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Epifanes Rapidcoat and Rapidclear Varnishes
$45.50In Stock
Epifanes Rapid Coat Varnish
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Epifanes Rapidcoat and Rapidclear Varnishes Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 14 Questions

Question

Can I apply this product over old varnish that has been sanded or can it be applied over an epoxy coating?

Asked on 05/02/2012 by jeff thompson

Top Answer

Jeff, I applied over old varnish after sanding and had no issues with it. It held up well. Never tried it over epoxy??? Hope this helps. Jerry

Answered on 05/03/2012 by JERRY WOOD
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We used the product on wood we had sanded down to fresh wood. However, we have heard from others that it can be used on previously cetoled or varnished (or epoxied) surfaces provided they are fully cured and have been sanded to provide a sufficient bite. We liked the product and, like Cetol, it can be re-coated without sanding provided one works within the allotted time frame.

Answered on 05/02/2012 by CHARLES GRAHAM

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Yes you can go over old varnish. Just make sure all loose material is removed and surface has a good key. Re coat time is minimal and no sanding between coats as long as it is applied with in 24 hours

Answered on 05/02/2012 by TOM ZETMAIER

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Karen, Don't do it. In the course of restoring my sailboat I encased all of my wood in epoxy prior to varnishing. Because this is a working sailboat, not a museum piece, there are plenty of times when something hard comes into contact with the brightwork. Because the epoxy is hard and brittle the wood underneath gives way, the coating chips and water gets in causing a stain unless you immediatly sand and revarnish. That's pretty impossible if you have 2 layers of epoxy and 10 of varnish. I wasted all of the time and material used in epoxy coating in addition to creating a bit of a nightmare that I have to deal with now. I repeat, do not coat with epoxy and then varnish, I've talked to a number of people in my shoes and we all regret it.

Answered on 05/29/2012 by jeff thompson

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Hi Jeff, I used it on new wood, so can't say for sure about covering old varnish, but in general you cannot do that with any varnish; you have to sand or scrape down to bare wood. As for epoxy, I'd never heard of that, but here's what I read today: " a trick to enhance durability of an exterior wood finish..boat builders have been using it for decades..apply an epoxy coating prior to applying a topcoat of varnish...you'll need to get a product designated as an epoxy coating rather than one that's specifically an adhesive...WEST SYSTEM is one good example. Use as directed, then apply the topcoat." I want to try this myself! It's on page 47 of the newest "Woodsmith" magazine, #201.

Answered on 05/18/2012 by KAREN CRANSTON

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Ive had success applying Rapid Clear to either of those surfaces. Just be sure to clean everything well with alcohol or other cleaner... and allow time for it that dry/evaporate.

Answered on 05/02/2012 by BEN ERIKSEN

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I haven't applied it over old varnish that has been sanded, but you should be able to. I have applied to over Smith's epoxy with good results.

Answered on 05/02/2012 by DAVID FRASE

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I add coats of Rapid Coat to my boat each year. I just lightly sand the wood and apply two or three coats of Rapid Coat, without sanding between coats. The Rapid Coat adheres well to the lightly sanded previous year's coats.

Answered on 05/02/2012 by LLOYD FLANAGAN

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My application was bare wood and used this to build up coats, but it should be fine over previous coats that are in good condition.

Answered on 05/02/2012 by CLAYTON HENKE

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Hi Jeff, I applied Rapid Clear over an original coat of two part polyurethane varnish on mahogany. (The two part product was a mistake I will never make again.) The Rapid Clear adheres like a champ to the coating. Do not expect the Rapid Clear to hide any imperfections in the old varnish. In those spots where I have sanded down the bright work to the bare wood, I love the look and ease of the Rapid Clear. Someday I will have the time and energy to finish all my mahogany that way. Until then, the Rapid Clear over the old varnish is more than good enough for protection from UV and for appearance. I can't speak to Rapid Clear over epoxy but I don't see why not. Again, the imperfections will still be there. Good luck, man. Roy

Answered on 05/02/2012 by ROY N. ROGERS
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Question

Hi, my wooden kayak received numerous deep scars doing battle with the 'canadian shield'. Any recommendations for a varnish that would hold up better in the next skirmish? thx

Asked on 09/23/2011 by bill berger

Top Answer

I use Rapd Clear and Rapid Coat as base layers on bare wood for my 34-ft sailboat. Usually two coats of Rapid Clear followed by two coats of Rapid Coat, followed by six coats of Epifanes Gloss clear. This combinatin has held up better than anything else I have tried over the last 11 years, especially on the difficult to maintain toe rail.

Answered on 09/24/2011 by THOMAS DWYER
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Hi Bill: I used Epifanes Clear Varnish (High Gloss) on my front door and garage doors to get the best UV and weather protection available. I live in the Midwest where our season change from very cold to very hot. From what I can tell, this finish is very durable and top notch. Not sure if it fights off Canadian shield, but worth a try based upon my results. Have a nice weekend. Hope this helps.

Answered on 09/23/2011 by KATHRYN EDDY

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I dislike rapidcoat it sags uncontrollably on vertical surfaces and the pigment obscures the grain. Its useful if you want to even out light and dark patches like a repair. It may perform better when sprayed. The coating seems soft and easily damaged. I am a fan interlux schooner varnish or if you want to strip your old varnish pack to the epoxy i would suggest the 2 part polyurethanes like perfection.

Answered on 09/23/2011 by BRETT PRICE

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These aren't really Epifanes toughest outdoor product. Their Clear Varnish is pretty tough but I think I would spend the $$$ and get their 2 part exterior polyurethane varnish EPF-PPX2000 - it is just going to be a whole lot tougher and top coat with the recommended varnish for max UV protection as well. This will have the impact resistance you're seeking. The best things are expensive but only up front. Cheap stuff just keeps costing more and more and more. Patrick

Answered on 09/23/2011 by PATRICK MCNAMARA

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Deep scars -- sounds like you went through the finish into the wood. If so, I would sand down to the wood around them (not a large area, maybe 1/2" wide) and fill with epoxy. Then lightly sand the rest of the hull and finish with Epifanes. The epoxy is tougher than varnish, but you need the varnish for UV protection. If you want a tougher overall coat, before the varnish, sand the existing varnish off the whole hull and coat with additional epoxy. The downside to more layers is weight, but it will make it tougher.

Answered on 09/23/2011 by WILLIAM MANION

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Bill, We have used this product for exterior door finish primarily for sun protection as we are located in west Texas. We have no water therefore no experience with kayaks.

Answered on 09/23/2011 by DAVID GRIFFIN

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Epifanes coatings are easy to apply and get a good build-up quickly. They provide a very durable coating which won't eliminate "battle scars" but certainly minimize the effect and will accept touchup readily. Sailript

Answered on 09/23/2011 by PAUL TITZMANN
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Question

could this be used on a douglas fir ceiling in an enclosed shower?

Asked on 08/01/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have had Epifanes Rapid Clear on my mahogany porch for maybe six years and raiwater/snow melt puddles there for days, sometimes as long as a week, and the varnish is a month or more under ice and snow. I add a fresh brushed coat every two years after just cleaning with paper towels and soap & water. No delaminations.

Answered on 08/01/2014 by ROBERT LODGE
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I USE THIS PRODUCT FOR EXTERIOR DOORS ONLY. IT SHOULD WORK FOR YOUR APPLICATION AS LONG AS YOU DON'T HAVE CONSTANT WATER ON THE AREA. IT HAS HELD UP VERY WELL FOR ME. I USE 7 COATS OF RAPID CLEAR ON THE DOORS AND HAVE NOT HAD ANY PRODUCT FAILURE YET.

Answered on 08/01/2014 by TODD DAVIS

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Based on my experience with Rapid Clear, I would not recommend it for a high humidity area. I used it as a base coat on some exterior brightwork and then did a few top coats with Epifanes High Gloss. 2 years later it all lifted and I'm having to redo everything that I used Rapid Clear on.

Answered on 08/01/2014 by Jeanne Rynne

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Yes, I have it on my Doug Fir front door, it looks great. No problem with water exposure, I also use it on my boat. For it to really look great you will want at least 5 coats.

Answered on 08/02/2014 by JAMES STROHACKER

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I don't know if this would work in an enclosed shower. I bought this item to apply to outdoor patio furniture. It has not held up as well as I thought it would.

Answered on 08/01/2014 by CHAROLETT BROWN

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Rapid coat is darker than the clear. Should work fine But use lots of coats for best long term result.

Answered on 08/01/2014 by ROBERT YOUNG
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Question

can it be used over a painted wood surface to protect paint finish for outside?

Asked on 09/19/2014 by Jim Kenyi

Top Answer

I have only used this finish over stained wood. I don't know how it would do over paint.

Answered on 09/20/2014 by CHAROLETT BROWN
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Do not know. Have always used it over bare sealed wood. It depends on adhesion to the paint; probably should sand paint lightly Good luck

Answered on 09/21/2014 by WILLIAM MACKEY

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Not sure, but probably if you sand the surface a little first. I used it on an exterior mahogany door I made. It worked well but that was applied to raw wood, not a painted surface. I applied 7 coats by brush with light sanding between, following thinning instructions on the can. I hope this helps. BTW, the door resides in Wyoming at 5,000 feet elevation. It gets plenty of abuse by the elements, especially punishing wind and sun.

Answered on 09/19/2014 by FRANKLIN ORTH

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Varnish over paint would not be my choice for any kind of exterior protection. Better to add one or two coats of the same paint paint, with careful caulking of each crack that you see and primer over the caulk when it cures. Varnish over paint not only bonds two dissimilar materials that have different elongations when heated by the sun, but it may have problems of adhesion if the paint is acrylic. If the paint is oil, full samding and cleaning is needed prior to adding a coat of Epifanes. Even then, the improvement in appearance would be short lived unless Epifanes if re-coated on schedule. If the substrate is historical or with special decorative colors, and if the location is not in direct sun, Epiranes might greatly improve the appearance. I have seen it used for commercial decorative facades where it is attractive when kept up.

Answered on 09/19/2014 by WILL W BULLOCK

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I have never tried that and do not know if it would work.

Answered on 09/19/2014 by JANIE WRIGHT
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Question

does this product come in less than a quart can? I prefer small cans as I am only doing a toe rail?

Asked on 02/26/2014 by Colleen Wagner

Top Answer

I have used it on a restoration and have only seen it in quarts. It is a bit difficult to apply but does a nice job.

Answered on 02/27/2014 by THOMAS ADAMSON
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It also comes in 250ml & 500 ml sizes.

Answered on 02/27/2014 by David Lichtenstein

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The smallest I've seen is 750 ml., about 25 ounces, same as a wine bottle.

Answered on 02/26/2014 by WAYNE BEARDSLEY

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As Janie stated, it comes in 750ml cans which is about 25.4 ounces (compared to a quart which is 32 ounces)...

Answered on 07/29/2014 by 2003z1000 .

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The Epifanes Rapid Coat and Clear Varnish only comes in 750 ml. cans which is about 12 oz ( quart is 16 oz).... nothing smaller is available that I am aware of.

Answered on 02/27/2014 by JANIE WRIGHT
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Question

I applied Rapid Coat but am finding that it is not drying out completely in leaas than 48 hours. I am coating in my basement where the temperature is about 68. The only thing I can think of is that I thinned the first coat and maybe should not have. After waiting 24 hours I applied a second coat even though the first was still slightly tacky because the instructions said to recoat in 4-5 hours and I thought without stating that it had to be thoroughly dry. Has anyone else had this problem and if so, what was the fix?

Asked on 05/27/2012 by Graham Stewart

Top Answer

Basement might not have ventilation. What was the thinner? I have never added thinner. For every application, Epifanes dries very well, but that was outside, exterior.

Answered on 05/30/2012 by WILL W BULLOCK
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I used it to seal and finish an exterior door. But I was hyper-vigilant to apply it horizontally, on a dry day, with enough breeze to wick it dry. When I note that you are coating in your basement, I think of my basement - a damp cold place even on the hottest days. This stuff would not dry in my basement. Perhaps too much humidity down in yours? And, sorry to say, but I fear that the reapply while still too tacky could be problematic. Mark L

Answered on 05/31/2012 by MARK LIPTON

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Thanks for your reply. I am disappointed - particularly with Rapid Clear. It seems to streak with what looks like dry areas. I have tried loading up the brush and apply a heavy coat but I still get these dry streaks. Rapid Coat seems to be better. Both take much longer to dry than the 3-4 hours advertised. I am doing the work in my basement in a heated bedroom kept at 80 degrees but it still takes 24 hours to dry whether thinned or not - defeating the whole advantage of this product in the first place. If it takes 24 hours to dry I might as well go back to regular varnish.

Answered on 05/31/2012 by Graham Stewart

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My best guess is that the first coat did not dry in the time predicted due to humidity in the basement and lack of air movement . . . I always use Epifanes varnish on warm, dry days with fans gently moving the air around. I would agree that the first coat should be completely dry before second coat is applied.

Answered on 05/29/2012 by JANIE WRIGHT

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Graham, The rapidcoat is very tough to work with. I've had problems with runs, drying is the stated time,and you need to clean the brush consistently to get an even coat. I have not been very happy with it. I don't recommend thinning it. It seems to be abnormally affected by humidity, maybe put a de-humidifier in the basement. T.D.

Answered on 05/30/2012 by THOMAS ADAMSON
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Question

Do you sand before first Rapid clear coat?

Asked on 05/23/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I sand before the first coat of rapid clear. If there is a previous finish that is in good condition and nicely flat, i just lightly scuff it to remove the gloss. Epifanes recommends degreasing the surface as well.

Answered on 05/24/2016 by ANDREW SCOTT
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I sand wood to 150 grit, followed by de-whiskering with 320 stearate paper and 3M Scotch brite abrasive pads,followed by stain,if used, then build up as many coats of Rapid Coat or Rapid Clear as needed to fill the (pores) grain of the wood. Sometimes,it works well,and sometimes I mess it up with impatience.

Answered on 05/23/2016 by ANTHONY BRICK

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yes sand before first lightly say 800 grit and then between subsequent coats

Answered on 05/23/2016 by CHARLES HONSINGER

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YES ! Wipe with denatured alcohol after sanding then use a tack cloth

Answered on 05/23/2016 by RICHARD PIATT
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Question

Can I buy the rapid clear in a spray can as I want to spray a wicker table and chairs which will be on my lanai in Florida? thank you , marianne

Asked on 10/30/2013 by marianne merrow

Top Answer

Thank you, Wayne Do you think it will work on Wicker by brushing it? Marianne

Answered on 10/30/2013 by marianne merrow
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It does not come in a spray can but it can be sprayed using the Pre-val sprayers that are sold here.

Answered on 10/30/2013 by PAUL TITZMANN

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I have never seen it sold in a spray can but you could make your own using something called a PreVal sprayer kit. They are available at Home Depot and elsewhere: Search on Google. I think you would need to thin the varnish quite a bit to spray it successfully, and I'd practice on something else first.

Answered on 10/30/2013 by WAYNE BEARDSLEY
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Question

can it be applied over another varnish?

Asked on 05/10/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

compatibility questions are tough. I sanded whatever the previous varnish was and applied the Epifanes and it worked fine for my preserve but not perfection standards. good product.

Answered on 06/07/2013 by PAUL PEZZUTTI
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Sorry, I have not tried that and do not know the answer to your question.

Answered on 06/07/2013 by JANIE WRIGHT

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I don't know for sure as I am using it on exterior teak which will first be stripped but I see no reason that it won't work over another varnish. The advantage of the Epifanes is that you don't have to sand between coats and therefore can do up to 3 coats per day. Google Epifanes and call them directly at their US distributor in Maine.

Answered on 06/07/2013 by PETER BENNETT
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Question

I am making wood top table for outdoors in Houston (humid and rainy). Going to sand and distress raw wood and stain a color. Then I'm looking to use an Epifanes product to seal with a very thick clear coat. Is it best to use both Rapid Coat and Rapid Clear Varnish or only the varnish? And how many coats of one or both?

Asked on 01/18/2015 by Alex K

Top Answer

Rapid coat has a fairly dark tint, so it is good if you want to match another piece for color or just darken a light wood, then top coat with several coats of Rapid Clear. You can adjust the tint by using more or less coats of Rapid Coat. If the wood is the color you want already, just use Rapid clear. This product is great for outdoors as it will not blister if applied correctly, but it will need a fresh top coat or two every year or two; this is easy though, no sanding is required - ever, unless you want a super finish. But then it is a semi gloss anyway, or maybe a bit glossier than semi. I like it for my sailboat's exterior teak.

Answered on 01/19/2015 by TERENCE MASON
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I've not had good luck with the "rapid" products for exterior use. It Blew out 2 years after application. I would use the high gloss varnish only and do 7 coats minimum.

Answered on 01/18/2015 by Jeanne Rynne
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