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$16.41 In Stock
Fiberglass Woven Roving 24oz.
$16.41In Stock
Fiberglass Woven Roving
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Fiberglass Woven Roving 24oz. Customer Questions and Answers

4 of 4 Questions

Question

I'm repairing the gunwhales on my 38' powerboat. It had fiberglass encapsulated wood which I've removed as much as possible. I need to fill in the 3/4" void where the rotted wood was removed from. I am considering either Bondo hair filler or fiberglass roving. If I use the roving, I will need to force it in to the void (3-4" deep). I thought about saturating it, then rolling it and inserting it into the horizontal opening. What option do you believe is the better solution? If using the roving, will my method work? Thank you. Capt Ken

Asked on 03/25/2012 by ken kross

Top Answer

I found the fiberglass roving is plenty pliable once saturated for the use you described - I am a wooden boat guy so the sound of using Bondo instead is sure to dissapoint over time - the use of a full epoxy instead of a polyester would be my recommendation, Capt Chris

Answered on 03/26/2012 by CHRISTIAN WALTERS
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Answer

Appreciate your advice Christian...

Answered on 03/27/2012 by ken kross

Answer

Thanks for the advice Chris...

Answered on 03/27/2012 by ken kross

Answer

Sounds like it will work, but look into slower setting resins. You'll need time to work. The other thing is try to work vertical (if you can) so you can pour resin into the void to avoid air pockets. I had to turn an entire car body on it's side so that I could get the resin to "puddle". It is very hard to saturate that stuff unless you can pour the resin.

Answered on 03/26/2012 by CHRIS ROBERT
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Question

I am repairing an old Mastercraft. The balsa between the outer glass and inner glass has rotted. I have removed the rotten balsa. The stringers are solid. I plan multiple layers of this 24oz woven roving and 24oz Biaxle cloth. How many layers would you recomment to replace the balsa and inner glass layer? Will wet out with West System Epoxy.

Asked on 09/19/2012 by CHUCK FURSTENAU

Top Answer

Hard to tell Chuck, I used the Roven Woving for building a car body, four layers built up about 1/8" all I can tell you is that stuff is very strong even with a few voids in it. I am not familiar with boats.

Answered on 09/21/2012 by CHRIS ROBERT
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Chuck, I had the same issue with a sailboat floor, I recommend reconstructing with balsa core which is available from Jamestown dist, if you replace with fiberglass @ least two layers you are going to add considerable weight and cost vs the balsa wood, additionally I believe the balsa provides a dampening effect while the boat is in operation. My two cents. Best Regards,

Answered on 09/20/2012 by KEITH KRAUTER

Answer

Assuning the outer and inner layer of your fiberglass hull will be properly repaired/replaced, 1 layer of woven will have the strength of the balsa. But you may want to fill in the void left from the removed balsa with enough layers to flush the void out to original hull thickness.

Answered on 09/21/2012 by MICHAEL MAAS
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Question

How much resin does it take to saturate one square foot of 24 oz woven roving?

Asked on 01/20/2012 by Thomas Myers

Top Answer

I'd mix 6 oz. better allways have extra.

Answered on 01/20/2012 by CHRIS ROBERT
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Answer

I would say close to 4 oz. of resin.

Answered on 01/20/2012 by KELLY KOCHER
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Question

Is it possible to lay up multiple wet layers with epoxy without using fillers or will the course texture result in voids? How thick will one layer of this + one layer of mat get and how thick will two layers of this + a layer of mat be? I'm adding a core to the roof of a large clamshell travel trailer to stop it from sagging. No need to handle impact of foot traffic like the deck of a boat, but it shouldn't compress either.

Asked on 04/30/2020 by Michiel from Near Seattle

Top Answer

Fiberglass lamination is typically done using unthickened epoxy. You can layer up multiple sheets in one sitting. The amount of resin required will vary depending on the weight of the fiberglass.

Answered on 04/30/2020 by Paul
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