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TotalBoat 5:1 Epoxy Kits
$57.99In Stock
4.6
Based on 240 Reviews
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TotalBoat 5:1 Epoxy Kits Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 76 Questions

Question

which hardner would best to use for replaceing a transom in a small outboard boat.the fast or slow one ?

Asked on 03/24/2014 by leonard t

Top Answer

How much Epoxy should I need to finish a strip canoe 16-18 ft. long

Answered on 07/20/2015 by Jeff Funk
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I replaced the transom in a 14' john boat and I used the slow hardener as it gave me more time to work the pieces in to place. Hope this helps.

Answered on 03/25/2014 by ROBERT SMITH

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not sure if i should even atempt to to do this.the boat is a 1961 mfg carefree,thanks again.

Answered on 03/24/2014 by leonard t

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joel,thank you for your quick responce.

Answered on 03/24/2014 by leonard t

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I would use the slow hardener. It will give you extra time to glass the large area

Answered on 03/24/2014 by KEVIN GUGLIELMELLO

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I only use fast on small pieces or when it's very cold in the shop. Slow gives me enough time to mix, apply, clamp, realize it's not in the right spot, re-clamp, wipe off excess, and use the half ounce I over-mixed to fix the picture frame I broke the day before.

Answered on 03/24/2014 by JESUS CASTRO

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None of Jamestown Distributors hardeners will work. Buy elsewhere.

Answered on 03/25/2014 by Dwayne Glanton Dwayne Glanton

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Lee W: Either hardener will work.What's the temp your working in? That has alot to do with what speed hardener I'd use.

Answered on 08/12/2014 by LEANDREW WILLIAMS

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I personally would use the slow. The longer working time will allow you to go slower and get everything lined up. Be sure and coat all the wood to make it waterproof so it won't rot out. Hope this helps.

Answered on 03/24/2014 by WILLIAM BENEDICT

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Either will work. Use fast hardner in temps below 60 and slow for above. You will have a longer work time and pot life with the slow hardner.

Answered on 03/25/2014 by PHILLIP CRAVEN
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Question

TotalBoat does not seem to have fillers. What brand of fillers should I use? West Systems?

Asked on 11/17/2013 by Jim Selby

Top Answer

Any of the two part epoxy fillers should work well. I have a good amount of West Systems fillers on hand and have used 405 and 406 with great success.

Answered on 11/18/2013 by DEAN CALLAHAN
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I used West Systems' 404 with TotalBoat Epoxy and it worked great. One mistake I made was mixing the fillers into the epoxy outdoors on my sailboat (read windy conditions) and so as I was transferring the filler, it would blow away. Just a heads up. Good Luck.

Answered on 10/07/2014 by WILLIAM WALTERS

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I purchased the System Three 5qt bucket of milled glass fiber from JD. I use it in different brands of epoxy. The fiber has small clumps but thorough stirring removes them. I have thought about trying a flour sifter to remove the clumps but stirring works.

Answered on 11/18/2013 by JOHN HAJNY

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Doesn't matter Jim. Any brand will do. There are more inexpensive ones than West. Paul

Answered on 11/18/2013 by PAUL SALKALN

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We've always liked the West System products, so you wouldn't go wrong using their filler. These Total Boat kits offer tremendous value for bulk epoxy. We recently used it for tabbing in a new bulkhead on an old Tartan 30 sloop - it's great stuff that provides a choice of hardening/handling times. You can also consider using fiberglass mat with the epoxy in larger/deeper areas as an alternative to the filler.

Answered on 11/17/2013 by Roger Tarras

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Yes, I use West System Filler all the time with TotalBoat epoxy, no issues...

Answered on 11/17/2013 by THOMAS SWIFT

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Your own brand. Buy a sieve from the cookware section at your local box store. Sift the sawdust from your table saw, cross cut or band saw. Store it in a used cottage cheese or yogurt container. Do the same with some white flour you stole from your kitchen. Then mix them half and half and put that in a third cottage cheese container. Now you have three fillers of graded fineness. The most useful is the 50/50 blend. It works for all fillets. The sawdust in the mixture prevents it from sagging badly. The flour alone will thicken glue and make it more gap filling. Believe me. I worked as lead man in the laminating/press room of one of America's leading furniture makers. We thickened our glue with flour made from ground walnut shells--the brown made an invisible glue line. Buy some microlite or easy sanding filler from another manufacturer for fairing surface imperfections where strength is not necessary, although flour will work. And finally, take a one and one half inch wide putty knife and grind the working end of it on a wheel or sanding disk to a roughly semicircular shape. Dragging this along the corner where you're making your fillet will result in a perfect arc. Experiment with the shape, it's actually a deep vee with a wide rounded tip which when dragged at an forward-tilting angle leaves the arc. Put your tape on wet and use a nine inch foam roller you've cut into three three inch rollers to push the tape into the fillet.

Answered on 11/21/2013 by DON LARSEN

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You can use any brand filler or thickener you wish. The nature of the work determines what type of filler you use. You can even chop glass mat to add to the resin. Remember it may lengthen cure time. West systems has a very broad range of filers, thickeners and strengthening products. Consider the job it needs to do and choose the proper material.

Answered on 11/18/2013 by MARC BODIAN

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I used the kit the way it came, followed the direction and I had never worked with epoxy or fiberglass at all, it was easy to mix and apply and I fixed a fairly large soft spot on the bow of my sailboat, no more leaks. Worked Great. Highly recomend this kit.

Answered on 11/17/2013 by Delmarva Bojos

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Generally speaking anything can be used as filler. I often use fine sawdust from my table saw. West system fillers are very nice, but depending on what you are doing I often use cabosil, or as the students in my classes call it "snow".

Answered on 11/17/2013 by BRETT BERNHARD
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Question

Can you use epoxy on plywood without fiberglass ?

Asked on 03/12/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Absolutely! In that case it serves as a wood sealer or a primer for a coating of paint. It will degrade if exposed to UV light continuously, like all epoxy coatings without UV inhibitors.

Answered on 03/13/2015 by BENJAMIN THACKER-GWALTNEY
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Hi; I cannot answer that. Used it on a JD Mower hood Worked great for that. I would think using on bare plywood maybe would not work too good.I think plywood would have to be treated first with vanish or a sealer that would not leave a rough finish.

Answered on 03/13/2015 by George Motter

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I'm an artist so I don't worry about things floating, but I have used this epoxy to coat all kinds of things including plywood and mdf. When applying it directly to a wood or wood composites with no fiberglass, I brush it on and chase my brush with a heat gun. The heat causes the epoxy to soak right into the wood. I use it to either make a harder more durable surface or to get a surface that can be sanded perfectly smooth.

Answered on 03/12/2015 by AARON MEYERS

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Yes

Answered on 03/12/2015 by DAVID ANDERSON

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Yes, it can especially with the slow hardener.

Answered on 03/13/2015 by K MATTHEW VICTOR

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Sorry, I can't tell I used it with FG and CF and it worked great. But I din't noticed that when it was dripped over the wooden surfaces it bonded very well and it was clear. Hope it helped,

Answered on 03/12/2015 by JINDRICH DOKONAL

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Yes. If you get the wood warm and put 2-3 separate layers of epoxy on it will seal the wood very well

Answered on 03/13/2015 by KEVIN GUGLIELMELLO

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Sure you can if you wish to seal the wood only. By itself, resin is merely plastic having little stiffness though. The result, if done carefully, will seal out water and have a clear to honey color depending upon resin and substrate.

Answered on 03/13/2015 by THOMAS HEBERT
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Question

can i store the pumps in the product or do I have to remove them after every use?

Asked on 08/06/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I don't remove the pumps, but I have found that if it's not used the resin will start to get thick so if you are using it on at least a weekly basis I find it is ok to leave them in.

Answered on 08/22/2015 by ROBERT BERTHOLD
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Yes you can store the pumps in the product as long as the resin and hardener are not mixed you should be fine.

Answered on 08/06/2015 by Greg Cline

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Pumps can be stored in product for extended periods in my experience.

Answered on 08/06/2015 by PATRICK SHUNNEY

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I have stored the pumps in the containers for up to 4 months at the longest. The epoxy and hardener worked fine. Beyond 4 months I'm not sure.

Answered on 08/06/2015 by Jim Selby

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I am not a pro by any means, but I keep my pumps in the bottle until it is empty.......

Answered on 08/06/2015 by WILLIAM C POWELL

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Always leave the pumps in the product. The pumps will stay charged and you will not have air bubbles or loss of product.

Answered on 08/06/2015 by JOHN HAJNY

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I store them in the product. Had no problems with cloggingbafter 6 months +

Answered on 08/06/2015 by Alan Long
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Question

If this the proper epoxy kit (TotalBoat 5:1) for permanently gluing exterior teak (tongue & groove) decking boards together?

Asked on 01/07/2015 by Walter Ruebeck

Top Answer

Thanks Rick, But what is cabosil and what is the price? Once the epoxy dries, I apply decking caulk, correct, and should I wait a day (24hrs) between epoxy and caulk applications? Walter

Answered on 01/07/2015 by Walter Ruebeck
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Yes, this will work well, I suggest adding a little cabosil to improve the bonding strength.

Answered on 01/07/2015 by Rick White

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That's very reasonable. I also received a reply to my original question that Benjamin (from Jamestown Distr.) answered and his reply was that EPOXY' and TEAKS do not go together because of the teak oils. He said to use "CaulkLife" and that maybe TotalBoat has something. Obviously, this is confusing to me. Please advise. Thanks Again, Walter

Answered on 01/08/2015 by Walter Ruebeck

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It would be best for you to call so we can discuss exactly what you are doing and what you need.

Answered on 01/08/2015 by Rick White

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Thanks, will do and ask for you. Walter

Answered on 01/08/2015 by Walter Ruebeck

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Walter, Cabosil is a silica powder our part # TB-SILICA1 a quart is $6.99. Yes, wait at least overnight for the resin to cure before caulking.

Answered on 01/07/2015 by Rick White

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If you are going to use epoxy at all, this should be as good as any. Epoxy and teak don't play well, as the teak's oil can prevent good bonding. I would go with something like CaulkLIfe or the adhesive bedding compounds. I'm pretty sure TotalBoat has that in their lineup.

Answered on 01/07/2015 by BENJAMIN THACKER-GWALTNEY
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Question

Does this epoxy require sanding between coats? West system does not MAS does.

Asked on 02/24/2014 by JON TAYLOR

Top Answer

For best results, either apply the additional coats within 24 hours of the previous application, or sand (and/or wipe with alcohol) to get the best adhesion.

Answered on 02/24/2014 by CHUCK REYNOLDS
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Answer

Sanding is not required. I do not sand between layups. Although I did a light sand after I had left the prior layups fully cure (I had done three layups and had to leave the project for a couple of weeks before final layers applied). I am not sure the sanding was required, but I wanted to ensure a good bond.

Answered on 02/24/2014 by DEAN CALLAHAN

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I am new at this boat building thing. I have been washing the "blush" off if the epoxy has been curing for more than 24 hours. If less than 24 hours, I have been re-coating and bonding. It seems to be working for me. The blush is the waxy material on the surface. I have been washing it off with water and 3m green scrub pad and wiping dry with towel.

Answered on 02/24/2014 by JONATHAN PHILIPPS

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yes. I have found that it does. After cure there is no chemical bond. Any amount of sanding will improve the mechanical bond. Before sanding make certain the amine blush has been removed, that is, if the particular brand has such. Paul

Answered on 02/24/2014 by PAUL SALKALN

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TotalBoat does require sanding between coats. So does West System, except with 207 hardener. But it is a good idea to sand where ever you bond a piece to the part already coated. TotalBoat is the same as WestSytem and I would suggest that you get all information on using WestSystem epoxy for a complete understanding on the use of these Epoxy systems.

Answered on 02/24/2014 by Leslie Bell

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Jamestown Distributors asked me to reply to your question. It is my understanding that you can use TotalBoat 5:1 in the same manner you apply West Systems epoxy. I presume you are referencing applying the epoxy wet-on-wet. If you are applying additional coats of epoxy to a dried application, you definitely need to sand. For best information, I'd suggest you contact the JD tech staff. I've done it many times and they are excellent. FYI--I've had excellent results using TotalBoat 5:1.

Answered on 02/24/2014 by JOHN RUSSNOGLE

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I believe any epoxy should be sanded between coats

Answered on 02/24/2014 by DAVID ANDERSON
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Question

Is this the proper resin for making carbon fiber repairs? Thank you Scott

Asked on 01/16/2014 by scott kaboos

Top Answer

yes. just finished making a tabernacle using 5.7 0z carbon fiber twill. no problem wetting out. paul

Answered on 01/16/2014 by PAUL SALKALN
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Scott, Have not got that far yet. Just got my first kit this year to try out. I've only done some fairing with it and it seams to work well. I'm going to try it with carbon soon and I think it will work. As to longevity... only time will tell.

Answered on 01/16/2014 by JAMES HOLTHOFF

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I am using this epoxy for new CF parts and I really like it, didn't notice any issues. Good luck, Henry

Answered on 01/17/2014 by JINDRICH DOKONAL

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Epoxy resins are incredibly versatile. Adhesion of epoxy on materials is a function of a mechanical nature, surface prep is important. I have seen etched Teflon pads firmly attached to steel in a commercial marine environment using an epoxy. I would have no reservations about using this epoxy for carbon fiber repairs. Epoxy will yellow in sun light unless manufactured or treated to resist UV.

Answered on 01/16/2014 by JOHN HAJNY

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Polyester, Vinyl ester, Epoxies and others are suitable to use with Carbon fibers, fiberglass etc. in new construction. Independently of brands in case of a repair, the issue is not with the reinforcement material but with the type of resin used during the original construction: epoxy repair in a carbon polyester canoe for example epoxy won_??t work because incompatibility of the resins but for a new laminate yes and moreover epoxy carbon construction would be stronger although more expensive.

Answered on 01/16/2014 by VICTOR CONTENTO

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Yes - the TotalBoat epoxy is as good as the West Systems epoxy.

Answered on 01/24/2014 by CHUCK REYNOLDS

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I have only used TotalBoat 5:1 with polyester cloth - maybe someone else can answer

Answered on 01/16/2014 by JAMES IRVING
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Question

Do I have to use fiberglass cloth with the epoxy? I want to seal the deck not strengthen it.

Asked on 09/21/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The answer is definitely no if the strength is already there... Epoxy will provide a moisture barrier that you are looking for... If there is any flex however, I would look to add something to the structure...

Answered on 09/21/2013 by ED LEACH
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In most cases epoxy resin is muck stronger and not brittle like polyester resin used with fiberglass layups and does not require cloth as long as the substrate is stable. Similarly, thin Gelcoat does not use coth and epoxy resin is even stronger. If your are planning in 'painting' over deck crazing, be aware that the surface must be properly prepped (cracked gelcoat will need to be ground down) since the crazed gelcoat is not a stable substrate. Also, I find that finishing an epoxy resin repair with epoxy based paints produces the best result without delaminination issues. More info regarding exactly what you are working on and hope to accomplish is needed for a correct answer, but I hope my response helps.

Answered on 09/22/2013 by DEAN CALLAHAN

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It depends. If its a one piece deck like plywood and you only want to seal it, you might get away with just using the epoxy for that. If you have a lot seams that will work as the deck expands and contracts, the epoxy will crack at the seams and allow water in. Don't forget you have to paint over it also, epoxy degrades rapidly from UV. Good luck

Answered on 09/21/2013 by TERRY DUVIEILH

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I got the 5 in 1 kit to use with carbon fiber to make an air box for my car. I don't see where it could not be used to seal a deck as long as the deck is clean and will not react with the epoxy and hardener. If you are using it for a sealer I would get the smallest slow kit as it will have more time to self level and you can try it on an out of the way spot to make sure it will work.

Answered on 09/22/2013 by PHILIP SHERLIN

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Epoxy is a great sealer, but it needs to be protected from the sun--it breaks down very quickly if left exposed. You should think about a top coating of uv protective varnish over the epoxy.

Answered on 09/21/2013 by JOHN MILLIKIN

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Captain, You do not need to use cloth with the epoxy/resin. The epoxy will harden into a rock regardless of whether you use cloth. As you note, cloth is required if you want to strengthen a structure, such as the swim platform I re-cored last winter. This is an excellent product and you cannot beat the price. I highly recommend it. Captain Tracy (Mr.)

Answered on 10/01/2013 by TRACY SHEPPARD

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I have used this epoxy to seal and not necessarily strengthen. But I normally over coat with another coating for uv protection. Several coats of epoxy is needed because the wood will move and very small cracks will develop allowing moisture intrusion. With the addition of fiberglass the crazing is virtually eliminated. If you are looking for a natural wood grain use a high quality marine varnish with a uv additive. My mahogany plank seating in a Lightning have faired very well with 2 or 3 coats of epoxy followed by several coats of varnish.

Answered on 09/21/2013 by ALAN DEFOREST
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Question

I have used West Systems epoxy with clear harder. Does Total system compare in color and clearness?

Asked on 04/06/2015 by Winfield Nash

Top Answer

Thanks Chuck, I'll be on vacation next week, and will order some as soon as I get back. Regards, Win

Answered on 04/06/2015 by Winfield Nash
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I think that this product compares very favorably with the West System - e.g., equal or better from ease-of-use and performance standpoints and certainly from an overall cost perspective. However, I've used it only in conjunction with fiberglass cloth and matting and also in areas where I wasn't all that concerned about the product's "finish" characteristics. That being said, it did harden quite clear (not cloudy) and I suspect that it had some yellow tint to it, but not overwhelmingly so, as I didn't really notice it NOT being color-less.

Answered on 04/06/2015 by Roger Tarras

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west and total regular hardner are the same. total clear? I have no experience.

Answered on 04/06/2015 by PAUL SALKALN

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I found it to be clear when mixed, after it hardens it has a yellow tint to it. If left exposed to UV it will become a yellowish brown.

Answered on 04/06/2015 by Tim Waite

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I've used both products in the past - they're pretty close in terms of color, clarity, strength, and durability.

Answered on 04/06/2015 by CHUCK REYNOLDS
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Question

The ad for this product says that it can be used on fabric. Can it be used on sail bags to prevent ripping or was the ad referring to fiberglass fabric?

Asked on 10/21/2014 by William McQuillan

Top Answer

This product will dry to a very hard state when cured. I believe they were referring to using it with fiberglass cloth over wood or some other rigid material.

Answered on 12/14/2014 by TERRY DUVIEILH
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It must've meant fiberglas fabric - this is big-time epoxy that dries hard as a rock!

Answered on 12/05/2014 by Roger Tarras

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The answer to the question is that it can be used on all _??fiberglass fabrics_?? or other _??construction fabrics_??. As the epoxy dries to a solid, it would convert Sail Bags into Sail Boxes!

Answered on 10/21/2014 by PAUL SCOTT

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Thanks for this information. I guess it won't work well for a sail bag.

Answered on 10/23/2014 by William McQuillan

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This product cures to a hard state. It would literally make the bags hard as a surfboard. I used it to make repairs to logs in a cabin. -Eric

Answered on 10/23/2014 by Eric LeVine
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