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Oakum marine caulking
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4.5
Based on 15 Reviews
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Oakum Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 20 Questions

Question

can you use oakum to repair water leaks on lead joint pipes?

Asked on 05/06/2014 by Moe Trujillo

Top Answer

what size and type of pipe is it? i have had good luck using oakum with urethane gel that reacts when water comes in contact with it, on sewer pipes and storm drain pipes.

Answered on 05/07/2014 by JEFF DANIELS
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Is it safe to assume you are talking about a soil iron waste pipe? If so, if the leak is through the packing at the hub, you may be able to repack it, using oakum and more lead. If it is more in the nature of a crack in the pipe, then oakum won't work - the best long-term fix will be to replace the section.

Answered on 05/07/2014 by E S

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We used ours as packing in a sealed bearing enclosure. But I am told way back when it was used in drain piping to seal tile joints. Don't know about the lead pipe.

Answered on 05/07/2014 by JEFF HOCHSCHILD

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OK, just pack the oakum in first good and tight then ram the lead behind it...it should stop the leak dead inits tracks its trac

Answered on 05/07/2014 by DEREK ROBINSON

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YES! Pack it in tight. But, who uses lead joints anymore these days? Much easier to use pvc drain lines.

Answered on 05/07/2014 by DEREK ROBINSON

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you may want to try tearing the oakum into thin strands and soaking in some urethane grout (3M or Avanti) and use a hammer and screwdriver and wedge into joints and urethane grout will react with the water and create a nice seal.

Answered on 05/08/2014 by JEFF DANIELS

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it's a 12" water main cast iron pipe. installed maybe 50 yrs plus ago. sometimes they leak and we just use lead type fiber and caulk it.

Answered on 05/07/2014 by Moe Trujillo

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we have old water main lines throughout the city that are lead joints. sometimes they spring a leak and we use soft lead fiber to caulk in the bell area and it stops the leak.

Answered on 05/07/2014 by Moe Trujillo
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Question

I am thinking of using oakum to seal the joint between a 3' high poured concrete flood wall and the irregular veneered wall on my house. Would it be appropriate for that?

Asked on 02/11/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I successfully used the oakum on a concrete control joint. I used a 'NP-1' caulk product first, inserted the oacum like a backer rod, and did a finish caulk joint on top of the oakum. When the oakup gets wet it swells up and seals better than backer rod foam. The oacum can be seperated to use the size you need. I did cut some off when I first got it and put it in water...and it does swell up a lot. It did take me a while to find this at Jamestown on the net. Glad I did! If it ever does leak, I know it will be swelling up in the joint and it should not get any worse than the initial drips...till the oakum swells up and stops the leak!

Answered on 02/11/2014 by Donnie T Donnie T
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Oakum is not a sealer. I only use it in household or construction applications to repel insects and mice and reduce corrosion.

Answered on 02/11/2014 by GILBERT SMITH

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Likely yes depending on the size of the gap and the irregularity of the veneer. Otaku works by swelling to several times it's original size when exposed to water so it must be of sufficient size to snugly fill the joint . I am a contractor and I commonly use oakum to seal below grade pipe penetrations through concrete walls.

Answered on 02/12/2014 by RON MARRA

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I can't answer that question for you. I only ordered this item per request of one of my foremen. I do know we are using it to seal leaks in 72" concrete pipe. How that applies to your needs I don't know. Sorry!

Answered on 02/11/2014 by JILL GOODE

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You could use it for that but I would combine it with a sealant you could caulk over with after. oakum is good for taking up space and it will seal somewhat but I always put something over it for seal tight applications.

Answered on 02/11/2014 by MIKE GLUSZEWSKI

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My only concern would be for movement. You said that this was a concrete joint. Joints are put in concrete for a reason and you would not want to interfere with that. I you feel movement is not an issue then go for it. There are silicon based materials you can try that would allow for movement while maintaining the seal. Good luck

Answered on 02/12/2014 by SEAN HOWARD
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Question

What is the thickness (diameter) of the oakum strand. I am bidding a project that requires 4" of oakum to be inserted around a 1.5" pipe, all inside of a 3" casing riser. I'm not sure how much oakum this would require?

Asked on 01/23/2013 by David R

Top Answer

Hi David 1 pack should be enough oakum for your job. However, I'm not sure it is the right material for pipe packing in large quantity... although once used for pipe threads etc. I suggest a more modern approach to sealing or filling the space.

Answered on 01/24/2013 by a griffiths
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It's about 1" in diameter. I hope this helps.

Answered on 03/01/2013 by RYAN HALL

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The oakum varies from about 3/4" to 1" in diameter.

Answered on 03/25/2013 by TOM HESMOND

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It's a rope, maybe 1/2" or 5/8" I'm guessing. I used it to pack a cast iron joint before leading it. Worked fine. But my joint was only about 1/4" or 3/8".

Answered on 01/24/2013 by JOHN PFLUKE
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Question

I have a strip plank mohagoney cabin. the boat is over 40 years old and expansion and cotraction has taken a toll. the seams aren't that wide. can I us oakum to fix this and if so, is their a specific type or kind?

Asked on 05/23/2013 by Sean Bourne

Top Answer

the planks are 3/4 inch wide and the seams are about 1/8 or less. what about caulking cotton or caulk wicking?

Answered on 05/24/2013 by Sean Bourne
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If the planks are less than 3/4" thick and seems less than 1/8" wide and area is not regularly wet, then I would not recommend oakum, Even in oakum seems which are generally larger than above specs, there is usually a putty laid to pay the seems, In an above waterline situation with small cracks products like sikaflex would be advisable. If only hairline and very, few epoxy may work well., especially if a painted surface, if varnished or oiled I recommend black sikaflex or similar product.

Answered on 05/23/2013 by a griffiths

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I believe this product would work well in that application I don't remember exactly what product or was but Jamestown people should ne able to answer that. We used the product I purchased to stop a leaking sheet wall that We were working behind, and we were 15 ft below water level and it held back that much pressure.

Answered on 05/23/2013 by DUSTIN HOWELL
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Question

do i have to remove olf oakum before applying new ?

Asked on 08/01/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It depends on what you are trying to accomplish, and the limits of your goals. I personally only remove all of the existing material if I am trying to replace a bad plank, while saving the adjacent planks.If I am repairing seams during a haul out/bottom job, I only remove the LOOSE material,which is mostly seam compound.I lightly pound in new oakum if the seams are opened up so deep that the new seam compound would be the only sealant without it. Hope this helps!

Answered on 09/25/2012 by TYSON HANSLIK
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yes

Answered on 08/30/2012 by ROGER BRUETT

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All of the reading I have done says that it is very important to pull out all of the old material, apply paint or red lead, and then start with cotton, then Oakum, then seam sealer.

Answered on 08/01/2012 by JOE BERINI
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Question

How wide of a gap between boat planks do I need to have before cotton caulk is ineffective and oakum should be used?

Asked on 04/20/2012 by Steve Dami

Top Answer

it will depend on thickness of planks and plank material as each swell differently,are plaanks riveted or screwed?oakum can swell more than cottont and can burst seams.the type of seam compound is critical as well.is the rest of boat cotton or oakum?what are condition of planks?has the boat been in water or out for a long time?i would advise asking a local shipwright to view before proceeding. i am a shipwright best regards david

Answered on 05/10/2012 by DAVID MCCORMICK
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I need the answer to that myself. Go to YouTube and search Oakum or caulking wooden boats. There are some great videos there. Jim B

Answered on 04/20/2012 by JIM BRIDGES

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Thanks David. The planking is 7/8" thick. The topsides are Cypress and the bottom is mahogany. The topsides are screws with #10 silicon bronze - apparently original fastenings, and in excellent shape. When the bottom was replaced with Mahogany, they screws it with #12 silicon bronze. She has been on the hard for about a year to undergo frame repairs (steam bent white oak). Unfortunately I do not have access to a shipwright that is local enough to come by. Most seams are tight, but when the bottom was replaced years ago they used some sort of rubbery sealant an put no cotton or compound anywhere. The topsdies are uncaulked as well. I suspect this cause alot of working in the planks and fractured the ribs, as none are rotted. You can see it here: just go to photo bucket dot com and enter: /albums/cc428/stangusso/1935%20Richardson%20seams/

Answered on 05/10/2012 by Steve Dami
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Question

Can bentonite oakum be used to seal inside the sleeve that goes through a poured foundation wall? A pipe is in the middle of one polyvinyle chloride sleeve, and an electrical cable is in the middle of another polyvinyle chloride sleeve. Apparently the water plug that is on the outside of the house and is several feet under ground has started to leak.

Asked on 12/01/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I don't see why not. Keep in mind that oakum can swell quite a bit, so don,t pack it too tightly. If you still have a leak,try putting some polyurethane glue (gorilla glue) on the oakum first and then tucking the oakum into the gap all the way around.

Answered on 01/19/2012 by FRANK HINTON
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I'm sorry I cannot answer your question. My only use for oakum is to patch drafty cracks between the boards of an old cabin.

Answered on 12/30/2011 by GEORGE HEWITT

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We were using this product on a steel sheet wall application. We were working 19ft below the top of the river and water kept leaking thru the sheeting seams. We would push the oakum into leaking areas and within minutes the water would stop running into the work area. So our overall opinion of oakum is it is a very good product for the right applications and i dont see why it wouldnt work in yours.

Answered on 12/01/2011 by DUSTIN HOWELL
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Question

Hello, does the 50 lb comes in long lenght or it is 2 1/2 feet as the 5lb package?

Asked on 06/11/2016 by matt cuzm

Top Answer

What o bought came in one long rope and you cut off what you need Donnie T.

Answered on 06/11/2016 by Donnie T Donnie T
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The package is 2.5 feet but the Oakum is like a skeen of wool and thus longer than the package. Be careful in storage. If you store it upright the oils will gravitate down and can make a mess. Oakum is easier to work with than cotton. Cheers!

Answered on 06/11/2016 by PATRICK MCCARTHY-JAWBONE
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Are there two kinds of Oakum? Yours seems to be made with bentonite, but I believe the old type is made with pine tar.

Asked on 07/01/2015 by Mary Julia Kephart

Top Answer

The product I received from Jamestown was definitely permeated with tar/oil- it didn't smell of pine, but also didn't smell of petroleum, so I don't what it was specifically. The bentonite is added to increase the expansion when in contact with water.

Answered on 08/28/2015 by E S
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This is the only Oakum we carry.

Answered on 07/02/2015 by Rick White
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Question

How thick is the oakum?

Asked on 04/25/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It's about an inch in diameter but it's very fibrous. It easily pulls apart to any diameter you need to stuff it into. Think string cheese. I hope this helps.

Answered on 04/25/2014 by ROBERT WOODS
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It is roughly a 1/2" thick

Answered on 04/25/2014 by ROBIN RUSCH
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