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Antiquax Original Wax Polish
$15.44In Stock
Antiquax Original Wax Polish
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Antiquax Original Wax Polish Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 11 Questions

Question

I used Antiquax on the top of a chest of drawers. The finish bubbled. Any idea why? Are there finishes that this product should not be used on?

Asked on 10/06/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Just a guess, but most wax products will not adhere to a wet surface. Water or another substance could cause it to bubble, even in very small quantities. The Antiquax could also have been contaminated.

Answered on 10/07/2011 by THOMAS REDD
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I have been refinishing antiques for a long time and I know of no reason that wax would make a finish bubble. This has never happened in my experience. Was the finish dry and cured completely? Need more information in order to help. Kenneth Place

Answered on 10/07/2011 by KENNETH PLACE

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We have used Antiquax for years on both solid wood furniture (pine/mahogany) as well as veneered pieces and Antiquax has been consistently perfect. Applied thinly and worked in with elbow grease I am confident the problem you have relates to some other cause, moisture (or lack of it in the case of veneers) or similar.

Answered on 10/07/2011 by PAUL HIRTLE

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It had to be the fault of the finish itself....Wax shouldn't bubble for any reason.

Answered on 10/17/2011 by EDD SHOTTS

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antiquax wax DID NOT make the finish bubble. trust me on this.

Answered on 10/07/2011 by AARON ALDERMAN

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I have used Antiquax on a variety of finishes from lacquer,varnish and deft and have never experienced any type of bubbling. Generally,the only bubbling I've ever experienced was when I didn't clean a surface of the varnish/painter remover I used in refinishing a piece of furniture. I doubt that the Antiquax was the issue but some type of residue left on the surface.

Answered on 10/07/2011 by JAMES CORBETT
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Question

What is the brown wax..is it one that includes stain?

Asked on 12/09/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes. There are various shades of wax each with a coloring agent to help match the wood you plan to wax. You can also use the neutral color and add your own stain, such as Tints All, and create your own colored wax.

Answered on 12/09/2015 by LORENZO ZIPETO
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No, it has no stain. It is just an old fashioned polishing wax - excellent for wood, furniture and also for maintaining and polishing mechanical shop equipment.

Answered on 12/10/2015 by RAOUL CIESZKOWSKI

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Antiquax does not include a stain. I have used it on my antique mahogany, walnut and yew wood furniture for 40 years without a change in color of the wood.

Answered on 12/10/2015 by JOHN CARONNA

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I would call it a light brown pigment in the wax. If the surface of the item is sealed with finish, there will be no "staining" of the wood. Unlike some other highly colored waxes, the Antiquax brown doesn't stain your hands when applied. So, there is a colorant in the wax, but I wouldn't call it a stain. Hope this helps.

Answered on 12/09/2015 by CHARLES PHILLIPS

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For practical purposes, the important thing is that brown polish an be used to lend in light areas or to achieve a warmer colored patina.

Answered on 12/09/2015 by OSBORNE H. GREEN
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Question

Does the Antiquax polish wax have a strong odor to it? Does it need to be used in a well ventilated room, or is it considered low odor.

Asked on 05/20/2013 by Cheryl Dennis

Top Answer

Antiquax does not contain solvents as some waxes do. There is very little odor. It is the only wax we use in our custom furniture shop.

Answered on 09/21/2015 by LORENZO ZIPETO
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Thanks so much for your response. Good description, very helpful!

Answered on 05/22/2013 by Cheryl Dennis

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It has a low/mild odor. It does contain some petroleum distillates so some ventilation would be good.

Answered on 05/21/2013 by JOHN BROWN

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Antiquax wax does not have a strong order. I don't think anything about it will bother you, and it will be enormously helpful.

Answered on 05/20/2013 by NORA F. CROW

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Not really, mild at best. Actually has a sweet, nutmagy smell- pleasant and quite different than other paste waxes which have the toxic 'toluene' chemical in them. I use Antiquax and Liberon waxes primarily because they lack many of the harsh carsinagenic chemicals other brands have...

Answered on 05/21/2013 by THOMAS GREENE
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Question

Can Antiquax be used on painted furniture to seal & protect the finish?

Asked on 02/18/2013 by Gladys Wells

Top Answer

I would say yes without hesitation. Any application can be later removed with naptha -if need be. I have used it over the years on a wide variety of surfaces and have always been happy with the result.

Answered on 02/20/2013 by ROBERT KLEEMAN
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I haven't tried that! Let us know how it goes if you do try it.

Answered on 02/21/2013 by JOHN BROWN

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I am sorry I do not have the answer to your question. I have only used Antique Wax on non-painted wood antique furniture. I am very happy with the wax and have used it for years. It feeds the wood and gives it a great patina. Hope you find the answer to your questions. Mary Braga

Answered on 02/20/2013 by MARY BRAGA

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Indeed. There are no solvents present in the wax that should be harmful to modern paints.

Answered on 09/21/2015 by LORENZO ZIPETO

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I have an antique painted federal candle table that I plan to try it on. Always start in an inconspicuous location and to decide if you like the results before doing the most visible areas. -- Leo

Answered on 02/21/2013 by LEO MASCIANA
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Question

is antiquax good to use on bronze sculptures?

Asked on 10/14/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have used Antiquax on brass hardware but never bronze. It is my primary wax for wood as well as metals used in our shop. This includes hardware, cast aluminum and steel tools. I believe it to be a gentle, non-abrasive product which would probably be suitable for bronze. Another possibility may be Renaissance Wax which is a micro-crystalline and used on wood and metal. Antiquax has a green-gray color before it dries. It will not impart this color on your material.

Answered on 10/14/2011 by LORENZO ZIPETO
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I use it on antique furniture, as described. I once watched workers at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California, waxing a Henry Moore, but they used something else--with red on the label. Why not call your local museum? The scene I witnessed was outside, i'd suggest using nothing if your bronze is inside. Sorry I can't be of more help...Edith K

Answered on 10/14/2011 by EDITH KODMUR

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That depends on what you're trying to achieve. Bronze's patina increases slowly with age due to exposure to air. Using Antiquwax on a bronze piece will give it a soft lustre but will also slow down the oxidation process. I have used Antiquwax on a small bronze Mercury because the patina was as dark as I wanted it to be. By the way, this oxidation process is very slow. The secret with Antiqwax is that less is more. Whatever you apply it to, do so sparingly, let it dry completely and then buff with a soft, clean cloth. Applying too much will make it harder to remove the excess. My advice would be to use a Q-tip to apply a very small amount of the wax to an inconspicuous part of the bronze piece, let it dry and then buff it out to see if you will be happy with the results. I offer this advice with a caveat: I am not an expert on Antiquwax, just a long term satisfied user and accept no responsibility for the end results of my advice.

Answered on 10/14/2011 by WILLIAM FITZPATRICK

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The short answer is no. Depending on several other pieces of information, however, it may be reasonable to use Antiquax on a bronze sculpture. Given the current condition and the desired final effect on the bronze, most likely there are several other methods more appropriate for treating a bronze surface. Antiquax is primarily meant for wood. Even within wood, the surface must be porous. For example, applying Antiquax to a hard gloss wood surface, such as a highly polished synthetic or shellac, will leave areas with slightly thicker or thinner wax layer, that upon buffing will result in uneven reflectivity. In short, worsening the finish. While bronze sculpture is the ultimate result of casting the metal into a mold, which, in turn, has been made from, usually, a clay original, and the clay is porous, the final bronze cast does not contain the microscopic pores on the clay original. There are situations where a bronze sculpture has developed microscopic pits, most probably resulting from exposure to corrosives. For example a sculpture subjected to the environment in places where there is acid rain, or sea mist, etc. Antiquax applied to such surface will fill-in these holes, and upon buffing the surface, will restore the reflectance lost from the pitting. If one were to use Antiquax on a pitted bronze sculpture, make sure that during application, while the wax's solvent has not yet evaporated, there are no nooks-and-crannies, which are part of the sculpture itself as intended by the sculptor, that end up covered by a "blob" of Antiquax. If the sculpture does have that sort of detail, in those areas spread the thin coating of Antiquax with a soft brush (such as soft toothbrush). After letting the wax dry (solvent evaporation) for at least an hour, buff the surface first with a lint-free soft cloth, and then, for the nooks-and-crannies, use a soft brush (such as a soft brush for shoe shining). One redeeming quality of trying Antiquax on a bronze sculpture, and assuming the sculpture is of a reasonably small size, is that if one does not like the results, one can wash off the wax with hot water, probably around 175 degrees Fahrenheit (80 degrees Celsius). The above are just some ideas. By no means I would pretend to recommend anything specifically without knowing many more details than those provided by the very succinct question.

Answered on 10/14/2011 by MOISES EISENBERG
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Question

dD you have the dark wax/brown wax? Thank you very much for taking the time to answer this question. Nan Hawkes 901-246-9525

Asked on 09/24/2011 by nan hawkes

Top Answer

I first noticed Antiqwax at a shop selling fine English antiques in Bethesda, MD. Nothig else offers the natural protection for my antiques and fine furiture and is so easy to apply and hand polish. (Avoid spray waxes that ruin your finish by leaving an ugly streaked effect.) The dark brown has a little stain in it that will mask scratches in darker furniure like Mahogany and Walnut. I also like the lighter color since it can be used with light or dark woods. If you take the time to hand-polish your furniture with this wax it will be beautiful. I know of no nearby stores that still carry this product so I offset the shipping cost by orderig 2-3 cans. Leo

Answered on 09/26/2011 by LEO MASCIANA
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Hi, NO, I only have the natural clear color. Sorry.

Answered on 09/26/2011 by ANN HALE

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Dear Nan, A restorer of fine furniture recommended Antiquax to me a couple of years ago for use on my antiques and on my custom-made desk--items the luster of which any kind of commercial polish or oil would cloud and obscure. Since purchasing about a dozen cans from Jamestown Distributors, I have never looked back. The restorer himself had treasured and conserved the small amount of Antiquax he had left. He didn't know then where to obtain more. Luckily, I was able to direct him to Jamestown Distributors. Antiquax is, as my daughter would say, "awesome." N. F. C.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by NORA F. CROW

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I have bought the brown antiqwax from Jamestown distributors before. It is a great product. I re-ordered some recently but it came as a clear wax, still the antiqwax label. . I have not used it yet but hope that it will be the same product as the previous brown antiqwax. The brown was terrific.

Answered on 09/26/2011 by CLARISSA STREET
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Question

How long does it last after an application? Can you tell me how often it is necessary to apply another coat When using it?

Asked on 09/21/2015 by Virginia Bedwell

Top Answer

I have used Antiqwax for almost 50 years and regard it as the best wax polish. I apply a light coat and then polish it out with a flannel cloth. As soon as furniture is polished, the process can be repeated. Unless a piece is subject to wear, I find that treatment twice a year keeps up a good patina.

Answered on 09/21/2015 by OSBORNE H. GREEN
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Under normal, indoor use, we expect to refresh the wax about every six months. Antiquax leaves wood with a very silky feeling. When the wax needs to be re-applied, you will probably notice the wood feels dry to the touch. This is an excellent product and the only paste wax we use in our custom furniture shop.

Answered on 09/21/2015 by LORENZO ZIPETO

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Virginia, That is a good question, one which I really can't help much with. I am a furniture maker and each piece that leaves the shop has one to two coats of Antiquax, but I can't really tell you how long it lasts after it leaves the shop. I am sure it will depend on use, exposure to sunlight, how often it is cleaned, what is used to clean, etc. I believe the recommendation is to wax once every six months to one year, 'depending on use', or something like that. It is my wax of choice, if that helps any!

Answered on 09/21/2015 by CHARLES PHILLIPS
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Question

Would using Antiquax remove the white rings from my furniture?

Asked on 04/01/2013 by Pat LeBeauf

Top Answer

The removal of white rings depends on the type of finish. There are "white ring removers" that will work on a broad spectrum of clear finishes. Sometimes any mild abrasive will work, but the white rings are typically caused by moisture trapped beneath the finish. If the finish is shellac, then denatured alcohol would be appropriate to use, however, do so with caution, as the alcohol will soften the finish if over-applied. For lacquer finishes, a lacquer thinner may work.

Answered on 09/21/2015 by LORENZO ZIPETO
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I don't see how since white rings are cause by heat or moisture or both. This means the finish has been damaged, and perhaps pushed into the surface. However, if you browse "how to remove white rings from furniture", you will find some possible processes. As for Antiquax, I rub on a coat, let it dry and polish, just like polishing shoes; then repeat the process. The result creates a hard waxed surface that can be cleaned and re-polished several times without using additional wax. I believe the carnuba wax in Antiquax is what give it its hardness when dried and polished. The Antiquax coat repels cold water very nicely, but I think not heat because I am assuming heat will melt the hardened wax. Having tried several over the years, this is best I have ever used.

Answered on 04/04/2013 by DESMOND A MACRAE

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Denatured alcohol would probably work best.

Answered on 05/20/2013 by NORA F. CROW
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Question

can this wax be used on metal sufaces and how dark is the brown?

Asked on 04/14/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

We've never used Antiquax on metal in sixty years of use but I can see no reason why one should not, as there are no strange chemicals in the wax to affect the metal, it would simply coat the metal rather than shine it. The wax is a pale honey color and needs to be used sparingly and rubbed into wood such as mahogany heartily. It produces a soft glowing sheen rather than a hard gleaming polish and has a nice, gentle smell. Once upon a time we had beautiful wooden floors and my wife used to say that whenever she polished them with Antiquax guests would soon appear. (She had an electric polisher.) Widely used in England, not much in USA.

Answered on 04/15/2015 by RICHARD ROBINSON
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We have never used on metal surfaces. Only wood, which works wonderfully.

Answered on 04/15/2015 by KAY VECCHIARELLI
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Question

Is Antiquax for marble, too? Thank you!

Asked on 10/24/2013 by Alexa MacKinnon

Top Answer

Sorry I haven't used it on marble..

Answered on 10/25/2013 by JOHN BROWN
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I have never used Antiquax for marble. There is a separate Antiquax product for stone, slate and marble, which is said to both clean and wax these materials. Antiquax for wood is an excellent all-purpose paste wax which has no solvents, thus is safe for most finishes. I would expect the same quality from the Antiquax Marble product.

Answered on 10/24/2013 by LORENZO ZIPETO
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