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WEST System G/flex 650 Liquid Epoxy
$26.26In Stock
WEST System G/flex 650 Liquid Epoxy Kits - 8 oz.
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WEST System G/flex 650 Liquid Epoxy Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 51 Questions

Question

will this adhere to polyethylene and or polypropylene?

Asked on 08/12/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It adheres to Polyethylene nicely if you flame treat the material first. Just a few light passes with a torch prior to bonding is all that's really needed.

Answered on 01/06/2014 by CHRIS CONNOR
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You should find the answer in the package leaflet, or go on line to read about G-Flex

Answered on 08/13/2012 by JANE SEA KAYAK CAROLINA

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I have only used it on metals. I would guess that the epoxy might not adhere to polypropylene because propylene has such a smooth surface. You need to do a test, if it does not work- at least you will have some fine epoxy for other products.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by RODNEY KIRTSINGER

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I have an old plastic kayak that is rotomolded but not sure which poly is used. I took a chance and the G/Flex was wonderful. It stuck and sealed completely and it's flexible as advertised. A local Kayak shop told me about the kit.

Answered on 08/15/2012 by DAVID BIRNBAUM

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I have not personally used G Flex to repair plastics, but, West systems has instructions to repair plastic kayaks, which I believe are made from polyethylene. You tube has several videos on the subject. I would suggest looking there. Good luck

Answered on 08/14/2012 by PETER BACH

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Yes, Please see GFLex instructions for proper surface preparation. It may involve flame treating. I have had success using GFlex product to bond with both polyethylene and or polypropylene.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by PAT OTTON

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It was the only thing that worked to patch my sit on top kayak which I believe is polyethylene. So far it has held up great. I followed some hints on the web for prepping the surface and then just followed the instructions.

Answered on 08/14/2012 by JOE PARKER

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I used it to adhere polycarbonate to fiberglass and it worked very well. So I suspect it would work with PE or polypropylene as well, but have not used it to do so. I sanded the polycarbonate first to provide a rough surface.

Answered on 08/14/2012 by Kevin Gardner

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I bought it in May, but have not used it yet. It was for repairing my camper. The rot was more extensive than I thought and took longer to cut out. I planned to use the West System G/Flex to re-attach the fiberrglass body panels to new plywood. I'm not at that step yet. I'm sorry I can't offer you more assistance.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by DENNIS BRINTON
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Question

Does G Flex dry as clear or amber color?

Asked on 12/28/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

it dries an amber color from direct experience. West systems says the thickened version of G/Flex is darker.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by MICHAEL TIMMER
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The GFlex is clear, it appears amber over kevlar, or white when silica is added. Good stuff Man! But clear and super.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by LES WILSON

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There is an amber cast to the dried resin.

Answered on 12/29/2011 by THOMAS MANI

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light Amber

Answered on 12/28/2011 by NATALE MARASCO

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The product dried with amber color. Great product to work with.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by JOHN ROUNTREE

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It is a light amber after drying

Answered on 12/29/2011 by JAMES HUDSON

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Dear shopper; G/flex does indeed dry clear. I have varnished over it with Interlux Schooner varnish with excellent results. If you intend to varnish over, I would sand at least with 180 grit or 220 grit but would not use 320 or higher until at least after two coats and then would use 320 grit. I am testing a peice with prekote from interlux and the 1st. coat seems to have worked well even though in the data sheet it recommends not to. It recommends using primekote but in their boat painting guide they recommend prekote. Seems that there is some ambiguity when using a finish primer over a clear epoxy, thus the test peice. Primekote is a finish primer for the two-part epoxies and is not compatible with a one- part such as brightside. I have used g/flex extensively and have used it blended with 105/207 clear and have found that I like the results. The blended viscosity and wet-out charateristics are proportional to the ratios of the blend. good luck and do not be afraid to test some peices before actually doing the real work. Leslie

Answered on 12/29/2011 by Leslie Bell

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Gflex dries amber colored.....

Answered on 12/29/2011 by kc kc

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When mixing the clear & amber components, the amber color lightens a bit but it's still amber. When hardened, it retains the same amber color it had when mixed.

Answered on 12/28/2011 by bob the builder bob the builder
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Question

I'd like to use G/flex to repair a split in a varnished teak cockpit coaming. To match the color of the existing teak, I'm thinking of sanding a piece of similar teak and adding the sanding dust to the epoxy before applying it to the split. Would it be acceptable to add the sand dust to the G/flex?

Asked on 02/27/2014 by Gerald Saunders

Top Answer

I have a board of the same teak for sanding, and I'm going to try it. I think I'll have the G and T's when I do the job - that should help.

Answered on 02/28/2014 by Gerald Saunders
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If it is just a split, and the two parts fit well together, and you can clamp it ok, there is no need to add sanding dust as the color of the cured epoxy will match the teak color fairly well. Even if you cannot get a proper clamp to it, masking tape has enough elasticity to it that it will have enough pressure to keep the joint closed while the epoxy cures.

Answered on 02/27/2014 by PETER BACH

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Yes, but be sure to mix the epoxy very well BEFORE you add the dust, otherwise it may not cure properly. Also, my experience with this is that the mix will be darker than the original wood, you might experiment first.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by James Hess

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It might be slightly darker but the dust will work well!

Answered on 03/06/2014 by NATALE MARASCO

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Adding a little sanding dust will not affect the bonding characteristics of the Epoxy. If i understand you right, basically you have a narrow gap in the wood that needs to be filled. Adding some sanding dust would be appropriate. Try mixing some on the side, and see what the color is after it cures. I have used epoxy and walnut sawdust to fill the voids in black walnut, and it works famously. There is such a wide color spectrum of teak. I bet it will work just fine. after a few gin and tonics and a few months, you won't be able to see it.

Answered on 02/28/2014 by PETER BACH

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Thanks, James - I'll try a little first

Answered on 03/10/2014 by Gerald Saunders

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I've used this process with other glues. I'm sure it would work, however watch your time as glue might set up . This glue has more consistency than most wood glues. I'd try it on a scrap piece first.

Answered on 02/27/2014 by TED MROZEK

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Thanks, Peter. The split is not of structural concern - the teak coaming board is attached to the deck edge and I don't think clamping will actually compress the gap. The split is along the grain and does not reach the edges of the board and is relatively narrow (~1/32"). I'm looking for both adhesion (not allowing the gap to widen) and filling (so that varnish will adhere to the surface.) To give you the picture, something like 3M 5200, which I am not thinking of using, would leave a noticeable white line along the grain. I'm hoping to approach an invisible repair. Would sanding dust in the epoxy help? Would it adversely affect the bonding characteristics of the epoxy?

Answered on 02/27/2014 by Gerald Saunders
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Question

how to apply a coating, like paint, over gflex epoxy?

Asked on 03/10/2014 by dave watts

Top Answer

I am using an acetone based product to coat over the g/flex. What type of primer did you use and would it work with an acetone based coating. Actually I have already prepped/coated this area, but it only peeled off in the area of the g/flex patch.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by dave watts
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I mix it per directions and thin it (with thinner). I just use a roller to apply. Right, wrong, or indifferent, that is how I do it and it works well for me. just pay attention to how warm or cold the air is as it has an impact on set up and curing.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by MATTHEW DECKER

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james, thanks. i'm looking into a primer that you'd apply on top of the g/flex once it has cured. the acetone paint I used did not adhere very well to the g/flex epoxy area even after a though sanding. Dave

Answered on 03/10/2014 by dave watts

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I mix it per directions and thin it (with thinner). I just use a roller to apply. Right, wrong, or indifferent, that is how I do it and it works well for me. just pay attention to how warm or cold the air is as it has an impact on set up and curing.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by MATTHEW DECKER

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We wash the area with soapy water. Scuff with a 3m sanding pad, around 200 grit Prime and paint

Answered on 03/10/2014 by MICHAEL GREY

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Wash the cured epoxy with water, dull the surface with sandpaper & apply varnish, paint, whatever.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by James Hess

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I used G/flex with bi-axial weave cloth to fair a keel joint. I also used it to make the fairing putty from silica and micro balloons. I over coated with Interprotect 2000E after fairing the G/flex down. Two years and no problems.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by JAMES BEMISS
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Question

I am sealing leaks in an aluminum boat and it will eventually be painted with single stage automotive paint. Is there any issue with painting over GFlex and is there any special preparation to be done before painting? Thanks to all!

Asked on 08/19/2012 by Larry Brown

Top Answer

I bought the G-flex with the same thing in mind. I just took a wire wheel to the boat, took off all the old paint down to the bare metal, applied the G-flex, let it set up and repainted it and have not had any trouble with it what-so-ever. hope this helps

Answered on 08/20/2012 by RAWLEY EVANS
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I am sorry I cannot help you with that. We used it as an adhesive to clad wood with copper sheeting.

Answered on 08/20/2012 by FRANK BERRONES

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I JUST PAINTED MY BOAT, I USED G-GLEX ON EVERY RIVET AND SEVERAL CRACKS AND PIN HOLES, I JUST LIGHTLY SANDED IT AND PRIMED, THEN PAINTED OVER IT. IT IS EARLY, BUT LOOKS LIKE ITS DOING GREAT ROBERT

Answered on 08/20/2012 by ROBERT SPANGLER

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Larry, I won't be able to answer you questions since I was using the product on a radio controlled model Soling sailboat to seal the deck to the hull of the model boat. Sorry. Dave

Answered on 08/21/2012 by DAVID MCNASH

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We use this product as a wood filler. We only varnish over it and do not use any paint.

Answered on 08/24/2012 by ROSLYN BOCK

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G-flex is an epoxy resin, standard boat stuff. I have had no problem with both water base & solvent finishes. Contact mfg. if you need more info, they are very helpful.

Answered on 08/20/2012 by James Hess

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Epoxy generally accepts paints just fine, as long as their surface is sanded to remove the gloss. I would test a small area or better, a sample before jumping in whole hog. Give the epoxy at least 3 days, better is a week, to fully cure before sanding, priming and painting.Then let the paint cure well. test with some sticky tape. If the tape pulls the paint away easily, then the bond is no good and you need to rethink the method or materials. Hope this helps brian

Answered on 08/20/2012 by BRIAN RUSSELL
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Question

is this product clear gloss?

Asked on 02/14/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It dries glossy and transparent but has a brown tint to it.

Answered on 02/14/2015 by Randy B
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Answer

No epoxy is entirely clear that I know, including this one. Yes, it is somewhat glossy after it sets but not like varnish. If you had said what you are using it for maybe I could have been more helpful in my answer.

Answered on 02/14/2015 by CHRISTOPHER CAPOTIS

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No, it dries more an amber color with a satin gloss finish

Answered on 02/15/2015 by SEAN TRISCH

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Yes it is. I have varnished over it with very good results.

Answered on 02/14/2015 by Leslie Bell

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Ni it looks like honey

Answered on 02/14/2015 by NATALE MARASCO

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It is a transparent amber that is glossy under the curing "bloom".

Answered on 02/14/2015 by bob the builder bob the builder
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Question

can i repair cracked aluminum heliarc welds on my boat with g-flex650?

Asked on 03/14/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

If it is a hairline crack, yes you can. It work well on rivets and loose joints. I did a hairline crack in a weld in the bow of my 14' boat.

Answered on 03/14/2014 by THOMAS ZALESKI
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I used it to wick into a riveted keel on an older boat that had small leaks(rivets). After turning the boat upside down and heating the area with a propane torch to warm I brushed the gflex and it wicked in to seal any water entry areas. Worked great. Don't really know if your application would work as I had keel and staves that had cracks heliarced. Gflex is flexible and I don't think it could be defined as structural for your use. Laminating wood might be the ultimate marine application? Regards

Answered on 03/14/2014 by STEPHEN DEXTER

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I used it on a cdoss bow so it got a lot of flexing.Worked fine.

Answered on 03/15/2014 by DUANE WILLIAMS

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I have only used it for glueing wood if there is no stress on the weld and it is only for cosmetics I guess it may work. probably you should just have it rewelded

Answered on 03/14/2014 by EASTPORT CUSTOM BURGESS

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Wish I could help but I used G-Flex to protect the end of a wooden greenland paddle. It worked well but that does not answer your question.

Answered on 03/14/2014 by PETER RILEY

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Not real sure about the welds , But I did my rivets and this product seems to holding up very well ...

Answered on 03/14/2014 by JOHN EHMAN
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Question

will this plug a 1/4 inch hole in a polyethylene boat?

Asked on 09/07/2016 by Tim Doe

Top Answer

I use it to fill 1/2" holes in snowboards (I mount new hardware inside the boards) witch undergo a LOT of flex stress and it is unbreakable.

Answered on 09/14/2016 by STEFANI HENDRY
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I first started using G/Flex to cement neoprene shock mounts to plywood to fix my M-in-Law's 50-year old Eames Dining Chairs, and none of the repairs has failed. I have since used it for hanging metal tools like axes and hammer heads on wooden handles. Again, rock solid joins. I even rebuilt the handle of an Estwing masons hammer, replacing an inch long section of handle by using tape to create a cup on the end of the handle, and filling the cup with G/Flex which bonded securely to the metal core and flexible blue grip synthetic. Here is the caveat: I mix the G/flex in recycled PETE (polyethylene terephthalate food cups and after it is cured, the leftover skim of epoxy in the cup peels off in a thin sheet, leaving no cured product behind, so it does not bond to the mirror smooth PETE. I don't know if the PE in the boat will act the same way. After blending the resin and hardener I add west's 406 colloidal silica to the consistency of cake frosting so that it does not drip or run. If the through hole were slightly countersunk inboard and outboard an epoxy plug could be formed that would not easily push out of the hole. When cured it is easily filed and sanded to match surrounding contours; the color is creamy egg custard yellow. I say give the G/Flex a try. Even if it doesn't fix the boat, you will find uses for it around the shop, I am about ready to order my THIRD quart kit. If the epoxy does not work, perhaps P-Tex candle like that used for ski base repair might work.

Answered on 09/08/2016 by CHARLES WARD

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This is hands down the best epoxy I've ever used. If you properly prepare the surfaces it will fill gaps and it's very strong due to the fact that it's felixble. For patching a hole, you might want to incorporate some Fiberglas patches or plug one side and let it flow and settle. It does take at least 12 hours before you can even touch it, but after 24 it's very impressive.

Answered on 09/07/2016 by ADAM BALKOVIC

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Hi Tim, Depends, it is fairly liquid and probably would not stay in the hole. Perhaps the thickened version would work but I have not used it. If you could some how get the hole horizontal and contain the G/flex so that it bonded on both sides then it may work. It is a very strong adhesive.

Answered on 09/08/2016 by KERRY BEYELER

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Most likely yes. Flame treat the surface first and put a small patch on the inside and you'll likely be fine. This is amazing stuff.

Answered on 09/08/2016 by CHRIS CONNOR
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Question

I am looking for a flexible epoxy that is crystal clear. What is the transparency of this product after drying?

Asked on 03/09/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The epoxy dries to a lighter shade of the darker bottle. Since you mix the clear and dark 50/50, the dark color is lighter after drying. It does not dry clear.

Answered on 03/09/2016 by Lamar Warren
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If my memory serves me right it was a slightly yellowish when dried.but I was not concerned with color and did'nt pay it that much attention.strength was my main concern.But usually its not really noticeable.wish I could have answered more definitively for you.

Answered on 03/10/2016 by STEVEN VASSALLO

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As you can see, the hardener is a tan/brown color and the epoxy itself is clear. Since you're mixing a 1 to 1 ratio of clear epoxy and brown/tan hardener, it lightens up but still retains a yellow color. It's a similar color to a urethane finish when dried.

Answered on 03/14/2016 by JACK HOVANEC

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I used the epoxy on the edge of my split board, and also to repair a canoe. I did not need it to be transparent, just strong. It is not the same as looking through clear glass, but is is pretty clear.

Answered on 03/09/2016 by CATHERINE MAXWELL

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This is will no dry clear. It has an orange color to it.

Answered on 03/09/2016 by REYNALDO PIZARRO
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Question

is this the right product to fix my leaky aluminum boat at the seams and revets?

Asked on 10/13/2011 by Larry Dubois

Top Answer

It should work, if done properly, although I never used it for Aluminum but did use it on a Brass Rudder. That means that the repair area must be very clean. After hand abrading it with say 100/80 grit sandpaper I would use cleaners especially made for aluminum to be sure the area is very clean. I suppose Acetone should work as a cleaning agent. I would mix and apply a coating of G/Flex and let it get sticky, just about dry, then I would mix another batch of G/Flex and add W/S 425 copper compound as per instructions, mix well and apply to the repair area. Throw away brushes would work well for all repair. Let it all set well for sanding. Once sanded lightly ( you don't want to remove anymore G/Flex than you have to ), I would mix another batch of G/Flex and add W/S 410 Filler. Mix well to consistency of butter and apply with a squeege, the same used in automotive body shops, depending on wether the repair area is flat or vertical to avoid sagging of the mix.; sand and fair to your satisfaction. I use compressed air for cleaning areas after each step of sanding. In my case I repaired a rudder on a 40' boat which was painted afterwards with bottom paint and it has held up very well. I don't know how well it would hold up without paint though. Good luck !! Chris

Answered on 10/19/2011 by CHRISTOPHER CAPOTIS
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Included with the g/flex are detailed instructions for repairing leaks in aluminum boats, as well as other types of repairs.

Answered on 10/13/2011 by JOHN SUMBERG

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Thank you very Richard !! Larry !

Answered on 10/13/2011 by Larry Dubois

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I cannot answer your question because I use this product information when I build large scale RC Airplanes. I can only tell you that there is no better product for use on stress points like landing gear construction, fire wall etc. Dick Smith

Answered on 10/13/2011 by RICHARD SMITH

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Hi Larry, I have been working with g/flex for some time now and I have found it to be excellent for many things. I was very surprised how well it adheres to metal. If you will follow the instructions that come with the G/flex and do a thorough job of prepping you can expect very good results. when you measure the amout (assuming you have purcahsed the unthickened,which in this case is necessary) the hardener is much less viscuose than the resin. it is hard to measure accurately, having a tendency to use too much resin. I let the bottles sit for a minute or two to see if the levels are the same. Usually you need to put in a drop or two more hardener. I then mix well for a good two minutes. it is the consistency of honey but does have good flow. Just follow the instructions to the tee and yes I would add 420 aluminum powder and mix in 406 coloidal silica but no thicker than catsup for good flow into larger gaps. I also have found that it is better to work slowly and mix small batches at a time rather than mix a large batch and try to get it all done quickly. That way you will not miss a leak and if you do find one later you only need mark and fix. I think you have fixed your leaks and good luck to you Leslie

Answered on 10/27/2011 by Leslie Bell
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