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Aqua Strip Paint Stripper
$23.01Limited Stock
Back To Nature Aqua Strip paint and varnish stripper or remover, Quart
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Based on 25 Reviews
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Aqua Strip Paint Stripper Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 13 Questions

Question

I have an 18th century brass bed someone painted black. I am not sure what kind of paint was used, it appears to be just one coat of an enamel base paint. My question is, will the Aquastrip ACB damage the brass?

Asked on 05/23/2012 by Jerry Cook

Top Answer

I have used Aqua Strip to remove paint from wooden boats and had excelent results. I am not an expert with metal but the bronze screws and ringshankl nail in the boat were not affected by the Aqua Strip. I would not hesitate to use it on the brass. As always do a test on a small piece first and see what happens. Good luck. AJ

Answered on 05/23/2012 by ANTHONY J DEROSA
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In a short "No" it will not hurt brass just follow the directions.

Answered on 05/24/2012 by MICHAEL ELLIS

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I have not tried it and would certainly recommend testing it on some other brass object first. Don't know what kind of surface you're going to have after removing paint. It may not be so good hence the paint. You may want to speak with a plating company. They would strip everything and replate. They could also tell you what chemical would be bad for the antique finish. This stuff is pretty gentle to skin compared with other stuff. It normally takes a cyanide bath to strip metal plated parts so I think your paint would fall right off before any damage happens to the brass.

Answered on 05/23/2012 by PETER SLOCUM

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I would not recommend contact with brass.

Answered on 05/25/2012 by ROGER FIROR

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In a short "No" it will not hurt brass just follow the directions and all should be fine!

Answered on 05/23/2012 by MICHAEL ELLIS

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I doubt it would hurt the brass. I have had the stripper get on bronze thru-hull fittings and it does not hurt them

Answered on 05/23/2012 by GEORGE MAUPIN

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yes it will do with out any damage. i do lots of work on boats restore lots of brass cover with paint and was very good ended with aqua strip .very good stuff and it work .. good luck

Answered on 05/26/2012 by ABDELSALAM ABDELSALAM

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Should be ok on brass. I would clean it well with soap and water afterwards. I used it on bronze thruhulls while trying to strip bottom paint. I don't know what you should use after that to keep the brass from tarnishing, maybe varnish.

Answered on 05/23/2012 by ROGER DEMLER
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Question

I want to remove many coats of bottom paint from my fiberglass 25 ft. sailboat. how much do I need? Will it remove the barrier coat that is under the bottom paint? Will it work at 50 degrees?

Asked on 01/23/2012 by Robert Mansfield

Top Answer

(Sorry it took so long to respond; mailbox problems) It's very hard to say and very much depends on a lot of different factors. (Don't you just love answers like that?) Figure on two applications per section. I just did a Hunter 260 with 8 or 10 coats of paint on it and despite my best efforts and some tricks I've learned along the way it still always took two tries to get it all. I would guess the type of paint would make a difference, but probably not that much. That much paint is a lot to ask. Anyway, a few things: PAY ATTENTION TO THE AMBIENT TEMPERATURE. The instructions say that it works best between 60 & 80 degrees F. I would add that, outside of those temperatures it barely works at all. Second: plan on leaving it on for 24 hours. Third: Slop it on very thick. Don't think of it as "painting" it on; rather, think of it as "smearing" as thick a layer as you can. The thicker it is the better it works. Fourth: Cover it up while it's curing. I tape on thin, cheap, flimsy plastic drop cloths and/or strips of plastic wrap. Otherwise, it dries out and you can't get it off. Keep it wet. Repeat 10 times. Fifth: Go get a couple of cheap (but sturdy) plastic ice scrapers (like for your car). I've gone through 20 "putty knife" type things and they just don't allow you to scrape. Metal paint scrapers are just too dangerous for me to try on fiberglass. Ice scrapers are just the thing. Sixth: after the second application (or first if you've only got a couple layers to take off) there will still be some small sots of stuck on paint. Take one of those green kitchen scrubber things and those will come right off. Be sure and rinse the hull as you go. In my experience it does not take off barrier coatings. It's a lot of work but I've tried everything I know of that's on the market and this stuff works far better than anything else, in addition to not being caustic of stinky or, you know, kill you. Wild guess: 3 five gallon cans. Good luck

Answered on 02/09/2012 by WILLIAM ARCHER
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Answer

Hi Robert. I used 1quart to remove the bottom paint on my 18f 99 Seadoo Sportster 1800 that a previous owner applied. You may have to use the strong one because you have many coats. Make sure that you apply a generous coat so the paint will pop loose. Good luck. Junior Laurel, Md.

Answered on 02/02/2012 by JUNIOR AURICCHIO

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I used this product to remove multiple layers of bottom paint from my 25 Bertram. The key lesson I learned was to ensure the product stayed wet. Once it dries it stops working. Since I did the work outside, in summer, I had to work with small sections at a time. I taped off an area of the hull, applied the product (as much as possble), and then covered the area with plastic sheeting to prevent evaporation. I let it sit for a day before removing the plastic. This technique removed all layers - down to the gelcoat. I works, but it is a tedious, dirty job. I would never do this again. Instead, I would have the hull soda blasted.

Answered on 01/30/2012 by CAMERON STUART

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I had about 3 coats of old bottom paint on my boat when I used Aqua Stripper. In some areas I did have to re-apply but for the most part I put a thick coat on and waited about an hour. Key was doing it out of the sunlight. As the day went on, I noticed when I was applyiing it in the sunlight it would dry faster and not really penetrate the bottom paint. And I did it in the spring and temps were around 50 degrees or higher. Last the company recommends using a plastic scraper. Plastic scraper worked not so well. What I did was get a metal scraper and I dulled the corner edges of it so as not to gouge the bottom of the boat. That worked many times better than a plastic scraper. Last wear a tyvac suit, fully sealed eye goggles and hat, you're gonna get messy.

Answered on 01/24/2012 by JEFFREY SMITH

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I stripped hull paint (one good coat) down to the gelcoat from a 19" center console and it took every bit of a gallon. At 25ft and with multiple coats I'd start at 2 gallons but it could be double that. If the barrier coat is paint then its probably coming off too- down to the wood,metal,glass what have you. The trick I found was to apply it as thick as possible and let it sit as long as possible. When it turns colors on you yet is still a little damp, seemed to be the easiest time to scrape. Heat, humidity, and wind play a big part. If it's windy don't bother- It drys before it does anything. I tried plastic wrap over it in these conditions with mixed results to say the least. I did my job in mid may at probably 75 degrees. I am not sure if 50 is warm enough to thoroughly activate the stripper. Any chance of moving it indoors. Watch the ventalation though the vapors can be harsh. Good luck

Answered on 01/24/2012 by ANTHONY MITCHELL

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A dirty, messy job however you look at it. It's very hard work and depending on how many layers there are, it will take 1 to x applications. Toxicity wise, this is probably the safest way to remove bottom paint. To do the job most efficiently you need good access at a good working height, crawling under a trailer adds significant time, effort and pain. Temperature wise, the application needs to stay damp to work. Don't know about 50 degrees, it might be inert at that temperature. My problem was environment was too hot. Bottom line is the stuff shifts eveything down to the FG without damaging the FG. If you're young and physically fit, why not? Having tried it, I have turned my sights on soda-blasting as an easier alternative. I haven't tried it though but the costs could easily justify the savings in physical torment.

Answered on 01/24/2012 by JEAN-PAUL FELIX

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Robert, we did not use Aqua Strip to remove bottom paint so we can't answer any questions in that area. We did use it to strip the teak on our sailboat and it worked quite well. It was easy and did a good job and would buy it again for that purpose. Charlie

Answered on 01/24/2012 by CHARLES PIPER

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I tried this as a cheaper alternative to soda blasting. It didn't work for me. I have a 32 foot sailboat with many built up layers. I tested it several times and what it removed was worthless. I was using it at a much warmer temp than 50 degrees to. I ended up throwing at least half a can of this away. Maybe it would work in a different application, but with many years of built up paint.......no way.

Answered on 01/24/2012 by THOMAS ELLIS
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Question

Has anyone tried it on woodwork? I want to refinish the inside woodwork that has one coat of shelack. Put on around 1915.

Asked on 12/27/2011 by Charley May

Top Answer

Hi Charley- The stripper works great though it takes longer than more aggressive, chemical strippers. spread it on liberally and be patient (maybe overnight). However, if I'm not mistaken, shellac no matter how old can be easily removed with alcohol. Might be worth a try on a small section. good luck, Lindsey Horner

Answered on 12/31/2011 by LINDSEY HORNER
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Answer

It should work just fine for your project, I used the Marine version to remove bottom paint on a wood boat and it worked better than 4 other products we tried. I also used it to remove old varnish. Low odor is the best feature. Put it on thick per the instructions so it doesn't dry out. takes a while to work but it does work. Use a spray bottle with water to "re-wet" stuff that gets caught in the corners. Use a nylon brush like an old toothbrush, to remove remaining stripper. You have to remove all the residue or your new finish will re-activate the stripper.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by PETER SLOCUM

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I have used this product on the hull of my boat very succesfully and would recomend it to strip paint from just about anything. It stripped paint from my trailer (that was unintented) with ease as I did not cover it completely with plastic. Advise that what you want to keep undisturbed/stripped be moved away from or covered "COMPLETELY"away from the work being done. Thanks Aqua Strip for an outstanding product!

Answered on 12/29/2011 by MICHAEL ELLIS

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We used this materail to remove not only the original 1923 shelack but also the 8-10 coats of paint on about 5400 lnft of woodwork on a large commercial remodel project. Give the materail time to work and it will do a good job for you.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by TRAVIS BAKER

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Charley, i used Aqua Strip on a 1956 Chris Craft transom and it stripped off varnish and copper bottom paint very well. I experienced no odor and washed residue off with a hose.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by DONALD BARTOLD

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Hi, I used it on paint without much luck. I am refinishing my interior using zip strip which works better than I thought it would. Interior was finished with varnish.

Answered on 12/29/2011 by JOSEPH MATLAGA

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I used it to remove varnish on teak. Worked well, took a little more effort over its less-environmentally friendly competitors, but it DID work. Clean up was much easier, too.

Answered on 12/29/2011 by LAWRENCE CLARK
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Question

How will this stripper affect bedding compounds and sealants used with thru-hulls and keel attachment? Will it affect Marelon thru-hull fittings?

Asked on 02/15/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I used this product to remove a thick coating of old bottom paint on a 23' fiberglass Bayliner and found it to be easy to use and effective on 95% of the old stuff. Never noticed any problems other than it will dry rather quickly on a warm Arizona day !

Answered on 02/15/2012 by BARRY MCKENZIE
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I had no problems with this product attacking anything other than the paint surface that I wanted removed. It did not bother any thru-hull fittings that I have on my sailboat. This product was easy to use and did not have any bad odors as it worked off the bottom paint. It did require some minor mechanical work to finish the hull clean up and surface prep. Wonderful stuff.

Answered on 02/15/2012 by MICHAEL ELLIS

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I'd replace any sealant it comes in contact with.it's best with a razor blade scaper.it doesn't work as good as the video I watched on the website,good luck

Answered on 02/17/2012 by JIM JANKUN

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i used the stripper on an aluminum, centerboard boat w/ welded thru-hulls. so i really don't know. sorry.

Answered on 02/15/2012 by PAUL TULLOS

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I don't know how it will affect your specific bedding compound. I used it to remove bottom paint on a lapstrake hull with 5200 between the laps. the paint removed and the 5200 stayed in place. I would test it first on separate fittings or call the bedding compound manufacturer. I used Aqua Strip Marine which is one step stronger than regular aqua strip.

Answered on 02/15/2012 by PETER SLOCUM
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Question

has anyone used Aqua-strip on a Corvette?

Asked on 07/31/2011 by Douglas Dyer

Top Answer

Doug - I used Aquastrip on a boat - sorry, I can't help. -Jeff

Answered on 08/05/2011 by RICH HAMILTON
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Answer

Used it on a boat. Scary how well it worked. Don't wana know. Ate some of the trailer paint also - which was getting redone anyway.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by MICHAEL PARKER

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I used Aqua Strip Marine which is a little stronger than aqua strip. I used it to remove anti-foul paint from a wood boat bottom. It works as advertised and better than the other strippers without all the smell. Follow the instructions. It's made to take paint off of fiberglass. i don't see why it wouldn't work. Maybe try it on a scrap piece from a junk yard first

Answered on 08/04/2011 by PETER SLOCUM

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Easy to use and quite effective, although like all strippers, can be messy. Would highly recommend.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by IAN WILSON

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I used Aquastrip on a boat and stripped away old enamel paint from a gel-coated surface. It worked great, but takes time (4-6 hours). I wet the surface with a spray bottle just before scraping the stripper/old paint off. It worked very well, though I did a second coat of Aquastrip as the paint was quite thick. It did not harm the gelcoat at all and I used it inside the boat cabin with no respirator/mask as it gives off no harmful fumes. I used a plywood board like an artists paint pallet when scraping off to collect the scrapings as I went along, much better than having the stripper/paint drop onto the cabin floor, etc. You must protect any areas you do not want affected- thin plastic drop cloths work fine. Great stuff I would use again, though not cheap.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by BEDE MCCORMACK
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Question

used this product last year, but found stripping tedious, with only 1 layer at a time coming off - and the paint was about 10 layers thick. this certainly did not match the video. what was I doing wrong? suggestions?

Asked on 11/17/2014 by james mcclung

Top Answer

actually, i never ended up using it. sorry for the lack of help.

Answered on 11/17/2014 by PAUL TULLOS
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Answer

Buy Jamestown's Circa 1850 Heavy Body Paint and Varnish Remover. Slather it on as thickly as you can and wait half an hour or so. Now apply more on top of what you already slathered on, paying particular attention to any dryish or dull areas. Now leave it alone for a couple hours. Then go after it with a good scraper like Sandvik with BAHCO blades. I cannot promise you will get through all 10 coats the first pass, but you will certainly get half of them. The key with strippers is letting them work. We have used Aqua Strip, but typically must let it work for 24 hours to get the same results we can with Circa 1850 in a third the time. Good luck. Stripping paint is the worst part of any restoration project for sure.

Answered on 12/29/2014 by MICHAEL CLAUDON

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not sure this qualifies as an answer. is there no one who has used this product? jim

Answered on 11/17/2014 by james mcclung
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Question

Is it possible to strip. Cabinet finish like lacquered or vanishe too?

Asked on 03/03/2014 by Serog Haghverdi

Top Answer

sorry, dont know. used it for bottom paint,

Answered on 03/03/2014 by PAUL TULLOS
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I've never tried this product on those finishes, and can't speak to its ability to perform for that function. Aqua Strip works fine on marine bottom paint and is a lot less "fumy" than other chemical strippers I've used.

Answered on 03/03/2014 by TED ALLEN
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Question

can I use this to strip sickens teak sealer and varnish without affecting the black poly urethane strips between the teak boards

Asked on 07/22/2017 by gary from Harbor Springs, Michigan

Top Answer

If they are painted the answer is no, it will remove the paint. If it's not painted try a small area first to see if it affects the poly strips.

Answered on 10/11/2017 by JD Tech Team
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Question

can this be bought at a retail store anywhere ?

Asked on 07/14/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Home Depot

Answered on 03/09/2017 by
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Question

Will this work for stripping bowling alley wood?

Asked on 02/24/2015 by Gregg Ulik

Top Answer

Sorry, I don't know

Answered on 02/25/2015 by PAUL TULLOS
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