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Interlux Brightside Polyurethane Topside Paint Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 189 Questions

Question

Can you use something other than the 333 to do the solvent wipedown? Same question for keeping the brush soaked when tipping? IE mineral spirits?

Asked on 09/02/2011 by Chris McCrossan

Top Answer

Based on the material safety data sheet for 333, I've concluded that it is half kerosene and half naptha. I now mix my own and am happy with the results.

Answered on 12/06/2011 by JOEL HORNE
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I used the 333 solvent. It contains kerosene and is slow drying. I trusted Interlux and the system worked well.

Answered on 09/08/2011 by MICHAEL WIDDOP

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SAME ANSWER... why cross contaminate? That is why I said use or try on a scrap job FIRST.. hey if it works.. go for it! But I think you will find the Interlux 333 far superior to any mineral spirits off the shelf. The 333 is a lot more refined an less oily base such as the spirits are... just put a few drops of each on a hard surface an watch what happens... one evaporates an the other sits there with oily residue.. even if you use it as a wipe down, that residue is still there effecting your paint job. Any paint job is as only good as it's prep,,, no matter what your painting.

Answered on 09/07/2011 by CLYDE E CARON

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Thanks for the tips Charles!

Answered on 09/06/2011 by Chris McCrossan

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Thanks Clyde. I was just wondering as I have a bunch of mineral spirits at home. I wasnt thinking of using it to thin the paint. I was only asking for using it for the wipedown before applying.

Answered on 09/06/2011 by Chris McCrossan

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You can always TRY to use "mineral spirits" per say... but WHY? If you paid the big bucks for the good stuff why compromise... READ an USE the directions on the can.. the 333 is a nice thinner and is hot enough to work.. mineral spirits on the other hand if not Interlux brand I would hesitate to even use it. The 333, mixes instantly an flows the surface well and flash's off well and leaves a great finish when done rolling and tipping your work.. if you use anything else I would try it on scrap first to eliminate further WORK! If it says to use the product why would you even question? When you order you can see the descriptions and everything you will need in the info for the product... it's there for a reason... order ALL the items you need at one time an avoid shortcuts! Just my opinion but, if it ain't broke, don't fix it!!

Answered on 09/06/2011 by CLYDE E CARON

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Thanks Alfred

Answered on 09/06/2011 by Chris McCrossan

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Thanks again Sir!!! Will do!

Answered on 09/07/2011 by Chris McCrossan

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You can use whatever you want as a cleaning solvent, I guess. However, the way I look at it, once I send the money on Brightside, why not use what is recommended? As far as tipping, I use a dry brush.

Answered on 09/06/2011 by TOM SWEENEY

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When I did not have 333 available (or run out mid job) I have used regular hardware store variety paint thinner, but made sure it had plenty of time to dry. It worked out fine. I don't soak my tipping brushes. I use foam rollers to roll out a coat and a very good badger hair brush for tipping. Tipping has an "art" aspect to it. I would experiment with a test panel first to determine how much pressure to use with the tipping brush. I also thin Brightside ( 5%) before rollering it. Thinner coats seem to flow better after tipping.

Answered on 09/06/2011 by ALFRED JOYAL
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Question

Does this material need clear coat after?

Asked on 07/23/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

what is the max recoat time?

Answered on 10/18/2015 by cliff Easley
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The brightsides goes on as a gloss. No need to put on a clear coat, but I reccomend 2-3 coats with wetsanding between coats for a deeper gloss finish.

Answered on 07/23/2015 by James Moynihan

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Wow. I would contact the manufacturer. I have used several gallons of the white and red with great results. Dries to a beautiful smoothe finish with a nice shine. Interlux has answered my questions in the past. Ps red will take two coats to cover well. Use the gray primer

Answered on 07/23/2015 by NATHAN TESLIK

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No

Answered on 07/23/2015 by MICHAEL GERRITY

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No

Answered on 07/23/2015 by PAVEL HRUZA

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It definitely needed something else, but I do not know what. I painted the top deck on my houseboat and less than a year later the paint began to crack and chip. I was very disappointed. I have not repaired it yet, but desperately need to before leaks develop. I had heard Brightside was the best, but it did not work great for me.

Answered on 07/29/2015 by YVONNE EVRIDGE

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No clear coat needed. Gloss rises to the top as it cures. wont need wax for quite some time also.

Answered on 07/23/2015 by JOHN CROSSON

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No.

Answered on 09/15/2015 by RAYMOND GAULIN

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No

Answered on 07/27/2015 by MICHAEL MCGARTY

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No clear coat required

Answered on 07/23/2015 by SPENCER FINN
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Question

Have you ever used this on the outside of a house for wood trim?

Asked on 09/01/2011 by Debbie McKeon

Top Answer

I haven't used Brightside to paint the house trim. I've only used Brightside to paint the interior of the lockers on our boat, I'm very pleased with the results; a nice hard shinny surface. I think it's a good idea and worth trying.

Answered on 09/02/2011 by GUY JOHNSON
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I prefer this paint to all others for small wooden boats. It goes on easily, looks good, and stays looking good. It's easy to wash. Obviously, it's very durable. I don't see why it can't be used on a house, though it's kinda pricey. You get what you pay for, and if it lasts, perhaps in the long run, it's not so pricey.

Answered on 09/01/2011 by GRENVILLE WHITMAN

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i have not... i would expect it to be incredible though the stuff wears like iron, and has a brillant shine. i would reccomend it for that application.

Answered on 09/01/2011 by DANIEL FORNEAR

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No, Debbie, I have not. But Brightside is a premium paint intended for use on the topsides of a boat in a marine environment. This would certainy be more severe weathering than almost any home would experience so I am confident it would weather as well as any house paint. Brightsie is also glossy, which is not the typical choice for house paints---glossy finish allows easy washing and removal of dirt but could be esthetically incorrect. Brightside is probably less tolerant of an expanding/contracting surface than house paint so if your trim is wood and not in good condition it might crack more than you want. Finally, you should expect that Brightside will not allow extended brushing time so get it where you want it and leave it alone! To avoid brush (or roller) marks be sure to reduce it with the correct thinner and enough so that you can get the smooth finish you want berfore it starts to set.

Answered on 09/02/2011 by THOMAS STEARNS

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Hi Debbie, Yes. I applied it to my wood shutters and they turned out great. No cracking and the finished hasn't even begun to fade yet. If it was high gloss latex, it would have dulled by now. It was a bit of an investment of time, with special primer and multiple coats with 24 hrs and sandings in between, but the result was well worth it and I expect it to last at least 7-10 years. Good luck, E.

Answered on 09/01/2011 by ERIK JENSEN

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It would hold up fine, but the paint is high gloss and the preparation work and cost woudl far exceed latex house paint.

Answered on 09/01/2011 by JAMES BRONSON

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No, I have not. Will it work? Yes. Will it be more difficult than paint? Yes. Will it last long, very long. I have had it on my boat for years and I have been impressed, but I take care of the thing.

Answered on 09/01/2011 by ROBERT STAHL

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No. I'm sure it would work, though it is high gloss and designed to be scuff-resistant, so it may not be exactly what you want. Why not try house paint?

Answered on 09/01/2011 by ALEX COMB

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I have used it extensivily on my boat and it's GREAT! If it holds up on a boat, it's going to hold up well on your house.

Answered on 09/02/2011 by DAN PULEIO C/O DOCTORS BILLING CLER

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Debbie We used brightside on porch railings. It held up better than any typical house paint. After several years we did get some slight mildew. Good luck Dave

Answered on 09/01/2011 by DAVID GORZKA
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Question

Have applied first coat to a fiberglas canoe, and have spots that remain sticky after 7 days. What's my problem?

Asked on 07/21/2014 by Al Bayne

Top Answer

Thanks again Raoul - I will keep you posted

Answered on 07/22/2014 by Al Bayne
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That's encouraging - thanks

Answered on 07/21/2014 by Al Bayne

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I've had very good results with w/ brightside polyurethane. Not certain what may have caused the problem...Is the humidity very high? Did you lay down very thick coats? You may want to wash down the sticky areas w/ paint thinner or their proprietary product reducing solvent 333. Seven days is a long time, Did you paint over existing paint, primer or raw fiberglass resin...epoxy or polyester resin?

Answered on 07/21/2014 by RAOUL RAMIREZ

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I just painted a portion of the cabin inside my boat with the brightside polyurethane over a coat of epoxy. I laid down 3 thin coats with a good quality nap roller and brush, each coat dried with no problems in variable humidity conditions, perhaps laying on a heavy coat may have caused the problem you encountered. Calling Interlux may also be helpful. I'd be curious to know more as I use this paint a lot.

Answered on 07/22/2014 by RAOUL RAMIREZ

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Thanks again Raoul - I guess I thought the sanding took care of the "amine blush". The paint also did not cure in places that did not have new epoxy. I have taped off a small section and am giving it a 2nd coat to see if it will dry, as well as dry the 1st coat in that area. A friend advised me that he has had success with that when his 1st coat of varnish remained sticky.

Answered on 07/22/2014 by Al Bayne

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I don't have a complete answer, but I painted my kayak with Interlux Brightside Polyurethene (yellow) two years ago. I recall that it too about 10 days to harden. I would suggest that it be applied with very thin coats. I used about three. Anyway, the kayak looks beautiful and the paint has held up well, even with my grandsons dragging it along the ground on occasion. I would certainly use it again.

Answered on 07/21/2014 by RUDOLPH SELLITTI

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Thanks for responding Brad. I have been doing this project inside a dry garage. Moisture not a factor. Have used Brightside several times before and have never encountered this problem

Answered on 07/21/2014 by Al Bayne

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Raul, thank you for getting back to me. I have used Brightside several times before and have never encountered this problem. This was a thick first coat over west system epoxy patches that had cured and did not gum-up the sandpaper. It was also over some areas on the canoe that had not received any epoxy that were also sanded. I would say about 20% of the area has sticky spots. Is it necessary to remove all the paint or just the sticky spots? Would mineral spirits work as well as paint thinner?

Answered on 07/21/2014 by Al Bayne

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Al, Rudolph's answer is encouraging; he indicates it took ten days for the paint to dry on his project, so perhaps just waiting a bit longer rather than removing the paint. Epoxy has what I believe is called an "amine blush" which needs to be washed with soap and water, I've used TSP in the past, don't know if that could have been the problem. Incidentally, I don't think there is a difference between paint thinner and mineral spirits, it's just a conspiracy to confuse us amateurs.

Answered on 07/22/2014 by RAOUL RAMIREZ

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Al, the only time I experienced this problem is when water came into contact with the freshly painted surface before it was fully cured.

Answered on 07/21/2014 by BRAD MCBRIDE
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Question

I want to use this paint for doing the cove stripe on my sailboat. It is approximately 8 inches and runs the length of the vessel. When the vessel is heeled over it will be in the water. Will this paint hold up for that application?

Asked on 04/18/2013 by Denise Dexter

Top Answer

No problem! It holds up extremely well if applied according to the instructions. I have been using it for 15 years as a topside paint with no problems, on a wooden boat.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by SEVILLE SIMONDS
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It is an extremely durable paint. I used to recondition the hull on my 11' Boston Whaler Dinghy and it wears like iron. I rolled it on with a sponge roller, then tipped it with a brush. It looks terrific, and if sanded with a high grit sand paper and buffed with compound, it looks like a sprayed on finish. I didn't do this and it still looks sprayed on unless you cdt a couple feet away.

Answered on 04/27/2013 by DAVID MILLER C/O SHADY GROVE HARBOR

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It is what I use for the boot top on my 32' sailboat and it holds up very well for a number of years. You shouldn't have any problem with this paint.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by JAMES BRONSON

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I have used brightside on my hull since it was first produced. I have had problems with it. Please understand as with any paint the wood under it must be perfectly dry before applying the paint. Good luck.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by WAYNE OVERTON

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I have used it down to the waterline on my daysailer and it has been just fine.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by SAMUEL M ALLEN

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Yes the paint will be fine for your boot stripe.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by GUY JOHNSON

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I think it will be ok. I use it on a wood power boat to within a inch of the water line and it doesn't fade and remains slick. You will need to scrub it once in awhile as it will accumulate scum.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by ROGER DEMLER

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This product is a varnish, and a good varnish at that. If you prepare the surface to receive varnish, it will work well. I use it in fresh water and have seen no wearing whatsoever, for the surfaces that make no other contact. I do not have experience in salt water, but I feel it will do the job.

Answered on 04/26/2013 by ROBERT STAHL

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It should be fine. The only time I have seen Brightside pinhole is when under water continuously for 3 or more days. Sounds like you should be well below those times.

Answered on 04/27/2013 by CLASSIC BOAT WORKS

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Hi David, How much paint did your 11ft Whaler job require? I want to put 2-3 coats of Brightside on my 11ft whaler but don't know how much paint to buy. Thanks, Mark

Answered on 12/04/2014 by Mark McConnell
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Question

Can a second coat be applied without sanding the first oat?

Asked on 05/31/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I would lightly sand the first coat. You will get better adhesion and the completed job will look better. Proper preparation is 80% of a good paint job.

Answered on 06/01/2012 by CHRIS TASSONE
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I would guess no... If it were me I would let the first coat cure for an extra, extra, long time ( like 3 or 4 days at least) then lightly sand with some 220 grit sandpaper before I applied a second coat. The Brightside Poly is so expensive, why gamble on messing it up? Just my humble opinion...

Answered on 06/01/2012 by MARK RICE

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Yes you can second coat without sanding but as with any finish, why would you? You will get a better job if you sand lightly with very fine sandpaper. This will make the entire job more smooth and assure adhesion. Dave Sauer Long time boat builder - boat lover

Answered on 06/01/2012 by DAVID SAUER

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Depends on how good the first coat went down. If it is mirror smooth and no dust, go for it. Most of the time a light scuff sand is necessary. 220 grit and higher.

Answered on 05/31/2012 by GREG HOPKINS

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Hi, The datasheet says the first coat must be sanded. They also have a toll free number to call if you want to ask other questions. Good luck! Their data sheet is posted on their website (can't attach URL's to this message!)

Answered on 05/31/2012 by VAN MACOMB

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Yes, some people would sand for a possibly better finish, but for me I find that more work than it is worth

Answered on 05/31/2012 by L.H. TURNER

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No, you must sand with Scotchbrite pads or 320 grit. Bill John

Answered on 05/31/2012 by WILLIAM JOHN - VINTAGE RACE BOAT SH BOA

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I use the Interlux Briteside on cedar canvas canoes. Canvas is some thread and a bunch of holes. There are a lot of peaks and valleys throughout the surface and one off the goals of the paint job is to fill in the valleys and to not over paint the peaks. So, I do sand between coats. The first coat I lightly sand with 100 or 150 grit. The next 3 - 4 coats I use 220 - 320 grit. I cannot speak to surfaces other then canvas but my guess is, it depends on the smoothness of the surface.

Answered on 05/31/2012 by HOWARD CAPLAN

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Always good to read the directions. Sand between coats.

Answered on 05/31/2012 by CHIP ESTABROOKS

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I would recommend a very light sanding -- just enough to scruff up the surface. Brightside is a very slippery paint and it needs a little "tooth" to make it stick.

Answered on 05/31/2012 by PAUL KESSINGER
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Question

we are doing a little boler trailer with the product.. have one 1st coat,, pleased with results.. however with the 2nd coat .. with a little sanding etc do we wipe down with solvent again???

Asked on 07/17/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

We wouldn't use the solvent again (used originally to clean the surface), but we would use a tack cloth to wipe it down.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by REBECCA REID
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It is important for the surface to be free of the sanding residue, so there are different ways you can achieve this. One way is to use a solvent like the brushing liquid 333. Don't use a solvent that is not compatible with the paint or is too aggressive since it could strip the paint. Make sure the paint is well cured (more than 1 day in good summer weather) and don't be too hard on the rubbing. My preference is to use the 3M final stripping pads between coats as opposed to the sanding paper. There are multiple benefits to this: 1)You don't need to wait for the paint to be fully cured to use the stripping pad, 2) It removes very little paint, 3)It creates a good grip between coats, 4) It generates very little residue. I use the stripping pad in combination with compressed air for the cleaning (as opposed to the solvent). If you don't have compressed air you may use a rag dampened with 333 or denatured alcohol to remove the dust.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by MARCELO PEREZ

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i wiped it down "lightly" (not 'wet' cloth, but slightly damp) after each sanding session and was pleased with the outcome (i put on three coats in low traffic areas and up to 5 (thin) in the more abused spots). The only negative i experienced came about 6 months later after an extended rain storm, i found a few areas that got a what looked like a rash... not a full blown 'zit fest', but loads of tiny pinholes. Company said that will happen if there's any moisture able to get under the skin... on the upside.. it was only three areas, and they were easily touched up.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by LYNDA WITT

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yes!!! i have done several jobs with brightside.... the stuff wears like iron, always holds a shine. i love it! wipe it down with interlux 333, and then wipe it down again... it's a minute of work, but it will prevent a bunch of problems.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by DANIEL FORNEAR

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According to Interlux, Brightside MUST be sanded between each coat to give the next coat some "tooth" to adhere to. I called them about this and "hot coating" (putting on the next coat before the present coat completely dries) this is a big "no-no" due to solvent entrapment. I can attest to this, I HAD to try! They recommend 220 - 320 grit wet sanding between coats and allowing 24 hours between coats, from my experience, longer 3 -5 days is MUCH better, this stuff is slow to dry but beautiful when done. Wipe it down with water while it is still wet from sanding then wipe it down well with a good solvent on a lint-free cloth. If the exposed edges of the paint start to craze, give it time to re-harden sand again and use a different solvent. Also, give it at least a week to cure before using it, it hardens slowly.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by ROBERT KERNS

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yes. Second coat after a little sanding. I clean with Denatured Alcohol and a clean rag to get up the paint dust and any dit of oils. Have fun.

Answered on 08/10/2011 by BETHANY MCNELLY

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I dust off with broom, brush, go over with tac cloth, and wipe down with 333 solvent. It just gets all the loose stuff up and onto the rag. It is great paint. I also add a dopplo of Penetrol. Keep the wet edge.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by PETER DROBNY

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I would wipe down with denatured alcohol or mineral spirits then tack rag.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by DONNA KLAHN

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Yes, however, I would check with InterLux as to the proper solvent. I believe you should use Special Thinner 216, also, there is a lot information on the InterLux website.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by HAROLD ELSTON

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I'd tack with either a solvent dampened rag I use the Interlux thinner or regular tack cloth.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by GEORGE SYKES
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Question

Can I paint this over clear epoxy?

Asked on 11/05/2011 by Lisa Egeli

Top Answer

Lisa, There is no problem using Brightside over clear epoxy as long as the epoxy has been sanded to remove the "blush" that some epoxies have. Even if the epoxy manufacturer says there is no blush, it is still best to sand. Also, expect the Brightside to take a little longer to dry/cure for the first coat over epoxy, especially if the epoxy has been recently applied.

Answered on 11/07/2011 by SEVILLE SIMONDS
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Not advisable. Paint over properly prepared surface that includes primer coat for best results.

Answered on 11/07/2011 by PERRY NOVELLI

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Thanks!

Answered on 11/07/2011 by Lisa Egeli

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Thank you for the feedback. Think I've learned I need to prep the surface well, then primekote, then brightside poly. Thanks!

Answered on 11/07/2011 by Lisa Egeli

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Probably this is obvious, but fine grain sandpaper is all you should need, just enough to smudge the clear coat. Oh, yeah, not that this matters so much either, but a washing, whether it be light coat of mineral spirits or slightly soapy water with a rinse afterward is helpful as well. Generally, I use mineral spirits a good deal with all this kind of work, in measured amounts, but just about in every transition....

Answered on 11/07/2011 by ROBERT STAHL

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I have found it might work, but I have used a primer layer first. Where the primer did not stick, I have not really noticed the varnish chipping, but I would recommend using a primer layer of kilz or the like anyway. Try to make the surface porous by sanding. That is probably more important, to the primer layer as well.

Answered on 11/07/2011 by ROBERT STAHL

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no do not do it will flake off i sanded the hul with 100 grit sand paper and it still flake off a lot

Answered on 11/07/2011 by SAIL HARBOR MARINA SWEET LADY KEN MCLANE

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Hi Lisa, I used the Brightside Polyuethane over and epoxy base on a drift boat I built. The epoxy was rolled on to marine ply, I scraped to smooth with a cabinet scraper( I hate the dust from sanding). I tried using the primer but had issues with it drying right. I ended up scraping it off. I ended up brushing tthe paint right on the epoxy. It looks pretty good. If I was to do it again I would seek out a good painter to spray it. It has been on for 3 years without any cohesive failure other than rock hits. Best to you, Doug

Answered on 11/08/2011 by DOUG C/O OLD STYLE LOG WORKS

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Thanks!

Answered on 11/07/2011 by Lisa Egeli
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Question

Can it be applied to previously painted surface?

Asked on 06/04/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes. I would suggest using a fine sandpaper (220+) before the application, but there may be better instructions on the can. I have applied it over previously painted surfaces successfully.

Answered on 06/08/2015 by IVY LINCOLN
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Yes if properly prepared by sanding and cleaning surface to be painted

Answered on 06/04/2015 by KEN DANIELL

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Yes. I applied it over existing Brightside. I sanded with 200 grit to knock off gloss and whatever else had accumulated. No problems with it for two years. Easy application. My paint mixer on a cordless drill is still red from the Brightside. Other paints rinse right off. I let it sit in thinner for 24 hours. Still didnt come off.

Answered on 06/04/2015 by NATHAN TESLIK

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Yes just make sure you break the gloss on the old surface first and sand as smooth as you can.finish with 220 - 320 This paint is high gloss and will show any imperfections

Answered on 06/04/2015 by JOHN CROSSON

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Yes it can but do not use it in the bilge as it has a tendency to peel off if water sits too long.

Answered on 06/04/2015 by RAYMOND GAULIN

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I have used it many times over a painted surface.(not over latex products) Scrape any thing that is loose. Wipe with a prep solvent or Acetone to clean. If the old surface has a gloss, 220 sand to degloss or use a liquid deglosser.

Answered on 06/04/2015 by SPENCER FINN

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Yes definitely, Just prepare properly per instructions on the can. I like to wash with soap and water, maybe wet sand or scrub with a scotch brite if I'm looking for a good finish.

Answered on 06/06/2015 by MICHAEL MCGARTY

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yes

Answered on 06/04/2015 by ROBERT MORROW
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I'm a VERY new boat owner and am already having to repair a couple small chips in the gel coat on the botoom of my fibergalss boat. So I've done all the bondo work, went to a local marine supply store and they recommended this. So I bought and applied the Pre-Kote and the Brightside but didn't know what clear coat to apply. As I was reading it appears this isn't meant for the bottom of my boat. So is there a clear coat I can apply over these? Or do I have to strip off the paint and start over again? any help is appreciated.

Asked on 07/07/2012 by Dave Strickland

Top Answer

You were mislead as Brightside is not meant as a below water line paint. You do not need to take it all off, but need to sand it so a new paint will adhere to it. If you use a clearcoat I would recommend a two part urethane which you need to follow directions closely to apply. Either that or go on Interlux's website and find a bottom finish paint the you can apply. Assume you are not using antifouling but they do make bottom paints for racing sailboats or trailered boats which are taken out of the water. Hope this helps, Ken

Answered on 07/11/2012 by KENNETH ZEGHIBE
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This is a very good varnish meant for water. I use my boat in fresh water only, a small flat bottom boat, but this varnish is on the bottom of it and there is nothing wrong with the coat after 3 years and it is covering epoxy which is, generally, very difficult to keep a coat on.

Answered on 07/10/2012 by ROBERT STAHL

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Hi Dave. I did a complete restoration on an 84 Wellcraft 1 off. I used the Interlux products. i would suggest the bondo be of the waterproof type made by 3m. What makes it waterproof is the thickening agents. Bondo is thickened with talc...very porous. Pre-kote is a good priming product. I did not nor should Brightside be used below the water line! Bright side also achieves its gloss on the surface only and therefore should not be buffed. I think above the waterline a good automotive basecoat clearcoat product provides stunning results. Below the waterline I used the Interlux 2 part epoxy paint. I trailer my boat so I dont need the bottom paint. The best result is to apply with a roller!! A higher nap will give the bottom a texture. Perfect for trapping air therefore yielding more speed and less water resistance. If you used Brightside on the bottom, sand it off! Use the right product.

Answered on 07/11/2012 by ALAN GOLDMAN

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If your repairs were only to spot repairs and not to the whole bottom, I would just apply antifouling after a good sanding. I have found Brightside to be very durable on the topsides, lasting several years with good results without a repaint but I have no knowledge of applications below the water line. I am confident it would last at least as long as a coat of antifouling.

Answered on 07/12/2012 by FRANK PELLEGRINO

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Thank you everyone for your comments. In my case, the repair is definitely below the waterline and my boat is trailered so fouling should not be an issue. I hate to sound stupid but I'm so new at this so I'm going to ask anyway. Most of you seem to be saying I can leave it as is. Are you saying I don't need antying coated over it? Someone had suggested to me spraying on a coat of clear gel coat, would that be possible over this paint? again, sorry for all the followups.

Answered on 07/11/2012 by Dave Strickland

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I have never used a clear coat on Brightside and don't think one is necessary. I am not certain what you mean when you refer to the "bottom" and assume that you mean below the water line. I also assume that your use doesn't require an anti fouling treatment. The Brightside will work below the water line. Since it is not visible final appearance is not important but it should be finished smooth. this is best done by sanding with 400 grit sand paper before the final coat and if necessary or if desired sand with 600 grit paper after the final coat. If fouling is a consideration then a final coat of anti fouling paint should be applied.

Answered on 07/11/2012 by JAMES LAWLOR

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Brightside is fine on the bottom of a trailered boat which I'm betting yours is. It will allow marine growth if left in the water for days or weeks. That is when you need a bottom paint.

Answered on 07/10/2012 by ROBERT KERNS

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As brightside is a topside one part paint, I don't think there is a one part clear coat application that will work. I'm no expert but I don't think that brightside is a good finish for the bottom of the boat. I suggest you contact Interlux to discuss. Good luck.

Answered on 07/10/2012 by MARK MIZE
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