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Caulking Cotton
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Caulking Cotton
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Caulking Cotton Customer Questions and Answers

4 of 4 Questions

Question

why do you recommend marine paint before seam compound? If I apply a primer before seam compound would I apply another coat of primer after the seam compound and before the final bottom paint?

Asked on 01/13/2017 by Fred Schneider

Top Answer

thank you for taking the time to answer. this is very helpful info.

Answered on 01/14/2017 by Fred Schneider
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Answer

I'm assuming you are talking about a wood boat because of the cotton Caulking topic. Your question is specifically about paint and primer. On my boat, (I'm a strict traditionalist though not a professional) I reef the old cotton out of the seam, then sand out any old sealer within the seam. It's surprising how much comes out. Once the seam edges are clean and down to bare wood, I wipe them down real good and seal them with shellac. Some guys use thinned primer. Below the waterline, I use red lead for this. A marine paint might work, but it should be flat, not glossy. Flat marine topcoat is fundamentally the same as a good oil-based primer. The whole idea is to seal the plank edges before tapping in the cotton. Once the cotton is in, I then coat that with a primer as well. This helps give the seam compound something good to stick to without sinking into the cotton. If that compound were to harden up mixed with the cotton it could keep the two planks from squeezing up tightly when they swell, instead of creating a watertight seam it would, instead, cause a leak. I then apply the seam compound over that, fair up with a putty knife, let it surface dry, sand flush and and prime that as well before the topcoat. I use oil primer or flat marine paint above the waterline and red lead below. Red lead may be hard to find and is expensive, so other marine primers are probably easier to find, cheaper and maybe sufficient. hope this helps.

Answered on 01/14/2017 by JAMES GRENIER

Answer

I recently replanked part of the bottom of my Grandbanks. After completion, I decided to strip out all the seams. I primed all the cracks before I stuffed cotton and caulked. I did this after talking to many people who work on wood boats. This will help to preserve the mahogany planks. I also primed the bottom after I scraped the bottom

Answered on 01/13/2017 by Undisclosed

Answer

I'm sorry but do not know the answer to your question.

Answered on 01/17/2017 by William Teague

Answer

Seam compound adheres better to a painted surface than to bare wood. Priming the seams only with a small brush prior to applying seam compound provides 2 benefits: the paint will help to set the cotton, and provide a good base for the compound.

Answered on 01/13/2017 by WILLIAM PIERCE

Answer

I recently replanked part of the bottom of my Grandbanks. After completion, I decided to strip out all the seams. I primed all the cracks before I stuffed cotton and caulked. I did this after talking to many people who work on wood boats. This will help to preserve the mahogany planks. I also primed the bottom after I scraped the bottom before applying the bottom paint. I have had the boat in the water over 1-1/2 years and still no leaks! Note... after caulking 95% of the bottom, caulk was not available. I called around and found most builders are using 3M 4200. I finished with that and was amazed how easy and efficient it was to use. I could have saved weeks. You may call me if you have any questions. Mike 607.329.5210

Answered on 01/13/2017 by Undisclosed
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Question

what is the largest seam caulking cotton would be for?? THX Larry Plan on caulking a wooden deck to keep no seeums out in Bahamas used okum years ago on old sloops used for clamming decking space is approximtly 3/4 inch

Asked on 05/13/2012 by Larry Seegott

Top Answer

Larry, I assume you are talking about a house? Cotton can be twisted together to form any thickness you like. I guess the deck is treated wood and hopefully well seasoned as they stuff keeps striking for awhile. Make your strands thicker than you might think you need to assure a tight fit. Capt. Mike Wright

Answered on 05/14/2012 by MICHAEL WRIGHT
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Answer

good for weatherstripping storm windows

Answered on 10/15/2012 by George Vandenburgh

Answer

Caulking cotton would not work for a 3/4" seam. It is for tight seams with beveled edges. Try some 1" cotton rope. Drive it flush into the seam with a hammer and a wedge of wood for a caulking tool.

Answered on 06/11/2012 by CHARLES JONES

Answer

Larry, What I learned from my recent experience is the small multi-strand wicking should be used for small seams. Cotton for medium sized seams, and Oakum for the larger seams (on rather thick bottom boards.) With the wicking, and cotton, you can twist multi-strands together to better fit the larger seam gaps. Be careful not to over chalk with any of these products. As the wood swells, it can place unwanted stress on the boards and fasteners. Once seated, and seam cement in place, it is amazing how much the boards will take-up and seal the seam. If the boat has been out of the water for a while, your seams will be very wide and open. Also don't panic when you put her back into water, it can take a few weeks to take-up depending upon the amount of time the boat has been out of the water. You may need to keep her in the sling or on the trailer in the water until things get tighter. Best of luck! Rob

Answered on 05/14/2012 by ROBERT BATTLE
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Question

I need to put some caulking between boards in an old wood floor that needs painting. Can caulking cotton and oakum be painted?

Asked on 09/24/2019 by LauraMcMahon from Falmouth MA

Top Answer

Yes

Answered on 10/08/2019 by Richard
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Question

Is 1/4 inch small, medium or large gap to fill with cotton

Asked on 05/07/2017 by Skot from Guilford Ct. USA

Top Answer

1/4" is a fairly large gap to fill with cotton. Any larger you may want to use oakum.

Answered on 05/10/2017 by JD Tech Team
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