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TotalBoat 2 Part Polyurethane Flotation Foam
$56.99In Stock
TotalBoat 2-Part Polyurethane Flotation Foam 2 lb. Density 2-Quart Kit
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TotalBoat 2 Part Polyurethane Flotation Foam Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 58 Questions

Question

I've got a lightweight custom made fiberglass kayak with a very thin fiberglass skin, I'd like to pour this into each end for boyancy, would you see any problems doing this? I'd stand the kayak upright and pour into the end, it should allow for expansion upward without side pressure...right?

Asked on 09/29/2012 by Joe Three

Top Answer

Not a problem Joe. You have given the foam an area to expand without undue pressure on the boat skin. ng

Answered on 10/03/2012 by NEAL GANSER
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Thanks for the reply, I'm going to give this a try.

Answered on 10/02/2012 by Joe Three

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As long as there is an outlet. It expands fast especially if its warm out.

Answered on 10/02/2012 by DANIEL HAMEL

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be very carefull foam can expand and rupture the glass . I have seen this on floors in boats where the glass is much thicker. proceed with caution;

Answered on 10/02/2012 by EARNEST BOTTOMS

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I used this product to fill in the middle of a paddle boat (replacing soggy styrofoam). Since it sets up quickly, I added the mix in several small batches, which passively filled the space available. The resulting layers seemed to bond well. At the end as space was more restricted, there did not appear to be any side pressure, just a little more density to the final production. If you are simply filling space without a restricting compartment, there should be no problem with side pressure, though you might consider a loosely covering sheet of hard plastic to serve as protecting surface?

Answered on 10/02/2012 by PHILIP MATTHEIS

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THANKS everybody for the answers, I'm ordering the product tonight, and will post results when I'm done, I'm thinking this will work just fine ... I'm not wanting to add additional weight to my kayak, but the added weight is better than being stranded 4 miles upriver with a limestone hole in the bottom and floatation that didn't work, a tough lesson learned!

Answered on 10/06/2012 by Joe Three

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Jim - I used the foam to replace soggy foam under a floor on a 16 ft High Tide. After laying new plywood I made sure to cut expansion hole to control the excess foam and it worked well. Pouring small batches with the kayak standing vertically I think should work well. Good luck! Paul

Answered on 10/04/2012 by Paul Conrads

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Yes Joe, that will work just make your calculations so you don't over pour also be prepared to work very fast and its messy

Answered on 10/02/2012 by JAMES GATTO

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This will work well for buoyancy. The foam will expand in the path of least resistance. If you pour a large amount at a time, that path of least resistance will be to push the fiberglass out. This is because the 'skin' will cure first, and resist the expansion of the core of the foam. Pour mulitiple small batches (4oz) at a time in layers to prevent damaging your work.

Answered on 10/02/2012 by JAMES GRIMES

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Might work. I used it on a 19 foot fiberglass boat with a solid hull and floor. I put around six four inch holes in the floor about 2.5 feet apart, and the foam expanded to fill the floor and through the holes as planned. The expansion is significant, you will need to experiment with a small batch. Again make sure to leave plenty of holes for expansion, and maybe even consider mixing and pouring in steps. If the fiberglass wall is too thin to channel the mixture excess out the holes, the foam expansion will easily break a thin skin. Also be aware the product is messy, so plan ahead with disposable gloves and containers...and wear a mask or work in open air.

Answered on 10/02/2012 by ROGER SCHWARZ
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Question

I have a 16' aluminium boat 6 wide, I want to fill the bottom with about 2 inches of Flotation Foam. I can only get to about 10 ft for the floor decking. So I want to fill 10 ft x 6 ft by 2inches of foam. How much product would i need? Do you have to prime the bottom of the floor before adding the foam? What is required to get the foam to stick to the aluminium floor? Thanks Ken R

Asked on 01/07/2013 by Ken Riddle

Top Answer

I don' think this product would work for what you want. I used it to fill a void. Good luck

Answered on 01/08/2013 by ROBERT HENNE JR
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Ken, I used the two part foam a couple of years ago to replace the "water-logged" foam my boat's previous owner removed. I needed only one gallon to fill an 18inch by 6.5 foot long section about 4inches deep. I suspect you will need two gallons. My suggestion would be to work in small batches. Like any two part mix I have ever used the greater the quantity you mix at once the faster it wants to set. This caused me problems. It sets faster than you think. I would not worry about priming as long as the aluminum you want it to stick to is clean. I had more problems getting it off what I did not want it on than the other way around. Think tar or epoxy. This stuff holds with tenacity. Good luck- Jeff W

Answered on 01/08/2013 by JEFFREY WOOD

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I used this foam under the deck of a fiberglass ski boat. The dimensions of the void I was filling is about 8ft long by 3 foot wide and about 4 inches deep. I used about a gallon of product. I found this foam stuck to any surface without priming.

Answered on 01/08/2013 by JAY SCHELL

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A quart kit shows that it would cover 2 cubic ft (13824 cubic inches). Your space is 17280 cubic inches so it would require 2 quart kits. If your work space is less than 80 degrees, you won't get as much expansion. The foam will expand up and out. If you need to maintain a 2" thickness, you will need to restrict it. If you put too much mix into a restricted area, you can cause the aluminum to bow under the pressure. I had painted the inside of the boat and adhesion was not a problem. I don't believe that it would be necessary if the bottom is wiped down, clean and dry. I used a solo red cup to mix and pour - seemed to be the right size to handle at one time. Just use a new cup each batch.

Answered on 01/08/2013 by LYNN CLARK

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Hey Ken, To answer your question about how much foam will be required, the expansion of the foam is very dependant on the temp of the boat and air when the foam is mixed and applied...the temp should be between 80 and 90 degrees to get the most expansion. The foam will stick to any grease free surface. Make sure the plywood is secured in place before adding the foam, given that the foam has expansion pressure and will lift the plywood if it is not held in place. Given the area you have described, the (2) quart size will work fine, when you add the foam, I would stand the boat up on the transom and pour from the bow, then while working quickly, lower the bow and roll the boat from side to side, taking no more than 1 minute total, then let it set and watch the foam expand. Do not further move the boat until the foam has completely dried, at which time you can easily trim any expanded foam. Great product if used properly.

Answered on 02/23/2013 by ROBERT HOLMSTROM

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foam is very heat sensitive. the amount you will need depends on the temperature you plan to use it at. I dont even try to foam below 80 degrees and even then i heat part a and b up to about 120.0 also preheat the part you plan to foam if it below 80. I would think that a gallon should do the job. it will adhere to the wood and aluminum without doubt. after it cures to remove you will need a flat pry bar or some type of flat chisel. so dont worry about it sticking. The real question is are you going to fasten the plywood down prior to foaming. hope this helps. Ernie at Ernie's fiberglass boat repair.

Answered on 01/07/2013 by EARNEST BOTTOMS

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The space I filled with foam was about 11' by eight inches to an average depth of 4". I used approximately 3 quarts on this job. Sound like 2 quarts might do it. As for adhesion to aluminum, I think I might spray or brush in a layer of epoxy resin just to be safe, though I think this stuff sticks to almost anything. Hope this helps. Tim S

Answered on 01/07/2013 by TIM SMITH
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Question

If I overfill the cavity, can I use, for example, an electric plane to remove the excess?

Asked on 04/11/2018 by Smitty from WI

Top Answer

Absolutely. Most saws or rasps will cut right through this foam, and for very fine shaping you can even us a sander.

Answered on 06/04/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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It will cut easily. You can also trim it off with a sawsall, handsaw, or a sharp knife. Cheers, Capt'n Marty

Answered on 04/11/2018 by martymorse

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I was easily able to trim it when I used it in my boat. I don't know how a electric planer works but I trimmed my excess product with a sharp knife. It's a great product !

Answered on 04/12/2018 by leechd61

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I imagine you could. The foam is a hard granular type foam on curing. I filled a forward compartment and used a hand saw to slice it off flush with the bulkhead and cleats.

Answered on 04/12/2018 by stweandjaw

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It is easy to cut off excess, I used a long knife. It cuts easily.

Answered on 04/12/2018 by dfossella

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Yes, or cut with a hand saw or knife.

Answered on 04/12/2018 by colindawsonarchitect
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Question

Can you fiberglass over cured foam?

Asked on 10/13/2015 by jim tetler

Top Answer

Yes you can with either epoxy or polyester resin. Jack

Answered on 10/15/2015 by JOHN MENGES
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I haven't tried it, but once the foam sets or cures, I don't see why not. The question should be, can you fiberglass over foam? Once cured, that's all it is.

Answered on 10/13/2015 by Steven Silva

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Yes you can, just make sure the foam is completely cured

Answered on 10/13/2015 by EDWIN WARNER

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I repaired a Boston Whaler using foam to fill voids after a bow section ripped off. I then fiberglassed the section to the hull. This was 2 years ago. So far I can see no deterioration and the repair seems solid. Hope this helps.

Answered on 10/13/2015 by SAMUEL WAKEMAN

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Only with epoxy resin.

Answered on 10/13/2015 by CARTER SKEMP

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yes you can i did works grate

Answered on 10/13/2015 by RONALD QUARELLA
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Question

i have a 21 foot flats boat that i am rebuilding, i am tryn to figure out the amount of foam i would need to fill the cavity underneth the deck. my measurments are, 4 sections that are 15'L*16"W*10"H and there are three stringers that split up these cavitys?

Asked on 05/23/2012 by fred perales

Top Answer

My cubic foot was 2 long cavities of 8' L x 16" W x 9" H divided by 2 because of the triangular shape of the hull (13,824 sq ft) and I used 1 unit of the 2 Gallon Flotation Foam. I use it all, nothing left on the cans. Just using your dimensions you have 28,800 sq ft. You would need double the quantity for your project (2 units of 2 gallons). When working on it install the desk and 1/2" hole in the deck pour the foam and wait until it drys. Then layout you fibreglass in top of the wood deck. Good luck.

Answered on 05/24/2012 by OMAR VAZQUEZ
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lynn is that 8 gallons total mixed or 8 gallons of each part?

Answered on 05/23/2012 by fred perales

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Fred My understanding is that the expansion is 10-12 times the volume but varies with temperature. I have bought the goods but have not used it yet.

Answered on 05/23/2012 by WILLIAM DOYLE

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I found that if the foam was mixed at recommended temps, the yield was as described. 8 cubic feet/gallon. With your measurements, it would require 8 gallons assuming you are to foam up to the floor. That would give you up to 4000lb of flotation which is probably far more than you need. It might be better to figure the weight of the boat sitting on the water and foam based on weight to float it incase of an accident. If you are going to foam the cavities full, you will need to make some kind cover to keep the foam from expanding over the top of the stringers. I used some plywood covered with poly to make it easy to remove. I have also seen people use some pieces of closed cell house foundation foam as a filler to take up space as it is much cheaper than the expanding foam. The trade off is that the foam boards tend to be noisey unless encapsulated in the expanding foam. Good Luck.

Answered on 05/23/2012 by LYNN CLARK

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My best suggestion is to start with small batches and keep adding till you get the right amount. i poured on top of a cured batch. You can cut the foam with a saw if it gets too high. Good luck

Answered on 05/24/2012 by ROBERT HENNE JR
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Question

How many cubic feet do you get out of the one quart package?

Asked on 03/15/2012 by Lou G

Top Answer

Lou, I bought the 1 gal kit. It covered, I believe, a space 17" x 4'. But, have the area prepared. Ex, if placing under your deck...cut a 6" access hole and a 1" relief hole. This will allow the escaping air not to slow down the mixed foam from spreading. And, you MIGHT have about 30 seconds between the actual start of pouring into the access hole before it starts to thicken. Be very fast, use a mixing paddle in a drill, then pour. Wear gloves and 3M, or equilivent, chemical/dust mask and safety goggles. I had first bought the 1 qt kit but it was not enough to fill my area. But, Jamestown, has some experts working for them and they can give you advice about how much you will need for your project. My project was a Tolman Alaskan Skiff. Flotation between the stringers and hull below decks. Also, in the collision chamber at bow. It took about 4 gallons. Good luck. Speed in pouring and correct temp surrounding and temp of foam is essential. Too hot it will kick off too soon. To cold it will not foam up very well. Jim

Answered on 03/23/2012 by JAMES BALDWIN
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Answer

Lou, The key is to use the product with at least 75 degrees temp. I have used the product with both hotter, (as hot as 85 degrees), and as cool as 70 degrees. The total expansion was near the posted amount at 85 degrees and about 10% less expansion than posted at 70 degrees. Also, please note that you will have surprising expansion force with the foam, so have everything epoxied with at least 6 oz glass. Another tip is to pour in the foam and rotate the cavity around so you can coat as much of the possible surface area quickly, then let it set and watch it expand without moving it any further. After it was fully cured, I sealed in the foamed area as to eliminate water saturation. My 12 year old son and I built a scratch built plywood boat that is 7'-6" long with a beam of 4'-1" that has 340 lbs of foam boyancy, is completely drivable with more than 500 lbs of people and full of water at the same time with a 3.5 hp Merc 4-stroke engine. It was a great project. I will be submiting photos for the contest this weekend. Best of luck with your project and I would use the foam again and recommend it.

Answered on 03/23/2012 by ROBERT HOLMSTROM

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Have not used the product yet but was a foam manufacturer. 1 qrt of 2.5 lb density foam should grow into about 6 gal of finished product x .1337 = .8 cu ft.

Answered on 03/23/2012 by NEAL GANSER

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Lou, The key is to use the product with at least 75 degrees. I have used the product both hotter, (as hot as 85 degrees,) and as cool as 70 degrees. the total expansion was near the posted amount at 85 degrees and about 10% less expansion than posted at 70 degrees. Also, please note that you will have surprising expansion force with the foam, so have everything epoxied with at least 6 oz glass. Another tip is to pour in the foam and rotate the cavity around so you can coat as much of the surface area quickly, then let it set and watch it expand without moving it any further. After it was fully cured, I sealed in the foamed area as to eliminate water sateration. My 12 year old son and I build a scratch built plywood boat that is 7'-6" long with a beam of 4'-1" that has 340# of boyancy, is completly drivable with more than 500 lbs of people and full of water at the same time with a 3.5 hp merc 4-stroke engine. It was a great project. I will be submiting photos for the contest this weekend. Best of luck with your project and I would recommend the foam.

Answered on 03/23/2012 by ROBERT HOLMSTROM

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Lou, I used the foam to inject between flooring / seating and hull bottom of a fiberglass sail boat. Because of injecting in a closed space I can not verify all voids were filled. The foam seemed to react very well, actually faster than expected. The expansion seemed adequate but I have no way to verify the actual. Al

Answered on 03/23/2012 by AL RITTER
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Question

I see from the specs that foam throws off up to 130 degrees F while curing. Is this hot enough to soften or weaken cured epoxy that was used in fiberglassing the space where I intend to apply the foam?

Asked on 08/26/2018 by Jim from NJ

Top Answer

It should not be a problem over cured epoxy.

Answered on 08/27/2018 by JD Tech Team
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No.

Answered on 08/27/2018 by foxislandave

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Yes, this can soften epoxy. Technically, I believe most epoxy is good for 150 degrees. I know a couple builders that say to use it in a sacrificial mold or sacrificial hull. Both said that most of the time it is fine, but they have destroyed a couple hulls. I have used it in flotation seat tanks with no issues. I have a hull I want to use it on and bought the product again, I think it is great stuff. I am on the fence about the risk.

Answered on 08/27/2018 by canoewnc

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I did not use large quantity and it did throw off some warmth, however  I do not feel it would get hot enough to damage cured resin.

Answered on 08/28/2018 by swcoin
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Question

I have an old town 146 canoe and would like to fill up part of the bow and stern with flotation foam. Should I use 2lb or 6lb density foam?

Asked on 08/16/2018 by J from undisclosed

Top Answer

The 2# is for flotation.

Answered on 08/16/2018 by JD Tech Team
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For flotation, 2 pound. Heavier densities would provide greater strength but with the loss of a portion of the flotation.

Answered on 08/16/2018 by joshkaptur

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I have used 2lb in my canoes and Kayaks.

Answered on 08/16/2018 by jlill0439

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⁣My guess is that the 2lb contains more air and would produce more floatation.  It is more fragile than the 6lb, however, so the 6lb would better handle kicks or knocks from paddles. The 2lb can be cut and shaped easier after curing.  The 6lb is like plastic after curing. Both foams expand a lot so you probably don`t need the gallon size for a canoe. Heat is a factor in the reaction time and the amount of expansion.  Don't pour them in 90 deg direct sunlight or on 65 deg nights!

Answered on 08/17/2018 by chip.brackin
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Question

would this foam be suitable for adding flotation to a rotomolded polyethylene kayak?

Asked on 06/16/2015 by John Lewis

Top Answer

I believe Flotation Foam will work for use in a rotomolded kayak, provided care is taken in not over-filling the space. I recommend checking the amount of foam expansion in a container prior to using in the kayak.

Answered on 06/17/2015 by TIM SMITH
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Thanks for the response. It was helpful

Answered on 06/16/2015 by John Lewis

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Yes I think so, but you need some kind of bulkhead to constrain and shape the foam. Also you should have a fairly large hole in it to pour the foam mix in to, and to let the excess to expand out of. This can be trimmed off and covered with a cover plate later. Good luck BRP

Answered on 06/16/2015 by BRUCE PERRY

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I used the foam in the bow storage compartment of a 12' fiberglass fishing boat for added floatation. It worked great and highly recommend it. It expands extensively, so be careful about overfilling as it might damage the boat if it over-expands. Highly recommend it.

Answered on 06/16/2015 by MARK TAYLOR
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Question

Can it be submerged in salt water for indefinite period?

Asked on 05/14/2012 by carlos oliveira

Top Answer

Carlos, The foam will eventually absorb water and should be used in a sealed compartment. It is a great product when used correctly. It expands best when the air temp is above 80 degrees.

Answered on 05/16/2012 by ROBERT HOLMSTROM
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I took it out of my row boat because it weighed too much. I. Build air tight compartments.

Answered on 05/14/2012 by JAMES PHELPS

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Hey Carlos, I built a small, classic duck hunting boat called a barnagat bay seek box. It is never used in saltwater, however I have filled the boat with water and Gear, only to find that I could not sink the boat... The foam works great in fresh water

Answered on 05/15/2012 by JIM COOK

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Carlos, this foam was used as per recommendation..filling voids between the stringer and the hull, below decks. But, I would not hesitate full immersion in salt/fresh water full time. And, it expands very well. But, you have to have the area to be filled, ready! Large hole into which to pour the product after mixture as per instructions. And, an exit hole so product will push the air which is in the area to be filled, out of the exit hole. And, very careful about the temps of the boat void and ambient temp. during mixing and pouring of product. Too cold and product will not expand properly. Too hot and product will not expand properly. Hope this helps you. Jim

Answered on 05/15/2012 by JAMES BALDWIN
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