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Galvanized Steel Shoulder Eye Bolts w/ Threaded Lag Screw
$12.32In Stock
Shoulder Eye Bolts Lag Screw Thread Galvanized Steel
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Galvanized Steel Shoulder Eye Bolts w/ Threaded Lag Screw Customer Questions and Answers

6 of 6 Questions

Question

what is the weight bear load on this bolt in the largest size (thread length 2-1/2inches)?

Asked on 07/22/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

They technically don't rate the wood screws for load bearing, because they are unable to rate the interface between the threads and the wood. Pine would be different from Walnut or Oak, etc. It seems reasonable to take the load ratings from their identically-sized machine screws and apply to these, with the understanding that the rating only applies to breakage of the screw and not to it potentially pulling out from the wood it's screwed into. Disclaimer: I am not a structural or mechanical engineer and have no ability to guarantee the structural integrity of anything whatsoever. So, if you're looking at the 2.5-inch size of the 3/8" (diameter) screw, the corresponding rating would be 1,200 pounds at a safety factor of 5:1. If the load is pulling at an angle (rather than straight out, parallel to the screw), you may need to derate it by up to 90%. If you're using a different size, find the same-sized Chicago Hardware machine screw. Find the size screw you're looking at, then find the corresponding (same-sized) machine-thread version, which will have a load rating. But keep in mind, again, that this rating does not apply to the interface with the wood, and must be derated if the screw is used at an angle. Really, the short version of this answer is: wood screws don't have load bearing ratings. Best of luck!

Answered on 07/23/2014 by JUSTIN BARTLETT
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Answer

I have no idea. You would have to ask the manufacturer, and I suspect they will not tell you because that would depend heavily on what it is screwed into. If it was screwed into a piece of solid oak it would hold a lot more than normal pine/fir framing. And it would also depend on how carefully you drilled the pilot hole. And it also depends on the direction of pull. But it is still just a fancy lag screw, not a through bolt with a nut and washer on the other end. My gut says don't put much more than 50 pounds on it, but don't quote me on that. I'm using mine to hold a rope that goes to the corner of an outdoor sunshade/awning, and I suspect the load is only about 15-20 pounds max with a spring in the line to absorb shock loads, and mine is screwed into a piece of white oak that is the lifting beam at the peak of a small barn. Also be aware that my German family motto for building things is "Hell fur strong" Besten Gluck! (Good luck!)

Answered on 07/22/2014 by BRIAN LAUX

Answer

Sorry, i done know. The answer varies based on the application, material it is fastened to and the angle at which tension is applied.

Answered on 07/23/2014 by ERNEST MILANI

Answer

I am curious about why Jamestown thinks that a customer can answer a question about the technical specification of their product. I am unable to answer your question. The manufacturer's data sheet should provide your answer.

Answered on 07/23/2014 by RICHARD CORBEILLE

Answer

I don't have any of knowing. I only have about 75lb on them but the force is not straight down - more sideways. I would look on the internet for load bearing capacity for a bolt 5/8" diameter/2-1/2" thread length. I would bet there is something there.

Answered on 07/22/2014 by PHILIP FINE
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Question

Which thread type using for Shoulder Screw Eye Bolts? (Example: G-275 Screw Eye Bolt)

Asked on 06/27/2014 by Balaji Selvam

Top Answer

We used the lag screw thread in this instance because the backside of the timber we were installing it on was not accessible. My first choice for eye bolts is always a machine thread, through drilled with a backer washer or plate and nut. In this case it was not possible, and loading was not a factor.

Answered on 06/27/2014 by JAY HENDERSON
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Answer

Don't quite understand what you are looking for, but the tread type is what you see in the display, G-275 For direct fastening to mostly wood constructions. Obviously, nuts or washers are not needed, these are not machine eye bolts. Sorry, but I don't understand your question? WYSIWYG.....

Answered on 06/27/2014 by MARSHALL GRANT

Answer

Sorry that I can't be of much help since this piece of hardware was installed by a local handyman with whom I no longer have contact. It was purchased for the purpose of holding a boxing heavy bag, not for any boating use.

Answered on 06/28/2014 by EVELYN FARBSTEIN
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Question

I plan to screw this into a 4 x 4 and hang a loft from the ceiling (one corner only) I think the total weight will be less than 500 lbs, will this work ??

Asked on 01/27/2014 by Olie smildzins

Top Answer

Olie, I would look to use a through bolt, drilled and secured with washer, lock washer and nut, to depend on the threads to hold your loft seems to ask a lot from the screw. just a thought.

Answered on 01/28/2014 by KEVIN TAYLOR
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Answer

Yes it will. I assume 4 bolts will be used. Be sure to properly pre drill all holes of course.

Answered on 01/28/2014 by MARK GRYGLAS

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Maybe. I'm quite certain the lag screw itself can handle that amount of weight but the most pressing issue is how it is screwed in and the direction of the weight involved. Mine are used at a right angle to the threads.

Answered on 01/28/2014 by MICHAEL NOYES
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Question

What drill bit size should I use for these (in a masonry wall)?

Asked on 05/01/2012 by S G

Top Answer

Unfortunately I put these into white oak so will not be able to comment on masonry wall.....Sorry

Answered on 05/02/2012 by DANIEL O'BRIEN
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I have only used them in wood.

Answered on 05/03/2012 by RICHARD FEARN

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I wouldn't try and use a lag "screw" in masonry. Screws are meant for use in material that will deform (wood metal plastic etc.) I think the masonry will crack or crumble. Most masonry fasteners are meant to wedge. Just my humble opinion, I would look for something else.

Answered on 05/02/2012 by BRIAN SAIIA
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Question

how many is in a box ?

Asked on 10/26/2011 by anna gunn

Top Answer

I just bought two seperately (no box). Good quality, happy with them.

Answered on 10/26/2011 by WILLIAM HAWTHORNE
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Answer

The price is per each. Yikes, these seem expensive but they are more trustworthy than the kind of bolt that is merely bent into a circle. I pre-drill into the center of the overhead beam and epoxy (West brand) them in... very secure.

Answered on 10/26/2011 by Steven Szarawarski

Answer

We only bought four loose eyebolts - they weren't in a box. Graham (not Roger!)

Answered on 10/26/2011 by ROGER HARPUM C/O MEYER SOUND LABORATORIE
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Question

what weight can it hold? use would be for anchoring a swing to a joist

Asked on 04/08/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

At this time we do not have a customer to answer your question. If you need assistance please contact customer service at 800-423-0030.

Answered on 04/10/2013 by Kevin V
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