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Interlux Perfection Plus Two Part Varnish
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Interlux Perfection Plus 2 Part Varnish
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Interlux Perfection Plus Two Part Varnish Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 28 Questions

Question

After application, does Perfection Plus require a cure time before it can get wet? High humidity is preventing me from varnishing my kayak until Thursday. We leave for Lake Huron Saturday. Is this going to be a problem?

Asked on 06/24/2014 by Terry Bakewell

Top Answer

THanks, Bill.

Answered on 06/24/2014 by Terry Bakewell
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It does require some cure time which varies depending n temp/humidity. If it were me, I would put some sort of supplemental heat in the work environment to cut down on the humidity and elevate the temp. The finish will be a bit softer than what it would be in it's fully cured state but two days post application you should be fine in the water particularly if you jack up the heat some.

Answered on 06/24/2014 by RANDY BOGARDUS

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Actually, one coat dries pretty fast. However, the varnish is sensitive to moister before 24 hrs. Had to redo a coat which got fogged by dew. It caused a weird matte finisfh. Normally this stuff is ultra glossy almost like glass. A great finish but requires care in application.

Answered on 06/25/2014 by Weaver Lilley

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This is a catalyzied finish, not one that relies on evaporation of voc's. As long as the temp is up, it should cure (as opposed to "dry") as per interlux structions. Follow directions...no worries.

Answered on 06/24/2014 by BILL MCGRAW

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Cure time is fairly quick, depending on temp. and humidity. I'd say 24 hrs minimum, but I've seen it cure in as little as 8-12 hrs. Concerning temp and humidity...I've found out after using it the last 3 years that it is much is easier to apply at a slightly lower temp (55-60 degrees), as opposed to 70+. Lower temp allows you to go back and smooth over any imperfections. It tends to go on thick anyhow, and therefore sags much more than traditional varnish. We sometimes will use a thinner for the first and second coats. Make sure the surface is bone dry before you apply, otherwise you'll have to deal with moisture under the coat, which leads to 'whiting' bubbles and the need to start from scratch.

Answered on 06/24/2014 by NEAL HARRELL

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THanks, Neal. I moved the kayak from the garage to my shop which is about 65 right now. I'm gonna go for it and hope for the best.

Answered on 06/24/2014 by Terry Bakewell

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Thanks, guys. First coat is on.

Answered on 06/24/2014 by Terry Bakewell

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Humidity is a real downer. The cure time is very slow. On the western side of my boat the sun managed to help it cure brightly, but the eastern shady side turned milky. I ended up doing 8 coats, but still had the milkyness show. Everything else I did that could be removed and varnished I let dry inside the boat and came out beautiful

Answered on 06/24/2014 by PAUL FLYR
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Question

I am restoring a 1955 Mercedes with hardwood trim interior. All the trim is out of the car, has been epoxied and is ready for finish. I'm looking for a piano finish and don't want to spray. This looks like the right product but I'm concerned about odor. I'm worried about what it would be like inside the car on a warm day? Any comments??

Asked on 11/20/2014 by Boots Evans

Top Answer

I am sorry that i won't be much help to you. I only used this on my tiller, i never noticed any odor but I can't say with certainty what will occur when it gets warmed and enclosed inside of the car.

Answered on 11/22/2014 by SCOTT BLAIS
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Answer

I used it for an every-day dining table but for about anything else inside I'd suggest a thick brushing marine 1-part varnish with UV protection. BE CAREFUL TO GET THE RIGHT THINNER FOR PERFECTION VARNISH - NOT JUST ANY INTERLUX. After full curing, Perfection will sand and rub to a gloss.

Answered on 11/21/2014 by GARY TAYLOR

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Haven't noticed any residual odors from my varnish of a kayak deck, even though we keep the boat inside at times. However, during application there are copious amounts of fumes. Make sure you have sufficient ventilation. I prefer working outside if possible. The final finish, after 3 coats, is spectacular.

Answered on 11/20/2014 by Weaver Lilley

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After a month it won't smell

Answered on 11/20/2014 by MIKE PALUMBO

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I used Perfection varnish on a boat that I keep in a hot garage and have never noticed any smell at all after the initial drying time.

Answered on 11/20/2014 by PHIL RYDER

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I used this product on a boat transom. The finished transom sat for a month or so in my shop while I finished other aspects of the boat project. I did not smell any lingering smell from the finish. Paul M

Answered on 11/25/2014 by PAUL MARSHALL

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no odor after full cure. great product!

Answered on 11/20/2014 by RANDY BOGARDUS
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Question

I have refinished a 1963 Boston Whaler Sakonnet center console, which is mahagony ply. I used 3 coats of Smiths penetrating epoxy sealer, followed by a coat of 207/105 hardener and epoxy. I am told I will need a varnish over the top of this to protect from UV damage. Is this the right product for my needs? If so how do I prep the surface for the varnish? I am hearing I need to wash it very well and then sand? Is there a cleaner I need to use for this?

Asked on 04/16/2014 by Adrian Guyer

Top Answer

I'm not aware of any cleaner, but you definitely will need to prep the wood by sanding. I believe you need to use s

Answered on 04/16/2014 by ROBERT SANDERS
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If you just epoxied it I don't see the need to wash it. Just sand it very smooth and use a tack cloth before applying the perfection varnish. I roll it on and then tip it off with a foam brush. I recommend varnishing indoors if possible. If not, stay out of direct sunlight and conditions for drying must be very good. IE, no condensation (which ruined my final coat forcing me to sand and apply another). The finish is spectacular and worth the extra expense and work. Expect at least 3 coats, sanding in between. Very durable finish is the result.

Answered on 04/17/2014 by Weaver Lilley

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Robert, I have already applied 3 coats of penetrating epoxy as well as a coat of west system 207 hardener. So not applying to wood..

Answered on 04/16/2014 by Adrian Guyer

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there is a cleaner that the maker recommends marked on the back of the can of perfection. However I have used this product on several projects and have found that just a good wash and rinse with a cleaner like tide laundry detergent does the best job for me. My question to you is why only one coat of west system? I would recommend based on my experience that you apply at least 3 to 5 total coats of epoxy then allow to cure, sand,(use your judgement sanding the epoxy as to how smooth a finish you want to achieve) wash and rinse very well, then put at least 3 to 5 coats of the 2 part perfection plus, sanding between each coat. This will achieve a great "hard shell" over your wood as well as great uv protection. GREAT PRODUCT!

Answered on 04/18/2014 by MICHAEL DARNELL

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Adrian, You could go either way, either a good varnish like Ephphanes or Interlux Captain's, or use perfection plus. If the grain is totally filled during that last West system application, I would wash it with soap and water...the amine blush is water soluble. The block sand the 207 surface with 220 grit, then apply your varnish. It's true that varnish is relatively short lived, but service life varies tremendously depending on latitude.It the console has a cover or you're up north, you can get a season or two if you touch up nicks, worn spots, or deep scratches. That keeps moisture penetration at bay. I guess my preference is to use Perfection Plus in the shop on top of epoxy base, but to use varnish thereafter at the dock and on the hard because it is easier to maintain. I't hard to mix a tiny quantity of PPlus for touch up and to have all the stuff you need to do the job on board all the time.Two tips: 1) PPlus mixing: go get some irrigation syringes from a home health care supply store and use separate syringes for A and B so they're reusable and you get a perfect mix. and 2) if you choose varnish, go to an auto paint supply store(who supply body shops) and pick up a handfull of small bottles with brush lids. Put some varnish in that and keep it in your console for touch up. they are like nail polish bottles...well, sort of. Good luck, Adrian, You project sound like good fun.

Answered on 04/17/2014 by BILL MCGRAW

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I'm happy to answer that question: I use perfection plus as a top coat over all kinds of epoxy/fiberglass layups. Perfection plus bonds very well to cured epoxy, and provides good UV protection. I've been using it for 6 years with no hint of UV degradation. I scuff sand the epoxy surface with a 120 grit wet sanding prior to applying the Perfection Plus. If you want to re-coat Perfection Plus after it has fully cured, you must sand away all traces of its glossy surface, or the new coat will not adhere in the areas that were not well sanded.

Answered on 04/16/2014 by DANA FENIMORE

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Yes, you will need UV protection and you will definitely need to prep the wood by sanding with the recommended grit of sandpaper. (100-20?). If you use too fine of sandpaper the interlude will not adhere to the 207/105 epoxy. I made this mistake on my wooden kayaks. The interlux may look milky when you first mix it. That's ok, it will dry clear and will look great on your boat.

Answered on 04/16/2014 by ROBERT SANDERS
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Question

When cleaning my expensive badger hair brushes after applying Perfection Plus 2 part varnish, do I use 2333N solvent? If not, what/how do you clean a 2 part varnish?

Asked on 05/30/2018 by Rick from Alton, NH

Top Answer

2333N is the solvent for the task, but you may want to find a nice compromise brush that balances natural bristle and cost for enough flow, as this brush will not last nearly as long with these solvents.

Answered on 06/18/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Answer

Last Spring I refinished my entire cabin sole in my garage. I used three cans of Perfection Plus 2 part and found that brush cleaning with 2333N worked well. I do have to add that the first can went fairly well. The second two did not. I found the product to be terribly sensitive to temperature and humidity which produced either poor finish or excessively long curing times. I finished the project with a can of single part and wished I had started with that. Another problem-the pouring spout on the hardener can is poorly designed in that it does not allow you to use the entire product without opening the can with the conventional method. By the way-The finished sole, from both products is tremendously durable. Hope this helps!

Answered on 05/30/2018 by jdemarsh

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I would recommend NOT using your expensive babger hair brush with perfection plus. This product flows out very well and will not need a fancy brush. Use a decent brush you don't mind throwing away after you use it. Do not use cheap chip brushes that leave brush hairs in your work. 

Answered on 05/30/2018 by pac4seas

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Lacquer thinner works quite well.

Answered on 05/31/2018 by falconfrst

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Yes, that is the solvent to use to clean Perfection Plus off brushes, but it takes so many rinse cycles and the solvent is so expensive, I don't recommend it. I also find that a "cleaned" badger brush still had debris that will be visible in the finish. Instead, I use a very cheap ($1) disposable brush for the under coats that will be sanded and I just throw the brush away, rather than try to clean it. Then I use a nice brush for the final coat. I prefer a brand new nylon bristle brush, over a used badger brush. Another trick is to freeze your brush if you are going to use it again the next day. The freezing will slow the hardening reaction in the finish and will let to resume the next day as if no time elapsed. I also have frozen excess finish that has been mixed and used it withing 2-3 days with no adverse effect. I typically do this for under coats, not finish coats.

Answered on 06/04/2018 by scott.david.hill

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I use 2333N as a reducer/thinner and use throwaway brushes but expect 2333N should clean your brush just fine, albeit somewhat expensive!

Answered on 06/10/2018 by jeda
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Question

Can you use flattening agent in perfection plus 2 part varnish?

Asked on 07/15/2015 by carl bradley

Top Answer

Yes. Interlux flattening agent for two part polyurethane.

Answered on 07/16/2015 by David Berman
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Hi again Carl, Oops, I meant YZM914 flattening agent. Craig

Answered on 07/15/2015 by CRAIG BRYANT

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I don't have a clue. I have not used the product yet. I bought it because my favorite 2-part poly varnish (Steve Smith & Co. of Richmond CA) is no longer made. It seems to use the same suite of thinner, etc. (wear a solvent mask!!!) as their one part polyurethane so if there is a flatener in that Interlux suite it might be compatible as well. Good luck! Lou Linden

Answered on 07/15/2015 by LOUIS LINDEN

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Hi, I do not use Perfection Plus Two Part varnish and Return this to Jamestown distributer. thanks. Zinoviy.

Answered on 07/15/2015 by ZINOVIY KATAYENKO

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Hi Carl, I looked at the data sheet for YZM214, Flattening Agent for two part Polyurethanes, and it says it is for use with Perfection and Perfection Plus. I have not used the flattening agent before.

Answered on 07/15/2015 by CRAIG BRYANT
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Question

Do I need to sand between coats if surface is a little rough and I am not concerned about a perfectly smooth finish?

Asked on 07/14/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes, you need to sand between coats with the recommend grit sandpaper or it will not adhere and large sections will run and create a huge mess. I used a higher grit sandpaper than recommend (I think I used 320) between coats and it was not able to adhere and I had a bunch of runs..... Here's how I use it. Do a light sand before your first coat. I have applied a second coat about 4 hours later while it was still tacky, but do not to apply more than 1 coat or it will run and make a huge mess. Wait 24 hours, then lightly sand and apply the next coat. Repeat for every coat you apply. Hope this helps Rob

Answered on 07/14/2015 by ROBERT SANDERS
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This stuff will give you a mirror like finish, as hard as glass and extremely durable. If you put it on a rough finish, it will accentuate the rough appearance because of its high gloss. I would suggest something else, a urethane semi gloss or matte. However, if you sand, prime and then sand between coats (you don't have to kill yourself on the between coat sandings) you'll get an incredible finish. Yes it's a lot of work but worth it.

Answered on 07/14/2015 by Weaver Lilley

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technically you can recoat without sanding if you do so within the specified amount of time (it is temperature dependent). That said it is really easy to lightly sand and you will get a much better finish if you do so. There is a tendency for the finish to develop small air bubbles in the surface if the conditions are not just right (temperature, brush technique, amount of thinner and humidity all seem to be at play). Sanding these out is easy, the lightly cured varnish sands with little effort. Sanding improves the gloss, depth and quality of the final finish. You do have to wait for the finish to cure enough before you sand, a quick light pass of the sandpaper will tell you if it is cured sufficiently. Honestly, it is not the sanding that is the hard part it is the waiting involved in laying down 5-7 coats.

Answered on 07/14/2015 by BRENT FARLER

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Yes. But only with some fine sandpaper, like 4-600 grit, and only to scuff the surface.

Answered on 07/14/2015 by Shawn Jones

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That would probably depend on how soon you re-coat. The company's technical literature usually has recommendations regarding this, which also take into account factors such as the temperature. But, if you are in those parameters, I'm pretty sure you can re-coat without sanding.

Answered on 07/14/2015 by JERRY STEENSON
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Question

Need to finish new slid teak and maple cabin sole. Is this the product to do it or do you recommend a different product?

Asked on 02/26/2014 by Mike Mojzak

Top Answer

This product produces an amazing finish. On anything you would like to varnish, this is an amazing substitute fort he traditional marine product. It gives you a surface that is astonishing glossy and durable. The downside is the price and the difficulties of application. Since it is 2 part, you have a limited window of time to lay down your coat (of which you will need a minimum of 3). On the positive side, after you screw up the first coat, you have 2 more (with sanding) chances to get it right. In the end, all said and done, you've got a jaw dropping finish.

Answered on 02/27/2014 by Weaver Lilley
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I use this product on custom wood paddleboards I sell. It is a great product and I would highly recommend it for hard use areas. One word of caution, however; use only the best organic vapor respirator you can get your hands on. The fumes from this stuff are not to be triffled with!

Answered on 02/26/2014 by RANDY BOGARDUS

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As a first time user of any kind of varnish, I was worried about screwing it up. A hondurous mahogany transom is a place that errors will show up and I wanted it to be perfect. Perfection Plus went on like a dream and performed perfectly for me. It has only been 6 months, so I can't report on UV protection, but none of my fears were well founded. Be sure to follow the mixing ratio closely (really simple with a set of measuring cups from the kitchen) and a good brush. Interlux tech support was also very helpful in answering my endless questions.

Answered on 02/28/2014 by PAUL MARSHALL

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This product is like an epoxy and is very hard, but it scratches easier than varnish and might leave a white mark. I used it to finish an expensive wooden kayak and was pleased. Hope that helps.

Answered on 02/26/2014 by ROBERT SANDERS

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I don't know how this stuff will work on teak. I've only used it on walnut, and it seems pretty much bomb-proof there. However, if Interlux says specifically that it works on teak, and gives detailed prep instructions that you can actually implement, I would be inclined to take them on their word.

Answered on 02/26/2014 by JERRY STEENSON
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Question

Can I use another varnish with a satin finish over this product?

Asked on 06/04/2018 by Dave from Annapolis, MD

Top Answer

There should be no compatibility issues with using another varnish over fully cured Perfection Plus, but they also have the flattening agent that you can mix with this product (it is called Flattening Agent for 2-Part Polyurethanes). This will retain all of the other physical properties that are desirable in using 2-component urethane systems.

Answered on 06/19/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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My understanding is you can apply other finishes to Perfection but you can not put Perfection on top of anything else. This stuff is as hard as nails and extremely bright when cured.If you overcoat it be sure and sand the surface to create some bite for your overcoat.

Answered on 06/04/2018 by deloachhc

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I have no idea!

Answered on 06/04/2018 by morr1

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yes you can, however if you are looking for a satin finish on the final coat think about using the Interlux's two part flattening agent to reduce the sheen.

Answered on 06/05/2018 by pl3logistics
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Question

Hi. I used Interlux Perfection Plus 2 Part Varnish as the finish coat over epoxy (West System)on outdoor furniture. Followed all of the instructions for prep. When the final coat cured,it was beautifully clear and glossy, but wherever I touched it left a filmy smear. So I wiped it down with a damp microfiber cloth and the entire surface is now filmy. Temps in the 80's and humidity in the 40-50% range. Any idea on why this happened or suggested solution? Thanks.

Asked on 07/05/2016 by Stuart Woolley

Top Answer

Thanks Jeff. I will reach out to the folks at Interlux.

Answered on 07/06/2016 by Stuart Woolley
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Hi Stuart Clearly the epoxy had sufficient time to cure. If I were doing the finish I would approach it by doing a full strength coat. You are saying that the film is visible only. This is not something that can be wiped off. I find that the companies that make the product generally have great help on their tech lines. A call to them could save you much worry. I hope that this helps. I really like the Perfection Plus, except for trying to clean the brushes. Which I don't ever try to do any more.

Answered on 07/06/2016 by JEFF CARTER

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We have used this material with success. We have found the key to a good finish is to ensure that the material under it has fully cured. In the case of the epoxy I would expect the cure time to be days after the final application. Did you apply a thinned coat as your first coat and then follow the deco at times?

Answered on 07/05/2016 by JEFF CARTER

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Jeff, thanks for the feedback. The epoxy cured for about 7 days. It was then sanded with 220 and wiped down with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202. I only applied one coat of Perfection Plus as the substrate was now very smooth and fair, so did not thin. The film is definitely only on the surface and is visible from some angles only. I am thinking maybe a thinned coat after another sanding may do the trick. Thoughts?

Answered on 07/06/2016 by Stuart Woolley
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Question

what thinner is used for this?

Asked on 03/02/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

You should get in the habit of reading the extensive information JD provides with every product's listing. It appears under the heading APPLICATION AND USE, and is set off with grey-blue shading. I pasted in the relevant content for Pe3rfection Plus. See below.... Preparation BARE WOOD: Sand with 80 grade (grit) paper. Wipe with Brush Thinner 2333N. Apply a sealer coat of Perfection Varnish reduced 10% with Brush Thinner 2333N. PREVIOUSLY PAINTED SURFACES: With Perfection Varnish: In Good Condition Sand surface with 120-150 grade (grit) paper and remove all dust. In Poor Condition If varnish is badly checked or peeling, remove finish to bare wood with Interstrip Semi-Paste 299E. CLEAR EPOXY: Allow epoxy to cure for 5-7 days. Begin by scrubbing well using soap and water and a stiff brush. Wash down with fresh water. Wet sand with 180-220 grade (grit) paper. Wipe with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202. Method Apply at least 5-7 coats on bare wood and a minimum of 3 coats on surfaces previously coated with Perfection Varnish. Sand between each coat with 220 grade (grit) paper. Remove sanding residue with a rag dampened with Brushing Thinner 2333N. Hints Mixing Mix base and curing agent thoroughly at the specified ratio. Thinner Brush/Roller - Brush Thinner 2333N. Cleaner Epoxy - Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202. Bare Wood - Brush Thinner 2333N.

Answered on 03/02/2015 by MICHAEL CLAUDON
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Not sure, I've never thinned this product. I would contact Interlux.

Answered on 03/03/2015 by Weaver Lilley

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Interlux makes the only thing to use. I think it is known as 2332. It is on the website. Robin

Answered on 03/02/2015 by WILLIAM YOUNG

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A most excellent varnish. Only problem I had was applying it late afternoon in the northwest. The varnish on the shady side absorbed moisture before drying. Several more coats before it finally became acceptably shiny as the first coats still had the moisture fuzzyness. Interior varnished surfaces turned out beautiful.

Answered on 03/03/2015 by PAUL FLYR
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