Free shipping on orders over $99.99! Don't miss out!
$25.76 Limited Stock
Plug Cutters - Hardwood
$25.76Limited Stock
wood plug cutters in stainless steel for hardwoods like oak and teak, fuller wood plug cutters
Ask a Question
5
Based on 5 Reviews
  • 5 Star

    100%

  • 4 Star

    0%

  • 3 Star

    0%

  • 2 Star

    0%

  • 1 Star

    0%

Plug Cutters - Hardwood Customer Questions and Answers

4 of 4 Questions

Question

Do you know where I can find a countersink drill for the one inch plug cutter?

Asked on 06/21/2013 by Roy Walter

Top Answer

For larger plugs I use a spade bit rather than a purpose-made counter bore.

Answered on 06/22/2013 by GEOFFREY LANE
See More Answers (4)

Answer

glad it helped

Answered on 06/21/2013 by DONALD SHEA

Answer

Donald....thanks so much for the info.! I am building a timber gazebo this summer and it will come in handy. Thanks!

Answered on 06/21/2013 by Roy Walter

Answer

I have a whole set, but here is a link to a single cutter < a href="http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=484&familyName=Four+Flute+Type+C+Countersinks+" target="_blank">http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=484&familyName=Four+Flute+Type+C+Countersinks+< /a>

Answered on 06/21/2013 by DONALD SHEA

Answer

I used a 3/8 forstener bit for the countersink for ipe plugs. I would drill about 3/8 " down with the forstener bit and then switch to a 1/8 bit to predrill the rest of the way through the ipe. I used gorilla glue when I plugged the holes. Before deciding on the forstener bit and separate 1/8 bit arrangement, I tried a combo pre-drill-countersinking tool and broke the 1/8 bit on the first try. After seeing how easy it was to use the forstener bit, I never tried the combo again. Hope this helps.

Answered on 06/21/2013 by MITCHELL BERNSTEIN
Answer Question

Question

can you use this cutter in a cnc router?

Asked on 03/10/2016 by mike bordeaux

Top Answer

I don't see why not. Need proper chuck type tool holder to hold it unless you find one with round shank.

Answered on 03/10/2016 by BJORN BAKKEN
See More Answers (2)

Answer

thanks for the info, i was thinking that would be the case. i'll use a spiral bit instead. thanks again

Answered on 03/12/2016 by mike bordeaux

Answer

Plug cutters like slow RPMs and are typically used in a drill press or in a pinch in a hand drill. Routers typically produce high RPMs. Higher RPMs will burn the wood and dull the bit in hardwood. Unsure about shank dimension in router, and therefore safety of the application

Answered on 03/11/2016 by PETER THOMPSON
Answer Question

Question

how does one sharpen a plug cutter ?

Asked on 02/18/2012 by cal christianson

Top Answer

I do mine free handed on the sanding disc of my Work Sharp 3000. Hope this helps

Answered on 02/21/2012 by JACK LEWIS
See More Answers (2)

Answer

I would think with a hand file

Answered on 02/24/2012 by JESS MULVANEY

Answer

I'm not sure if other professional woodworkers will agree with my method, but it works quite well for me and I have sharpened my plug cutters many times this way. First I put the shaft of the cutter in a vise to keep it stable. I then use a 6" fine flat file to file the angles on the ends of the legs, using 2 hands on the file to keep the file stable and the angle the same as the original. I always count the strokes that I take on each leg so that I am fairly sure that I am removing the same amount of material from each leg. Keeping the legs a uniform length is very important for smooth operation of the cutter. If they are different lengths, the cutter will grab when it comes in contact with the wood as you try to cut the plugs. In order to make sure that the legs are the same length, I chuck the cutter in the drill press and with the drill press on, slowly lower the cutter down onto a piece of 320 sandpaper glued to a piece of hardwood plywood. Do not apply enough pressure to cut through. Remove the plug cutter and examine the ends of the legs. You can see which leg was contacting first by the dull spot on the end. Take a couple more strokes on that leg with the file and check it again. This is a long explanation, but I could have sharpened my cutter in less time than it took to write this. It's a fairly easy process and works well for me. If the sides of the cutter legs are worn and dull they are easy to touch up with the same flat file, and you don't have to be as careful keeping them uniform.

Answered on 02/21/2012 by DAVID WOOD
Answer Question

Question

What does the "carded" mean in product FUL-11700375C vs the plain product FUL-11700375?

Asked on 02/03/2021 by Todd from Woonsocket, RI

Top Answer

Carded means it has been packaged for display in a retail store.

Answered on 02/04/2021 by Paul
Answer Question
1 of 1