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Dolfinite Bedding Compound
$58.94Out of Stock
Dolfinite Bedding Compound
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4.8
Based on 12 Reviews
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Dolfinite Bedding Compound Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 17 Questions

Question

I need to restore a carvel planked Columbia tender. The boat was hardly used, then sat in a barn for about 20 years. The planks are in perfect condition, but they have shrunk to expose the oakum and a couple joints that you can see through. I intend to use this boat only occaisionally, thus it will continue to live on a trailer. What product should I use to bed these joints before repainting?

Asked on 02/15/2016 by Emrick Pohling

Top Answer

I agree that Dolfinite will help. I just reframed the transom on my 1951 Lyman using the product. You should lightly caulk the seams you can see through. Do not force it tight. Using a hose and some burlap or old towels and add some moisture to the interior of the hull. Let it drain and dry for about two days and then pay the outside of the hull seams with Dolfinite. After 3or 4 days you can use the hose and put 3or4" of water in the boat to soak it up before using. Repeat the hose treatment a day or so ahead of each time you are to launch. I soak the Lyman before each use!

Answered on 02/16/2016 by JERAULD HOLCOMBE
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Thank you Todd. You answered both of my real questions. I thought the old cotton could stay in, but.... And, I didn't know the difference between the above and below waterline seam compounds, but was pretty sure I didn't need to use both. Also, a great thought about just priming at first. Thanks again!

Answered on 02/15/2016 by Emrick Pohling

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Product instructions say you can use Dolfinite under water so it might work once open seams are caulked. I have used it only as a bedding compound above the waterline and it's super for that, especially on wooden boats.

Answered on 02/15/2016 by DUART SNOW

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Thank you Frank. Perhaps this isn't rocket science after all, and what I need to do is simply GET STARTED.

Answered on 02/15/2016 by Emrick Pohling

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Thanks for the tips Jerauld. I had been wondering about the effectiveness of preswelling from the inside before use as you describe. Sounds like a good plan.

Answered on 02/16/2016 by Emrick Pohling

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I used dolfinite bedding compound with cotton wicking to seal seams on a small wooden boat . After trying different products I found this to be excellent. You may need something heavier than cotton wicking, but I would try dolfinite bedding compound with it. Frank - Long Lake, NY

Answered on 02/15/2016 by FRANK PATINELLI

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Complete is good, thanks again. I did plan to use Interlux compound, but not having used it before, I didn't know how to choose white or brown. I posed the same question on a Wooden Boat forum some time ago and all I got were the textbook answers about white above and brown below. I really don't want to be a pest, but perhaps you'd help me in another area.... The original paint on the boat is of course separated at all the seams. After reefing out the loose cotton, I figured I'd give her a good sanding, but not trying to remove all the remaining original paint. Does this seem reasonable? And is there a particular primer you might suggest. I'll likely finish with Brightside just to keep it in the Interlux family.

Answered on 02/15/2016 by Emrick Pohling

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Emrick, just to be complete in my response. Dolfinite is not the correct product for the seam compound. You want to Interlux White 31 compound.

Answered on 02/15/2016 by TODD VANDERVEN

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Hi, Any loose oakum needs to be reefed out. Seems should be primed and then new cotton or oakum set into the seam. There are two types of seam compound to use. White for above the water line and brown for below. If this boat will stay on a trailer then I would go with the white as it is much easier to work with. I would only prime the boat at first as the seams will take up moisture when first back into the water. Have a good bilge pump handy.After the boat swells the seam compound will bulge out. Use a sharpe edge tool to scrape back to surface and then do your final paint job.

Answered on 02/15/2016 by TODD VANDERVEN

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Whether to remove the original paint or not depends on its condition. If it is tight and the hull is fair then you can scuff sand it and top coat. I am a big fan of Top Secret Coatings. Expensive but superlative product. The SM-1000 worked great on my 42' sloop

Answered on 02/15/2016 by TODD VANDERVEN
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Question

I have a carvel planked wood cruiser. Was wondering if I can use this product between the rudder block and the cedar planks and also between the bottom cedar planks and cedar shingles for water proofing? Thanks

Asked on 06/23/2016 by Pete Llewellyn

Top Answer

All I can say is that I've used it successfully on my Catspaw dingy. It's good stuff.

Answered on 06/24/2016 by Joe DiDomenico
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I'm not sure if I understand how you are using the product but it is generally considered a bedding (between joinery) and is not a "water proofing" product.

Answered on 06/23/2016 by ROBERT BROTEN

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I would not recommend this as a underwater compound. You would be better with brown seam compound or a product like 5200 if you are not concerned about the strong bonding attribute.

Answered on 06/24/2016 by TODD VANDERVEN

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Dolfinite is bedding, not caulking. It is not adhesive, and probably will not stay in place in a seam or other immersion setting. Meant to exclude moisture in relatively tight wood joints, or for sealing hardware mountings. Manufacturer's spec sheet should provide a better answer, and perhaps mfg could also recommend best material for your application.

Answered on 06/23/2016 by PAUL DEORSAY

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I used this product to seal the seam where plywood bottom meets the keel on a small wooden boat; I used it with cotton caulk wicking getting both into seam with a putty knife. Its been water tight for over 2 years. Hope this helps.

Answered on 06/24/2016 by FRANK PATINELLI

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Yes, these are good places to use this bedding product.

Answered on 06/23/2016 by MYNDERSE WOODRUFF

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Yes, the bedding compound can be used above and below the waterline. It is used between metal and wood as well as between woods.

Answered on 06/23/2016 by MICHAEL FELDMAN
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Question

how long to dry ?

Asked on 10/24/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Dolfinite does not dry. This product has been around forever and is still the best bedding compound. It's purpose is for bedding only. The compound stays soft allowing hardware or wood parts to be remove at a later date with out damaging surfaces. Sorry to see Jamestown does not carry the mahogany.

Answered on 10/25/2015 by FRANCIS CASEY
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We use as a bedding compound or a plyable filler when exterior heavy timber checking happens. It isn't really made to dry, just skin over. We will often install, wipe clean excess with a rag lightly soaked in mineral spirits. Wait a day then prime.

Answered on 10/24/2015 by TOM HAINES

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As a more natural bedding compound it isn't going to dry like 3m 4200. That's what makes it nice, you can easily remove bedded items. Best for deck fittings. It will wash out under water if filling gaps. Good stuff.

Answered on 10/25/2015 by ANDREW SIEGFRIED

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The dolfinite product is an original linseed oil based product. It does not actually dry, or 'cure'. It stays pliable in between the double planking or plank to batten as the boat is constructed. In time, two to three weeks I'd estimate, the material that squeezes out of the joints does develop a hard skin.

Answered on 10/25/2015 by PAUL MIKLOS

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Dolfinite is a bedding compound not an adhesive sealant such as BoatLife or Sikaflex. It does not 'set' but remains pliable for years. Be sure to seal bare wood before applying Dolfinite as it will absorb the oils that keep it pliable. Regular glazing compound works pretty well and comes in tubes. Simon Watts San Francisco

Answered on 10/27/2015 by SIMON WATTS

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Really, it never completely dries. It stays a bit flexible to seal bedded fittings. It skins over in two to three days depending on temperature, etc. Then it's easy to clean away the excess you squished out when you snugged the fitting. Great stuff!

Answered on 10/24/2015 by DUART SNOW

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Dolfinite is a traditional material. It is used to fill the space between mating parts such as deck hardware or wood plank joints. This would keep out moisture. Ideally, bedding compound will take years to dry, so when you have to take the joint apart it will separate with a couple of gentel taps.

Answered on 10/24/2015 by MYNDERSE WOODRUFF
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Question

how long is the curing time for 2005n ?

Asked on 09/05/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It is designed not to cure or harden, so it always stays flexible to keep a nice seal.

Answered on 09/05/2014 by ROBERT LAKE
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2 to 3 days at around 70 degrees

Answered on 09/06/2014 by Happy but cautiously optimistic camper..

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It doesn't actually cure but rather gets dry on the outside while the inside stays flexible as it is meant to do. This allows for easier disassembly of parts .It will start to dry in about a week depending on temp/humidity.

Answered on 09/05/2014 by MITCH MULTER

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I found dolfinite to be waterproof immediatey for use on my handrails and toenails. The compound hardens over time and unwanted overspill should be removed immediately.

Answered on 09/08/2014 by CHRISTOPHER P WEIS

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Dolfinite is not an adhesive sealant so has no curing time. It will slowly skin over in the course of a few days but remains pliable enough for the joint to be dismantled years later. Be sure to seal the wood surfaces so the oils remain to maintain this pliability.

Answered on 09/05/2014 by SIMON WATTS

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Sorry no help. Our order had to be canceled due to a shipping problem

Answered on 09/05/2014 by DAVID JOHNSON

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Bedding compound by definition remains flexible and never cures hard. The idea is that you can come back years later to a properly bedded plank or object, give it a gentle tap, and off it comes. It may cure hard around the edges but remain gooey inside. This means that if you bed hardware you will have to clean up the mess with mineral spirits when you remove it for varnishing etc. The good news is that moisture can't collect under the hardware and cause rot.

Answered on 09/05/2014 by MYNDERSE WOODRUFF
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Question

What can I use to thin it? The can says 1481 compound thinner, but I can't find it being sold??

Asked on 08/03/2012 by Paul Harmon

Top Answer

use boiled linseed oil to thin it down. The dolfinite compound is pretty thin to begin with though, make sure you dont thin it down too much

Answered on 08/03/2012 by CONNOR WALLACE
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Sorry, I don't know. Never tried thinning it

Answered on 08/04/2012 by JOHN M WARREN

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Hi Paul, as follow-up to my previous post my comments apply to the natural or mahogany product, I have not had good luck with white. DL

Answered on 08/04/2012 by DOUG LANCASTER

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Hello Paul, I have not tried to thin dolfinite, but I usually use plain paint thinner as means to clean up excess from the work area. As you may have discovered it can be pretty sticky and is difficult to get into small areas. I have found that a small greas gun with a needle tip can help with application in screw holes etc. I then use the paint thinner to clean up the tools at the end of the project. Good luck. Doug Lancaster

Answered on 08/04/2012 by DOUG LANCASTER

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Paul I really never have thinned it before but I recall on an old can years ago that toluene could be used. Personnaly I would try mineral spirits if Toluene("Toluol") is not available. Good Luck Joe Traditional Adirondack Guide Boat builder ,Saranac Lake

Answered on 08/03/2012 by Joe Spadaro

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Raw linseed oil

Answered on 08/04/2012 by ROBERT LAKE

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It is soluble in mineral spirits, so that will thin it when fresh. If it has hardened in the can (as it will tend to do) I don't think there is anything you can do with it.

Answered on 08/03/2012 by JEFF HUFFENBERGER
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Question

PROJECT: Four foot wide corrugated metal drain pipe for a pond. New pipe was placed on top of old pipe due to break in old pipe. Metal band and tar was placed around old and new pipe for support. Now the splice between the two pipes is about four feet under water. There is a leak between the old and new pipes coming around the metal band. Would like to find a product that would hold the leak and be applied under water so would not need to drain the pond. Would this product work?

Asked on 05/13/2013 by Terry Love

Top Answer

My experience with this product is bedding 2 pieces of wood together, but the product is not an adhesive. It takes a few days to set out of the waters and maintains a paste consistency until it is fully cured. When first applied it will form a skin fairly quickly, but to cure all the way through it takes some time. Once the product is cured it is durable and does a good job of sealing the wood joints from water. I don't have enough experience with the project you are working to say for sure, but Dolfinite doesn't seem like what you are looking for. I would keep looking.

Answered on 05/31/2013 by BART HANLINE
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I have not applied Dolphinite underwater. My guess would be that this is not an appropriate application for it.

Answered on 05/31/2013 by FRED ELLIS

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Dolfinite would probably work. I would try bentonite clay if I was trying to fix it. They use that for lining ponds when they are making them. Bentonite clay will swell when it gets wet and is self sealing if it gets pierced. I think you'll need to lower the water level and apply whatever you use to the outside of the pipe. Anything applied to the inside will not stop the leak do to the water pushing it away for the pipe. If it is on the outside of the pipe the water pressure will push it into the pipe. I hope this helps.

Answered on 06/03/2013 by TIM BEACHY

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Hello Bart, Thank you for sending the email about my lake pipe problem. I will continue to look for the correct product. Respectfully, Terry Love

Answered on 06/07/2013 by Terry Love

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No experience with this kind of application, but doubt it would work since it needs time to set. ths

Answered on 06/03/2013 by TOM SOUTHWELL

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I don't think so. Dolfinite is really for bedding/sealing fittings, trim, hardware, etc. on boats above the waterline, not below, and is intended to allow parts to be taken apart later. I would look more at adhesive/sealants like 3M 4200 or 5200 or similar - more tenacious and permanent, and better under water.

Answered on 05/31/2013 by DUART SNOW
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Question

can dolfinite 2005 be used for bedding ports?

Asked on 04/23/2012 by jay klales

Top Answer

I use Dolfinite to bed window frames and teak trim making sure there are no voids. I then run a fine coat of Polyseamseal to protect the Dolfinite. I don't see why it wouldn't work on ports.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by JOE BERINI
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I used the product on a woodie street rod panels. I thought it worked very well if you expect to ever remove the item. The Interlux was more like putty but the Dolfinite was more like runny toothpaste, I this thickened it with west filler 407 I believe. Drys almost hard but removable with a finger nail.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by RODNEY WESTHUIS

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Yes I would use it if installing ports.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by ROBERT GWALTNEY

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Ahoy Jay! Before the advent of the synthetics, there was Dolfinite, "do it right with Dolfinite". The product has been around forever. I was introduced to it in the mid-fifties at $2,25 a Quart! I have used it ever since through my career (Boatbuilding & buccaneering) and on my own ship of my making 45 years ago which I still live aboard. Yer humble servant, Captain Horatio Sinbad Commander armed American Privateer "MEKA II"

Answered on 04/24/2012 by HORATIO CINBAD

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Yes I use it for bedding between planks on a traditional adirondack guideboat. It remains flexabew for many years(between planks). Avoid any bedding compound with anti fungicide additive as it causes copper tacks to turn green andd is very tough to remove. Joe Spadaro Saranac Lake

Answered on 04/23/2012 by Joe Spadaro

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If you think you might need to remove the port at some time, then use Dolfinite. If you never want it to come out again, then use 5200.

Answered on 04/23/2012 by TIM BEACHY
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Question

I am just getting ready to remove various hardware and safety rail stanchions on a 1974 contessa 26. Is this a good product to use for bedding when I put these parts back after (or before)painting?

Asked on 12/13/2014 by George Peele

Top Answer

It is a great bedding compound. I use it for all of my deck bits. I use the Natural version because I am bedding on brightwork. Not sure what options there may be for fiberglass.

Answered on 12/13/2014 by SCOTT ANDREWS
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I'm no expert, but it was great for bedding my spreaders, depending on the color I would do it before painting. Hope it helps.

Answered on 12/13/2014 by MARIA ADE

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A good product, used it to bed hardware after I had the boat painted.

Answered on 12/14/2014 by JOHN SCHMUHL

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It will work fine. Like any bedding compound, initial tightening needs to be re tightened after it has taken its initial set. It is a little messy to work with, butyl tape is another real good product.

Answered on 12/13/2014 by Mack Woods

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You can't do better than Dolfinite. Simon Watts

Answered on 12/13/2014 by SIMON WATTS
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Question

What is the shelf life of this product?

Asked on 07/13/2018 by sweetfancymoses from Hoosier State

Top Answer

Pettit does not state a shelf life on this product. Generally that means you should get a number of years if stored properly, but if you are concerned, you can always contact Pettit and inquire.

Answered on 07/13/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Based on limited experience, I'd say years, maybe decades if you keep the can sealed.

Answered on 07/13/2018 by constan146

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Great question. In fact, I have the same question — I purchased my Dolfinite 2 years ago and still have not opened the can. It would be appreciated if you would share your answer with me.

Answered on 07/14/2018 by twsteele

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Once the can is opened, it sets up within two or three months.  Buy the smallest can for the job.  I do not know the shelf life of an un-opened can. I do love dolphinite,however, and use it for all above-the- waterline bedding jobs.

Answered on 07/14/2018 by paulsites
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Question

Is the mahogany Dolphanite a good match for teak? What color is Dolphanite natural!?

Asked on 04/11/2014 by Jim Van Eimeren

Top Answer

The natural compound is light tan. I don't think it would be a good match for teak after it has aged and gotten grey, but then that may be just me.

Answered on 04/11/2014 by Steve Baker
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"mahogany" is a better match for varnished or oiled teak. I believe the "natural" color is closer to unfinished oak or pine - a light tan.

Answered on 04/11/2014 by PAUL DEORSAY

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Jamestown no longer stocks mahogany Dolphinite...😫

Answered on 08/11/2017 by Canoeboy
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