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Redtree Badger Hair Brushes
$15.79In Stock
Badger Hair Brushes, badger hair paint brush
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Based on 36 Reviews
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Redtree Badger Hair Brushes Customer Questions and Answers

9 of 9 Questions

Question

I heard a lot about Badger brushes. Are they really the best for applying varnishes and top coats?

Asked on 07/13/2011 by Gerald Katen

Top Answer

I honestly don't know whether they're the "best". However, they flow well, cover well, leave an excellent surface without loose bristles, and clean up so you can reuse them. I recommend them.

Answered on 07/15/2011 by ROBERT FEWKES
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Answer

The badger brushes hold a lot of varnish and apply it smoothly. You don't have to stop in the middle of any board less than 6-8 feet to refill the brush. So the finish applied is about as flat as you can get without spraying.

Answered on 07/15/2011 by MICHAEL LAUER

Answer

Badger Hair brushes are superior brushes for finsh work. They are the most commonly used brush for applying two part urethane coatings. Then are used when rolling the paint to tip the overlaps between roller marks. this along with varnishes and other finish paints make them an excellent choice for pulling through your coats and leaving no brush marks. Just a nice clear finish. You should read up on how to tip an awlgrip type coating as the same principals apply to the other finshes. I have even used foam brushes to apply my varnish then tipped it out with a badger hair brush. Hope this helpful.

Answered on 07/18/2011 by KENNETH ZEGHIBE

Answer

Gerald, I build kayaks to fine furniture and I am a true believer in using the best of materials. For varnish, I only use badger or some other excellent brushes. Good luck

Answered on 07/17/2011 by HAROLD ELSTON

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I've laid down a lot of varnish on many different projects. I wouldn't use anything else, and have tried.

Answered on 07/15/2011 by LEIGH TUTTLE

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After solely using foam brushes for many years, switching to badger brushes was a welcome change. They certainly require maintenance after each use, but in my opinion, it's worth the trouble. The brush holds more varnish, gives a better and more consistent flow, and provides a smoother coat. I am very pleased with my badger brushes.

Answered on 07/16/2011 by NATHAN BAYREUTHER

Answer

Gerald- I can't say if they are the best or not but I nave never used a better brush for varnish. I recently finshed a boat hull with the badger brush I purchased from JD and a high dollar varnish, also from JD. Best level finish I have experienced. These brushes hold the varnish well and flow it out on the surface without ridges that need to level out. The boat was for a customer who fell in love with the clear coat finish. I plan to use it on the kayak I am building.

Answered on 07/15/2011 by COASTAL WOODWORKS
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Question

These brushes are listed by the manufacturer as "Badger style china bristles." Sounds fishy to me,. Can anyone verify that these are in fact badger hair bristles? Thanks.

Asked on 03/09/2012 by Bob Simmons

Top Answer

It's not something I could answer without seeing the bristles. "Badger-style China bristles" is a nearly meaningless description, as any brush seller could conceivably make that claim. BUT this looks like a nice brush. I've been using RedTree brushes for a long time and like them. That's what counts - I like them and get really fine results. In any case, good varnish work is not created by the brush, it's user technique that gets results.

Answered on 03/09/2012 by ROBERT A BEEBE
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Answer

Had I to guess, I would have to say that they are china bristle brushes dyed to look like they were made from badger hair. Thank you modern marketing!

Answered on 03/11/2012 by MARK WILLIAMS

Answer

Thanks Eric, I have to say I wasn't expecting the quality responses I received - first time I've used this. Much appreciated.

Answered on 03/15/2012 by Bob Simmons

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Robert, Thanks for taking the time to respond to my question re. badger hair bristles/Red Tree brushes, I appreciate your input.

Answered on 03/15/2012 by Bob Simmons

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Hello Mark, Thanks for responding to my question, I appreciate it.

Answered on 03/15/2012 by Bob Simmons

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Hey Bob, I bought a set of these about 20 years ago. They have been great brushes for virtually all finish types, but don't use the same bruch for clear and pigmented finishes. I bought another set recently and am not at all happy. The brush contains about 50% as much bristle as the old ones, and it is definitely NOT badger hair. For the price, they're still not bad. A 3" Badger Hair brush will set you back $50-$60 and I only know of one source in the mid-west that carries them.

Answered on 03/09/2012 by ERIK SILVESTRI
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Question

Is this a "pseudo badger" brush? Not real badger bristle, but a natural bristle bleached and dyed to look like badger hair?

Asked on 06/18/2015 by Oliver Filippi

Top Answer

They are not badger hair. According to Redtree they are a man made bristle. If you want true badger you will pay upwards of $40 for 1 1/2 inch wide brush.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by GARY SOWARD
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These are Badger hair style china bristle brushes.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by Rick White

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It appears to be real to me. I would be surprised if it was fake with the color patterns that appear in the bristles.

Answered on 07/04/2015 by JOHN DAVID HEINZMANN

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This brush did a great job and appears to be real.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by EDWARD DEMELLIER
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Question

Are badger hair brushes the best bet for varnishing?

Asked on 04/06/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I think they are great. They hold varnish well and distribute it evenly. They are fairly short bristled and are somewhat stiff compared to paint brushes but that works well with varnish especially when you are cutting in. I find I can do my entire Chris Craft with a 3" brush. They are nor cheap, so take good care of them and they will take good care of you.

Answered on 04/06/2012 by TOM WISS
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Answer

Absolutely! I have built boats and varnished them as well as other wood projects with badger hair brushes, foam brushes and cheap brushes. Badger hair brushes work the best. Remember to lay varnish from dry to wet, not wet to dry and you'll be amazed at your own work.

Answered on 04/06/2012 by KIM HODGES

Answer

I have used badger hair brushes for years. They do work the best for applying an even coat of varnish at the proper coat thickness. Have minimal 'tipping off' to do as few air bubbles in the coat. If you are only doing a very small area the foam brushes are OK and you get to avoid cleanup but the foam quickly deteriorates and you will get foam particles in the coat

Answered on 04/06/2012 by MIKE KELLEY
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Question

how to clean after varnish?

Asked on 06/10/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I don't clean my brushes after using them. Before use I drill a hole through the base of the handle just above the ferrule. Then I cut a six inch piece of coat hanger. The brush hangs off the coat hanger, which is stuck through the hole, and it is suspended in a coffee can full of turpentine. Then I put a large Ziploc bag over the whole thing to keep dust out. When I'm ready to use the brush again I simply spin it out using a brush spinner. Brushes last me at least three seasons and I only use them in the spring. The rest of the time they are hanging in the turpentine.

Answered on 06/12/2012 by WILL TRACEY
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Answer

After many years of so-so results cleaning badger hair brushes, I bought a brush spinner. First I use old newspaper or a rag to squeeze out as much varnish as possible. Then I rinse the brush in thinner and spin it in a cardboard box. I repeat that step three times, saving the used thinner in a jug where I decant it for use later cleaning paint brushes. After the third spin. I either wash the brush in dish or laundry detergent, rinse it thoroughly, spin it dry and wrap it in a paper towel, or suspend it in linseed oil or fresh thinner if I plan to use it again soon.

Answered on 06/11/2012 by TOM SCHMITT
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Question

Tech Support, I have applied five coats of Epifanes Rapid Clear to the exterior Teak trim on my sailboat that sail on the Chesapeake Bay. Epifanes guidance seems to encourage users to apply a final coat or two of real varnish as a final coat. Can I stop coating the boards and enjoy the fine finish I have developed with Rapid Clear or should I add a coat or two of Schooner varnish ? Thanks for help, Richard Paden

Asked on 05/27/2018 by Boat name: Petite Cherie from Severna Park, Maryland - Chesapeake Bay

Top Answer

It is up to you really, but they recommend the varnish overcoat for the full 'varnished look' of the wood, and enhanced UV.

Answered on 06/18/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Question

To begin the tipping process - do I wet the brush with paint - or do I start dry and allow it to pull from the ridges after rolling?

Asked on 09/07/2017 by Doug from Missouri

Top Answer

Dip the dry brush in the thinner used with the paint, pad it dry on a rag. Be sure to roll out thin coats, if you are moving paint with the brush it is too thick. If the roller or brush is dragging, you need to add more thinner.

Answered on 03/09/2018 by JD Tech Team
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Question

are your "badger hair" brushes truly made of real badger hair?

Asked on 07/22/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I don't believe so, they are a "Badger Hair" style china bristle.

Answered on 07/22/2015 by Rick White
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Question

how to tip varnish?

Asked on 06/10/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I put the varnish on with back and forth or even x-shaped strokes being careful to get complete coverage but not have excess (that's always the difficult balance). I then stretch the varnish out from my left to my right onto new areas to rid the current area of excess, using horizontal left to right strokes. Once convinced I have no excess I brush it back into the old wet edge using right to left horizontal strokes. Then I check for holidays (areas which don't have consistent coverage). Finally, I tip from bottom to top - vertically - very lightly. It also helps to mix in some penetrol with the varnish prior to starting.

Answered on 06/12/2012 by WILL TRACEY
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