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King Starboard 1/2" Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 27 Questions

Question

How well do screws hold in starboard. And what kind of screws?

Asked on 02/03/2013 by carl Heinz

Top Answer

I was able to drill and tap with no problems of holding. I would think that wood screws would hold as well.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by LEON HOPKINS
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They will work fine I actually made an entry door for my boat with the starboard. Just make sure you use pilot holes before putting in the screws. The board can be worked just like work, just make sure you use the right blade for plastic, ( nothing special, very fine teeth but can be found everywhere.)

Answered on 02/04/2013 by BRIAN LOGAN

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Screws are about the only way to hold starboard in place unless you bolt it. Treat it just like wood.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by TERRY SEXSON

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Carl, starboard is great for replacing wood without requiring the maintenance. It is softer than wood but holds wood screws extremely firm. I love the stuff and use it in place of wood whenever I can.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by GREGORY BOURESSA

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Hi Carl H, I recently used Starboard for a couple of projects. I replaced a teak cockpit table and some teak instrument sun shades. I would say that the Starboard does not offer any holding on its own. The manufacture says to drill oversize holes for screws allowing for expansion and contraction. For my projects, I made sure the screws were anchored into a solid backing substance. Securing the screw was either wood or resin. The claim on this stuff is you can use regular wood working tools. This is true. However, it does not flake apart like wood. For example, when drilling a hole you are not left with dust as you are with wood. Instead, the drill bit cuts (or shaves) the plastic and you have something resembling a long curly fry. In a marine environment, I would l only use stainless steel or brass screws. In a non-marine environment, I think you could use drywall screws. The drywall screws will offer the most holding but you need to be sure to not over tighten them. They will also not countersink on their own. Your will need to drill a small pilot hole and use a countersink tool prior to inserting the screw. Each hole can only be used one time as the starboard becomes threaded. Hope this helps.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by MARK ERDOS

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we have drilled and tapped and used machine screws. we have also used self tapping screws.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by SAMANTHA LAKO

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The Starboard works just like wood,screws hold better than wood as the Starboard is denser/stronger.Wood screws are best and drill holes as using wood.

Answered on 02/04/2013 by DOUG HENNESSEY

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"HI" carl, sheet metal screws work real well in king starboard If you are using it around salt water I would recommend stainless steel screws I would also recommend pre-driling or counter sinking screw- holes ... and I would practise on a scrap pice of starboard. Frank

Answered on 02/04/2013 by FRANK LINDSAY

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I haven't actually screwed to it. In my application I used it as an overlay to cover holes in the top of my console and my T-Top (bought the boat used). In my case I drilled counter sunk thru holes and attached to the material on the other side with stainless taper head screws.

Answered on 02/05/2013 by DEAN POETZL

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Very well, Imused stainless screws

Answered on 02/04/2013 by DAVE DEMUTH
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Question

How heavy is this product compared to wood? Is 1/2 inch strong enough for decking on a ski boat?

Asked on 09/13/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

There are two factors that in my view make Starboard unsuitable for decking. First, it is a thermoplastic so it will creep under load. This will only be more pronounced in direct sunlight. Second, and this is an even bigger issue, it is very slippery, and even more so when wet.

Answered on 09/15/2012 by TIMOTHY TAIT
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The way I like to think of weight on a boat is would the plastic float or sink. It will sink so that proves that it is heaver than wood not a lot but some. As far as strong enough for the deck would depend on the span of supports under the starboard. it is strong but maybe a little more flexible that wood. Hope that helps.

Answered on 09/14/2012 by LEON HOPKINS

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How heavy is king starboard 1/2? ..... Is about 3 times as heavy as the same size in marine plywood... and as for decking .... you can use it but it is flexable so it should be supported from underneath with ribs or some kind of suport. FRANK,

Answered on 09/17/2012 by FRANK LINDSAY

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Its probably 30% heavier if you compared it to 1/2 plywood or teak etc. I used it to manufacture some doors etc but remember two things, First its more flexible then wood aka if its not supported underneath it will bend. Second, in direct sunlight it expands and contracts quite a bit., I tried using 1/4 " black to replace the teak inlays on my swim platform and when it got heated up it rippled

Answered on 09/15/2012 by GREG BOSSI

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I doubt the 1/2" is strong enough. The material has flex in it... so maybe if it's supported often enough it would be suitable, but if it was my boat I wouldnt use it for that purpose.

Answered on 09/14/2012 by KIM HORN

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I used this product to make companionway boards for my 27' Sailboat. The material weight seems comparable to 1/2" plywood. The rep I spoke with at King Plastics regarding strength informed me anything you can do with 1/2" plywood can be done with King Starboard. I am very pleased with the weight, strength and appearance. The boat is on a mooring and has been exposed to the summer heat, sun & wind and rain from this seasons storms and still looks great. Comments by others on the Jamestown site were correct regarding how easy it is to work with this material.

Answered on 09/14/2012 by COBEY KAUFMAN

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I used the starboard to mount a trolling motor on my ski boat. The 1/2 inch needs some support if you are going to span much distance, say 12 to 16 inches. I would diffinately try to use the starboard since it can be worked like wood but requires no maintenance. I would say the starboard might be a little heavier than wood but it would depend on the type and quality of the marine grade wood. Let me know if you have any other questions. Terry. 303-815-8025

Answered on 09/14/2012 by TERRY SEXSON

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P.S. re: companionway boards - These are like doors to the sailboat cabin - they are boards mounted in slots on each side of the entry to the cabin steps. They slope inward from the top a few degrees. They do not carry weight but are sufficiently strong to resist break-ins.

Answered on 09/14/2012 by COBEY KAUFMAN

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It depends on how far apart the bracing is I used It on hatches that get walked on but they were not very wide ! It's not as rigid as plywood!

Answered on 09/14/2012 by CHRIS JENKINS

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For decking, I wouldn't go with anything less than 3/4" starboard. This material is a bit flimsy so 1/2

Answered on 09/14/2012 by JAMES PINTAURO
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Question

Does the white 1/2 inch material allow sunlight transmission when used as a deck hatch cover?

Asked on 06/11/2013 by Earl Torgerson

Top Answer

Sunlight transmission will depend on measurements and cutting.1/2" material will not support a person's weight (250)without support, 3/4" will. Great material for home projects.

Answered on 07/17/2013 by ROBERT DORCH
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Hi Earl, It would let in very little if any light.

Answered on 07/17/2013 by Glenn Sharkey

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No, it's very dense.

Answered on 06/17/2013 by GINO GUERCIO

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No, it is opaque.

Answered on 06/15/2013 by ALLAN DOZIER

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I honestly don't know.

Answered on 07/16/2013 by FRANK LINDSAY

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no

Answered on 06/14/2013 by JERRY JACKMAN

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No light gets through.

Answered on 07/17/2013 by DOUG HENNESSEY

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No, the 1/4" might but the 1/2" definitely will not. Hope this helps..

Answered on 07/16/2013 by RANDY SCOTT
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Question

Can I use fiberglass resin with it? I'm removing encapsulated plywood and need to glass the replacement in place.

Asked on 07/26/2013 by ken kross

Top Answer

Hi, Most sites advise against using any kind of adhesive with Starboard. It is fundamentally a plastic and I doubt fiberglass would adhere. I'd go with a composite such as All-A-Board(TM) from ELF Products, Inc. or something similar. You can google 'marine plywood composite replacement'. Good Luck and Keep Smiling

Answered on 07/27/2013 by ROBERT RUDOLF
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I doubt it. It seems too slippery. The manufacturer is your best source.

Answered on 08/10/2013 by ROBERT JOHNSON

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Resin will not stick to it

Answered on 07/27/2013 by HUGH HAZELTINE

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I do not know if the resin would harm the King Starboard. If you have to encapsulate the piece in resin, you lose the very benefit of using the King Starboard in the first place. Where are you planning on using this? Have you checked with a boatyard that also uses this product in a similar repair situation?

Answered on 07/30/2013 by WILLIAM STAFFELDT

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I used it on my boat and it work great with fiberglass resin

Answered on 07/28/2013 by PHILLIP BROCK

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Fiberglass will not bond to starboard.

Answered on 07/27/2013 by MICHAEL JOHNSON

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Not sure. Never tried

Answered on 07/27/2013 by JERRY JACKMAN
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Question

deck hatch covers 24"x24" is 1/2" thick enough?

Asked on 06/01/2013 by homer mcmillen

Top Answer

I would use 3/4 if it will be walked on

Answered on 06/01/2013 by MICHAEL JOHNSON
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I WOULD USE 3/4". 1/2" WILL HAVE SOME FLEXING IN A 2 FT. SPAN. IT'S NOT AS RIGID AS PLYWOOD.

Answered on 06/03/2013 by JAMES KRUG

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This material is very strong. It was easy to work with. I used it to replace the teak plywood companionway doors that were delaminating. While they are not cheap, they are effective and they require no upkeep. I will be trying the anti-slip version for replacement of the sole boards in the cabin. This is a great product that I will use in other outdoor projects where it is difficult to keep a finish on it without constant maintenance.

Answered on 06/03/2013 by WILLIAM STAFFELDT

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I did a deck hatch cover 24-26 in 1/2 and it has worked great.

Answered on 06/02/2013 by PHILLIP BROCK

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I made a lazarette hatch cover about 20x20; seems plenty strong for stepping on etc; If I would do it again I would cut the shape with a router; circular saw was kind of difficult

Answered on 06/02/2013 by KEVIN WENGER

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I can't help you much. I used the 1/2" for my swim ladder steps but there is a support that runs under the starborad.

Answered on 06/03/2013 by Tom Tom
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Is there a strength spec I need to know. I will be making a polling platform and putting it on my 17 foot flats boat?

Asked on 02/19/2013 by Tony Del

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It will bend unless it is well supported.

Answered on 04/07/2013 by MARK ERDOS
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I dont know of a spec but there is some flex, I would think you would need at least 1" thickness to meet your need.

Answered on 04/06/2013 by DOUG HENNESSEY

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Tony, I think it would need a supporting frame of some sort to give it more rigidity. It also might be a bit slippery.

Answered on 04/06/2013 by DOUGLAS BEATTIE

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The product is durable but it does flex it needs to be supported well on stainless or aluminum tubing if you are going to stand on it. It also may need some non skid treatment. I don't know the manufacturers exact specs. The 1/2" thickness is what I used for some trim and non structural items. I have not worked with 3/4 inch thickness though.

Answered on 02/20/2013 by JAMES BARGHAAN

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Starboard is not strucutal, its meant for mouldings and electronic boxes and cabinets, if you use it for a poling platform you will need 3/4 with a framing spaced 4 inches on center or you will fall through.

Answered on 02/20/2013 by STEVEN KASPER

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I don't know the strength spec of the product, but yes you would need to find that out- it is also made in 3/4" and 1" thick material. My personal opinion is that 1/2" Starboard would not be good for that application. Unless there are aluminum strips to give support under the board, it would be too weak to support a person. Also, it does not offer much traction.

Answered on 02/20/2013 by JOHN W RATCLIFF JR
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Question

Would this material work well as a replacement for 1/2 marine plywood floorboards? I'm not really worried about aesthetics...

Asked on 04/30/2016 by Jeff Chapman

Top Answer

Its a little pricy and it might be slippery when wet. Plastic also will bent if the floorboards support a weight across a span. It will last forever. You may want to order a smaller piece to give it a try before ordering a huge amount.

Answered on 05/01/2016 by ROBERT JOHNSON
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Yes, quite happily I would imagine

Answered on 05/01/2016 by TONY MCGIVERN

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I don't know the answer to this but it would be quite expensive. In our boat shop we use ply and "paint it" using epoxy mixed 50/50 with acetone. The acetone thins the epoxy and allows it to soak into the pores of the wood resulting in a waterproof surface that can be painted. Caution any holes drilled into the ply after treatment must be painted with the mixture.

Answered on 05/09/2016 by Tom Tom

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My primary use for this material has been for dash boards, console panels and light equipment mounts that are constantly exposed to the weather. This is a dense durable plastic material that won't rot or absorb liquids. It is easily to use for fabricating mechanically fastened parts using standard wood working tools. The sheet surfaces are smooth on one side and lightly textured on the reverse. Personally I wouldn't use it for flooring as it would be very slippery when it is wet. It is generally heavier per square foot and more expensive than a equal thickness of a good quality properly sealed marine grade structural plywood.

Answered on 05/03/2016 by GEORGE IRISH

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I don't think it would have the strength of 1/2 ply.

Answered on 05/02/2016 by Glenn Sharkey
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Question

will star board hold paint ?

Asked on 04/13/2015 by Undisclosed

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Nothing really sticks to it. You can't really glue it either. It has to be mechanically fastened.

Answered on 04/13/2015 by WILLIAM GAMACHE
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I haven't tried it, but I doubt it. It's high density polyethylene. Nothing sticks to it.

Answered on 04/13/2015 by JAMES OBERTHALER

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I painted Starboard with Home Depots Behr paint last year in a light traffic area. The paint shows no sign of problems at this time.

Answered on 04/13/2015 by THOMAS MCBRIDE

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I've never tried to paint it. I use it in high wear areas to avoid paint maintenance

Answered on 04/15/2015 by DOUGLAS BEATTIE

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I haven't tried but I doubt it. Mechanical means are the only way to bond anything to starboard. Not even epoxy or caulk.

Answered on 04/14/2015 by GREGORY BOURESSA
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Question

What does starboard weigh?

Asked on 02/19/2013 by Tony Del

Top Answer

Tony, I bought a 24" X 24" X 1/2" section it was mailed to me and the packing slip said 13 pounds. I would say the box accounted for a pound. I hope this helped you. Johnn yH

Answered on 03/05/2013 by JOHNNY HOLLAND
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The starboard sheets seem about 1/3 heavier than comparable thickness plywood it is dense but cuts fine on my table saw. It can be routed at slow speed to reduce melting,and edges need sanding after cutting. I use carbide blades/bits

Answered on 02/20/2013 by JAMES BARGHAAN

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The 1/2" King Starboard does not weigh that much. A half sheet weighs 15 lbs. Great size for tackle boxes, cutting boards, trolling motor mounts, storage boxes.

Answered on 03/07/2013 by ROBERT DORCH

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Sorry this took so long. The piece I have left was buried and inaccessible. I finally dug it out. ALthough it's slightly irregular, a careful measurement places the area at 4.20 sq ft. This piece weighs almost exactly 10 pounds. So we have about 2.38 pounds per square foot for the 1/2" thick starboard. Hope this helps.

Answered on 03/15/2013 by JAMES OBERTHALER

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It weighs about the same as plywood.

Answered on 03/06/2013 by MARK ERDOS
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Is this good material for floor replacement?

Asked on 05/10/2015 by Undisclosed

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I assume you're considering using it as replacement flooring in a boat. I think it would be durable; however it has two disadvantages when compared to fiberglass. First, it's not as strong, so when used as flooring, it would have to be well supported. Suggest you get a piece of 1/2" material and stand on it with the supports about 18" - 24" apart. I think you'll find the Starboard deflects significantly. Secondly, Starboard is relatively heavy. Replacing an entire floor in a boat would add a significant amount of weight, and that is never good in a boat. Just thought of a third disadvantage. Starboard is expensive!! Good luck. OBTW, I used Starboard to make a relatively small door, so none of the mentioned disadvantages came into play.

Answered on 05/11/2015 by RON GLOCKNER
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Personally I would not use this material for floor replacement. Although the material is waterproof and can be worked with standard wood working tools it has a lightly textured smooth surface. Because it is a plastic, it can be very slippery when either dry or wet.

Answered on 05/11/2015 by GEORGE IRISH

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I wouldn't think so. It is quite soft and would wear fast.

Answered on 05/10/2015 by DAVID HOWES

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I have used it for stern seats and hatch covers. Both get walked on and seems to be just fine. If your floor is well supported then you can use the thinner material. If not I would use some of the thicker board.

Answered on 05/10/2015 by LARRY CRAIGIE
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