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TotalBoat TotalFair Epoxy Fairing Compound
$36.99In Stock
TotalBoat TotalFair Epoxy Fairing Compound
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TotalBoat TotalFair Epoxy Fairing Compound Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 58 Questions

Question

after doing fiberglass repair does repair need to be primed before fairing with total boat its over epoxy resin after blush is removed? Glenn

Asked on 06/01/2015 by glenn horton

Top Answer

I was very happy with total fair. I had used bondo, (not too good!) prior. I used total fair both under and over plywood that had been seal coated with epoxy mix ( no cloth) It seems a little tough to sand once it has really hardened so I recommend sanding ASAP.

Answered on 06/03/2015 by BRUCE WILDER
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We are building a 15' cat boat with cedar strips. the hull had 6 oz. fiberglass cloth with two coats of epoxy resin. We needed to use fairing compound on certain areas of the hull. We sanded down the entire hull after the epoxy coatings and the cleaned with denatured alcohol. We then applied the fairing compound to the surface of the hull, let cure and then sanded down. I suggest making several lifts when there are deep areas to fill. If you are doing large areas of a hull, I would strongly suggest looking at the Flexicat tools. Hope this helps

Answered on 06/01/2015 by Tom Petro

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No fiberglass doesn't need to be primed first, and correct sand with 80 grit paper to remove blush, then apply Total Fair

Answered on 06/01/2015 by THOMAS SWIFT

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Nope, just remove blush and give it a light hand sanding.

Answered on 06/02/2015 by RANDOLPH HEMSATH

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Glenn, You are good to go. The fairing putty will adhere very well with the prep you have done.

Answered on 06/01/2015 by ALAN HILLS

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To the best of my recollection, the product info does not state that fiberglas repairs should be primed before fairing. I did not, and had no issues with adhesion over fiberglas repairs or old gelcoat that had been heavily sanded.

Answered on 06/02/2015 by KENNETH GAW

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I used total fair on a wood boat. I did prime before I used the fairing product. Turned out great.

Answered on 06/01/2015 by RICHARD SMITH

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I used the fairing over a deck fiberglass repair after roughing the epoxy and no primer. The repair is six months old and still looks great.

Answered on 06/02/2015 by WALT AVERY
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Question

Can this be used on fiberglass dune buggy body that has many cracks in the gel coat

Asked on 05/27/2018 by Shorty the buggy man from undisclosed

Top Answer

This product works great as a fairing material, but you can not gelcoat directly onto this product. All gelcoat cracks would need to be ground out to a V shape by a tool such as a dremmel. If you wanted to gelcoat over this product, you would need to coat it with TotalBoat 2-Part Epoxy Primer or TotalProtect

Answered on 06/18/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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It depends on the depth of the cracks. Widen the crack, removing any loose material with an awl or can opener. If 2 mm or less deep, then yes this product might do the trick. Clean with solvent, sand and fill. If deeper than that, then the cracks are probably structural and you will need some cloth too.

Answered on 05/27/2018 by kjweinstein

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Don't know. I used on wood boat with good results.

Answered on 05/27/2018 by johnnyb.goldb

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The short a answer is yes. BUT if you're planning to add new gelcoat over it then NO. It's complicated. This epoxy will bond to gelcoat but gelcoat will not bond to it. I learned this the hard way. You have to use Formula 27 epoxy if you wish to cover the repair with new gelcoat. Read the Total Boat gelcoat repair info on their website and watch their videos. YouTube also has many gelcoat repair clips. Good luck. Linda

Answered on 05/27/2018 by lfsnell

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Fairing can fill the cracks but you will still need to redo the gell coat

Answered on 05/27/2018 by hcaffee

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I don't know. This is a good product I would give it a try.

Answered on 05/28/2018 by georgewrr
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Question

can this go over epoxy resin?

Asked on 11/23/2016 by carl b

Top Answer

I used it over TotalBoat TotalProtect Epoxy Barrier Coat System. I found it to adhere well as long as you follow the directions and follow the re-coating times. I had a very good experience with totalfair.

Answered on 11/23/2016 by STEFAN GOLICZ
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Shouldn't be a problem as long as you get rid of any amine blush (waxy film)left from the curing epoxy resin.

Answered on 11/23/2016 by JAMES BRYAN

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Who's epoxy resin? I use total boat resin and this works fantastic! I am using all these products right now on a corvette project because I believe in the results I have experienced! Any questions contact me @ tmfallon at Derrick dot com

Answered on 11/25/2016 by THOMAS FALLON

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Yes, I used it over Epoxy and it worked well. Very good and easy to use. I liked it better than quick fair.

Answered on 11/23/2016 by KEITH EVANS

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Yes with good results.

Answered on 11/24/2016 by noemar noemar

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Yes - applied JD Total Fair over West epoxy at aft base of keel summer 2016 - boat came out of the water this fall looking like there was never any repair! This is a great product! Easy to mix, use and sand - just be sure to close caps tightly after use C Adams, Madison, CT

Answered on 11/23/2016 by CHIP ADAMS
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Question

Can you thin this slightly before applying? It is very thick and difficult to get a thin layer in cold temperatures. Other then that, it is the best filler I have used.

Asked on 03/17/2015 by Marc Nugent

Top Answer

you could thin it perhaps with a more liquid version of epoxy like west system or the equivelant total boat project but any thinner than what you have it will sag in any application than horizontal. I would suggest warming it up aand keeping it warm right up until application. But keeping it warm will shorten its working time. 10 degree increase in temp shortens working time by 1/2 with most epoxies. Hope this helps

Answered on 03/17/2015 by PETER CLARKE
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I have not tried to thin it, but you might want to try pre warming it in a warm place before mixing.

Answered on 03/17/2015 by Fredrick Newman

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Would not advice thinning it, would warm it first.

Answered on 03/18/2015 by MIKE NEWMAN

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I also found the Total Fair to be very thick and hard to mix and spread thinly when it is cold. My solution was to get it good and warm before mixing. I would set the tubs in front of a portable heater or a 500W work light and let it get warm before trying to mix it. It becomes much easier to work when it is warm. The heat does reduce the pot life somewhat though.

Answered on 03/17/2015 by DAVID WOOD

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I had the same issue. I warmed both parts with a heater before I mixed them and it became much easier to work with.

Answered on 03/17/2015 by MICHAEL FOSTER
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Question

ok.... sorry if this is redundant...... I filled this out and sent it earlier but appeared to not go anywhere.... when I hit the send button.... so.... last year I purchased this product (1qt) and faired out a part of the command bridge and the produce did a super job.... this year I want to fair out the fiberglass area's of the salon cabin and mixed up a small portion to fair a area at the rear starboard side..... while mixing I noticed the the Part A (yellow) portion did not mix all the way and left bits of yellow in the mixture.... no matter how long I mixed..... is there a way to get the yellow to a more solvent position again? I stored this product in a dry place with the lids securely in place.... so am a bit confused as to what cause's this....? Thanks bl

Asked on 07/01/2018 by bl from Portland, Ore

Top Answer

This can happen, one trick that some customers do is to put a piece of plastic wrap or poly sheeting before applying the lid and storing for a longer period of time, but it also seems like you have some crystallization. If you put the yellow tub in a hot water bath (don't submerge it over the lid) and get all of the product up to 140 degrees or so for 1-2 hours and stir occasionally it should return to the original form.

Answered on 07/02/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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No idea.

Answered on 07/01/2018 by thomas3452

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It does form a skin as it gets older in the container. Just skim the thin layer of dried off and go for it! It'll be good as new

Answered on 07/02/2018 by corsairmike

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Well I don't know but I think you have to buy a fresh one I used mine for my project and have no issues

Answered on 07/04/2018 by cedcharneco
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We are planning on using Total Boat Fairing on our sailboat hull. Will there be any problems using it on a lead keel, old gelcoat and new epoxy repairs? ( West System ) Also, we are hoping to finish the faring job before we head north for the summer. The boat will be in Green Cove Springs, Florida for 6 months before we return. At that time we want to put on a proper epoxy barrier coat(s) followed by ant-fouling paint. Will that be a problemfor us? Will there be anything in particular that will have to be done to the faired areas when we return? Any other concerns or suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks kindly, Jim

Asked on 04/04/2018 by 4foot from Green Cove Springs, Florida.

Top Answer

Hi Jim, you want to grind the lead bare and INSTANTLY coat with an unthickened epoxy or barrier coat to seal the lead and prevent it from oxidizing. Then you can fair the material with TotalFair. This product works great on gelcoat and previously cured epoxy, but the amine blush must be removed from the West Systems before applying TotalFair. Barrier coat will adhere wonderfully to cured and sanded TotalFair. Also if you were hoping to use gelcoat over this product for cosmetic repairs above the waterline, gelcoat will not cure directly over TotalFair, so you must use an epoxy surfacing primer or barrier coat first.

Answered on 06/01/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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I have used it on the hull of my 1983 Cape Dory for fairing the through hull fittings as well as over repairs. It is very easy to work wit and is holding up very well. Just be sure to mix completely which is easy due to the color change that occurs when the two colors are mixed.. I have always covered the faired areas with antifouling paint after completing the application.

Answered on 04/05/2018 by kmagill

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Jim, I have used this product on many occasions above and below the waterline on lead keels and gelcote, as well as new construction with epoxy.  As in any application, surface preparation is the key to success.  You must sand and clean every surface well in order to provide a good bond.  It is better to build up several thinner layers if you have deep imperfections.  I refer you to this link from the Jamestown site for guidance.  https://doc.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/pdfs/TotalBoat/TotalBoat_TotalFair_TDB.pdf Of course, above the waterline you will want to apply a primer coat over the faired repair before the final finish coat, just as you would any paint job.  As far as applying a barrier coat at a future date, simply give the entire surface a good sanding and wipe-down and proceed according to the instructions on the particular barrier coat you choose. It's not really that scary, and when you're done you can come and fair my keel.             Be well, Randy

Answered on 04/05/2018 by randy

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Is exactly what I used it for. Held up perfect after a year. You will have to sand lightly to blend it in with the keel. Frank Z    

Answered on 04/28/2018 by dell4661
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Question

Will it work on molder fuel tanks. Plastic?

Asked on 08/03/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Plastic fuel tanks are Polyethylene (a specific type of plastic), and just bout nothing sticks to it.

Answered on 08/09/2016 by NED LLOYD
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NO! Epoxies don't bond to most plastics. There are some plastic repair products on the market, but I would not use them on fuel tanks. Otherwise for the right application this is a great product, and very easy to work with

Answered on 08/05/2016 by RANDOLPH HEMSATH

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No. No epoxy will stick to plastic.

Answered on 08/03/2016 by JOHN WILSON

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I would not try it on that kind of plastic

Answered on 08/03/2016 by Fredrick Newman
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I have removed the teak deck from my fly-bridge. I have found that someone filled in with bond a section that is about 3 feet wide, 10 feet long, and about 1 inch deep. I have glassed this over but need to know if I should use the TotalFair to fill in and shape to the original crown or should I use more epoxy?

Asked on 02/06/2016 by Mike Chaplin

Top Answer

I used Total Fair to finish out the crown in front of my hatch cover and it was fine. I suppose it would depend on how much fill you need to make the crown. If it is extensive, I would probably go with epoxy.

Answered on 02/07/2016 by WALT AVERY
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Mike, I think it depends on how high you have to build up the surface...a large area like that will also be more prone to cracking so I personally would go with an epoxy mix there. I have used the Totalfair for fairing much smaller areas with excellent results but never on an area that large and never more than 1/8th inch. You are smart to lose the teak! Maybe someone has used Totalfair on a large area and can offer some input. Alan

Answered on 02/06/2016 by ALAN HILLS

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Frederick, Thanks for the info. I think I am going to look into the 5:1 epoxy to build up the deck in the low spots. I have some biaxial cloth left and will use that for strength on the deck.

Answered on 02/07/2016 by Mike Chaplin

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I have used the product with success filling small cavities. 1/8" or less. I would build the crown for drainage with slow cure epoxy, and laters of cloth myself. Take care Ted

Answered on 02/07/2016 by FREDERICK MELVIN
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Question

can this be used to repair pits in an outdrive after sand blasting before paint?

Asked on 09/26/2015 by stan theman

Top Answer

I'm sorry, although I did buy it I have as yet not even opened it. However, unless the pits are unusually coarse, I would expect that a coat or coats of a good primer would better serve the purpose.

Answered on 09/26/2015 by JERRY HALL
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I am not sure.

Answered on 09/27/2015 by Gary L. Sr. Last Name

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I dont know. its great on glass and epoxy. I would think west system with aluminum powder mix, that they sell would work for cosmetic repair only.

Answered on 09/27/2015 by LAURENCE SALKIN

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This product is just like automotive body filler (ie:Bondo). As long as the area is properly prepped, it will adhere to almost anything. It is easy to sand and takes on paint real well.

Answered on 09/26/2015 by JEAN-PIERRE PLANTE
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Question

I have scraped away some "bad wood" in the bottom of my marine grade plywood boat. Also scraped a lot of old paint and will eventually repaint the whole interior after coating the bare plywood with total boat epoxy resin. Should I fill the voids with total boat fairing (surfacing putty) before I coat with epoxy resin or use the epoxy resin first and then fill in voids with the fairing compound?

Asked on 06/13/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have a similar problem on my deck filled with polyester resin sanded smooth then painted the deck with nonskid I used the fairing to fill in wherei had patches of peeling painting in the hull if that helps

Answered on 06/13/2015 by THOMAS SEMMENS
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Suggest filling first with standard 2 part epoxy resin and then fill in voids with fairing compound.. saturate exposed plywood with thin epoxy to get pent ration into wood for protection.

Answered on 06/13/2015 by DANIEL SINGER

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I would coat the area first with epoxy as to seal the substrate. Wipe with actetone, lightly scuff,wipe again, and then smooth with Total Fair. I have used alot of fairing products, but by far Total Fair is the best I've used.

Answered on 06/14/2015 by ERIN PINKERTON

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I would the plywood with epoxy resin first, then fill voids with total boat fairing for strength.

Answered on 06/13/2015 by HENRY J BAUMAN JR
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