/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have only used this product once but I seriously doubt that you can use it upside down. Perhaps if you mixed it with some sawdust it might thicken enough to stay put but I think the pot time would be too slow and at least some of it would drip out before it set . It is really designed to be put into drilled holes from the top. If you were to cover the drill hole after filling it with the GitRot you might be able to hold enough of it in to do the job but i'm not certain how you would do that. Perhaps a dowel driven into the hole: which is what I did on several horizontal holes. i left the dowels in place and just sawed them off flush. My only complaint was that I didn't buy enough. This stuff is not cheap but it will do what they say.

Answered on 07/31/2012 by Jeffrey Cross
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Answer

The product will drip. I drilled holes from above into ther rotted wood area without going all the way through the wood. This prevented it from dripping. It is a liquid when you make it and gravity will work on it.

Answered on 07/30/2012 by TOM BAILEY

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doubtful. It's very thin when mixed. You need to work with gravity.

Answered on 07/30/2012 by Matt McCay

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will dificultty. It is very liquid. What I woul suggest is letting the area dry out completely so it "sucks up" the liquidid as fast as possible. then use an injection syinge that cna be bought from West Systme. then fit the nossel of the syinge into the hole you drilled until you achive as tight a fit as possible then inject a small amount wait a few seconds before withdrawing the syinge for the west system to soak in then go to the next hole obviously conver the floor with wax paper then newpapaer on topp use glovees

Answered on 07/30/2012 by WILLIAM TOMKO

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No, it can't. It is applied as a viscous fluid that is intended to displace water from the wood and replace it and then solidify so that the wood becomes like fiberglass. After it is mixed, it becomes increasingly thick, but this happens fairly fast and once it is thick, it no longer flows to penetrate the wood. One drills small holes into the wood and then pours the GitRot into the holes to help it penetrate. You would have to be able to drill holes that go downwards at some angle.

Answered on 07/30/2012 by GEOFFREY BINGHAM

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It soaks in very fast but you will still have drips. Not sure if it would melt a sponge that may be worth a try. You could drill holes in the top of the well and try to pull the liquid in that way. The stuff works very well.

Answered on 07/30/2012 by BILL MARTIN
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Question

I have some rotted redwood decking and railing where they join together. Can the wood be damp and still work?

Asked on 08/23/2011 by Harry Carter

Top Answer

In my experience, tIve had good results with the Git Rot epoxy. It will cure in a damp situation, but the ultimate bond will not be as strong. It is far better to do whatever you can to dry the wet wood as much as possible using denatured alcohol, and /or a heat gun first. Then, dam up the area if possible to keep the epoxy from running out, (I like wax paper and tape) and apply the Git rot until the dried area soaks it up and is fully saturated. Good Luck Bud B.

Answered on 08/25/2011 by JOHN BADIALI
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Hi. Michael, Thank you for your reply to my question. My recollection from having used Git -Rot many years ago was that it had an affinity for following the moisture in the wood to make the joint even stronger. Have I perhaps recalled the name of the product that can do that incorrectly, and do you by any chance, know of any product that is able to harden damp wood into a solid bond??? Or do you know where I might search for such a product. Thank you for any further assistance that you may be able to render. With much appreciation, Harry Carter.

Answered on 08/26/2011 by Harry Carter

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Thank you very much for your imput, That helps a lot. Harry

Answered on 09/07/2011 by Harry Carter

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my last usage was on a french door which was damp. The git-rot worked well.

Answered on 09/06/2011 by Matt McCay

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The Dryer the beter but it will work if moist it just takes longer to cure.

Answered on 08/26/2011 by BRIAN BETTINGER

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I think it should be dry. I even use a heat gun to make sure.

Answered on 08/25/2011 by MICHAEL HENRY
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Question

Get rot. How long does it stays liquid after mixing?

Asked on 05/13/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It will be several hours.

Answered on 05/14/2016 by STAN WILSON
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Don't really know, but I never had it take a set while working with it.

Answered on 05/14/2016 by DON GROESCHNER

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I have not had a chance to use it yet, so cannot answer this question.

Answered on 05/14/2016 by NANCY GRAHAM

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I honestly do not recall exactly. I had an edge of Marine plywood under some fiberglass that was pretty rotted, maybe about 18 inches worth. It stayed plenty workable for that....at least 25 minutes I would say. But I think it remained liquid for a bit afterwards.

Answered on 05/13/2016 by SHAWN RENALDI

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I used Get Rot on a favorite garden bench. I don't remember exactly how long it stayed liquid but I had to make little "dams" to hold the product in place while it cured. It has a long pot life and was great for my repair. It flowed in to all the nooks and crannies.

Answered on 05/13/2016 by Vergil Young
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Question

stripped lag bolts in motor mount going toinstall dow rod and then pour in git rot this should work correct ?

Asked on 05/10/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I would think that thickened epoxy would be a better choice.

Answered on 05/11/2016 by TRIP VON HOFFMANN
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I have found Git Rot to be very strong and reliable. However I would need to see a diagram of this action before I could comment accurately on this.

Answered on 05/10/2016 by LEON JONES

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It worked well for me and made the wood better than new

Answered on 05/10/2016 by DAVID MORROW

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Not sure what you wish to accomplish. I used it to repair soft spots in the transom of my Lyman. May also work as a hardened epoxy. J B weld??

Answered on 05/10/2016 by JEFF DAVIS

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I would think so

Answered on 05/10/2016 by MATTHEW YOUNGER
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Question

Does Git-Rot have a shelf life once the containers are opened--but not mixed together?

Asked on 10/01/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

lasts several years unmixed

Answered on 10/03/2011 by RICHARD GOLD
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Unfortunately I used it all up and can't be of any help.

Answered on 10/03/2011 by JAMES VEIRS

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I don't believe so. I recently used some (2011) that I purchased in 2008 and it cured perfectly. I'd imagine if it's stored in a place where it doesn't get super hot or freezing it would last indefinitely.

Answered on 10/04/2011 by ROBERT SPIECE

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That's a question that I can't answer as my supply is depleted. And I'm not a chemist. I'd suggest going to the website and see if you can get an answer there.

Answered on 10/03/2011 by HERBERT DRAKE

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I had some that I used and then put what was left in my shed for around 6 months and when I went back to use it, it was fine. Still worked great....

Answered on 10/04/2011 by KEVIN BOSWORTH
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Question

wet wood?

Asked on 09/29/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I use it in dry wood.

Answered on 10/26/2011 by HARRY PAULSEN
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Yes -wet wood but the dryer it is the less time it takes to cure -dry it as much as you can first.

Answered on 09/30/2011 by BRIAN BETTINGER

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Unfortunately my Git Rot didn't work.It didn't harden. i was using it to fill voids in a wood storm window. i had a friend experienced in using epoxy, who also told me about Git Rot, and we concluded the proportons of the mix were wrong. i used a 3-1 mix of his epoxy.which worked. John Duby

Answered on 09/29/2011 by JOHN DUBY

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Not the best idea.

Answered on 09/29/2011 by ALAN BERNSTEIN

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Sorry, but I haven't ever used it on wet wood, so I can't answer your question. It does work great on very old soft and rotting wood. We've come across a few areas in the keel of our 1950's Mahogany Cuiser that were very soft and we could not get down into the area to completely remove the soft wood. When saturated with the Git-Rot, it set it up like concrete! Life Saver.

Answered on 09/30/2011 by REBECCA CANNON
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Question

Can you use git rot on log railings and then stain them?

Asked on 06/10/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I haven't tried staining. I have only used paint over it. Sorry.....

Answered on 06/10/2016 by LEON JONES
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Answer

My experience with Git Rot is that it stops rot and gives strength to the blighted area. Mainly used it in the plywood areas and strength was acceptable. I am not sure on a railing because forces are different but in theory it should work.

Answered on 06/10/2016 by Betty Carlisle

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Don't know I used it on a boat transom and painted it. It works great.

Answered on 06/12/2016 by DAVID MORROW

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Sorry, can't help. I have only used it on rotting window frames, with great results.

Answered on 06/10/2016 by ROBERT WHITACRE
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Question

can this be applied with a sprayer?

Asked on 08/29/2015 by james king

Top Answer

I don't think this would work with a conventional sprayer, as the viscosity is quite high. Better to brush it. I also found that it worked best when it was used to penetrate into the wood as opposed to being a surface treatment.

Answered on 08/29/2015 by VINCENT ANDERSON
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I would say no

Answered on 08/30/2015 by MATTHEW YOUNGER

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Probably but what's the point? The idea behind this is to penetrate the fibers of the wood by allowing it to infiltrate from the inside: thus the drilling. If you just put it on the surface, unless you are spraying it on endgrain, it won't go anywhere: it will just stay there. It will toughen up the top but do nothing for the interior rot.

Answered on 08/29/2015 by Jeffrey Cross

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I've injected this into rotted wood by drilling numerous holes. I can't see how spraying would work.

Answered on 08/29/2015 by Paul Neureuter
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