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Beckson Thirsty-Mate Pumps
$30.42Limited Stock
thirstymate portable hand bilge pump
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Beckson Thirsty-Mate Pumps Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 15 Questions

Question

I have trouble imagining how to use this. Just stick the straight part (on the left in this picture) into the bottom of the boat, hang the hose part (on the right in this picture?) over the side, then pull and push the red handle? Isn't it tiring to do this after a while? Does the handle hurt your hand so a glove is required?

Asked on 07/30/2011 by Mike Fitzgerald

Top Answer

The way you describe the use is exactly the way you use this pump. I bought one to keep in my daysail sailboat to pump out my bilge after it rains and it works great. It takes no more effort to use than a bicycle tire pump. I have found out that the amount of water moved is equal to the distance you move the handle. In other words, if you pull the handle full stroke, you move the maximum amount of water and you empty whatever you are pumping faster. If you use short strokes, you are moving less water and it will take longer to pump out your boat. The handle is comfortable and you don't need gloves to operate.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by RICHARD KURLINSKI
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Thank you for taking the time to reply. You really did help me decide to buy.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by Mike Fitzgerald

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I have used mine several times to remove standing water in the bottom of my boat refurbishment project. You just slowly pull up on the handle and the water is ejected on the down stroke. I was using a slow and steady pace and had no problems with this pump hurting my hands. I will say I never had to remove more than 10 gallon at any one time. It worked great for me.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by ROBERT CUNNINGHAM

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Mike. You've got the idea. The handle is well designed and doesn't hurt. These pumps are great to have around as backups to an electric pump or for dinghies and skiffs without batteries. You won't be disappointed.

Answered on 08/08/2011 by SAM BRADFORD

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Thank you for taking the time to reply. You really did help me decide to buy.

Answered on 08/06/2011 by Mike Fitzgerald

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It is really not that hard on the hands. If there is lots of water, it becomes slightly tiring. I just switch hands, when one gets tired. You are correct on the procedure. It doesn't get much easier!

Answered on 08/04/2011 by ROBERT DULA

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Mike, Yes, you description of how it works is correct. This pump is quite effecient and a lot of water gets discharged as you push and pull the red handle. Only if you have a lot of water to pump will it get tiring. I don't think you'll need a glove.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by HUNT LEAVITT

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The way you imagine is exactly right. I never got tired using mine. You might not want it as your only option for getting water out of the boat. Something else to bail with would be a good idea. I never felt the need for a glove either.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by SAM SCOVILLE

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Thanks for answering. Your comments are in line with others. Good information.

Answered on 08/09/2011 by Mike Fitzgerald

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I use mine to pump the oil from my turkey fryer. It is a slow draw up and down. It is nor tiring, but it doesn't go quickly.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by JAMES SATOW
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Question

We have a sump pump in our basement. When electric goes out we have a flood real fast. Can this pump be used to pump the water from down in the sump pump to up into buckets. Or do we need a different type of hand pump? thank you for your help

Asked on 10/28/2012 by Al Monzo

Top Answer

I have one of these for my boat. I've used it several times to pump water out of towables. It works well, but it is labor intensive and slow. I would not recommend this if you have a large volume of water to pump in a short amount of time. For your sump pump situation, I would probably recommend some kind of submersible pump that can run off of a 12v battery pack like a car jump starter pack. I have a Tsunami pump for my FatSacs which plugs into the lighter and it moves huge volumes of water very quickly.

Answered on 10/29/2012 by Mike Mike
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Answer

Yes, it can -- but it might not be able to process enough water to prevent that fast-growing flood Al describes. The Thirsty-Mate can handle about 2 to 3 feet of elevation difference very easily; I think that's enough to keep a sump "mostly" clear. I bought mine to pump out a well giving access to my house's crawl space, on the strength of memories of owning the same make and model for a boat I owned in 1968. It worked perfectly on the water seeping into that well, except for sucking up fallen leaves, and a kitchen strainer under it took care of that. It has a fairly good flow for a hand pump, but in gallons per minute it's nothing like a sump pump. that's why I'm not positive it could keep up with Al's flood. You might need more than one person to handle the buckets. You can pump with one hand and hold the output hose into the bucket with the other, but when it comes time to exchange the full for an empty bucket, you'll need an assistant. The Thirsty-Mate has one weakness you need to be aware of: the connection of the flexible output hose with the pump body is not so secure as it was on the 1968 model, which had a spring steel clip, sheathed in plastic, to hold them together. The modern pump requires that you screw the two parts together very hard using soap as a lubricant. This is OK most of the time but every now and then the hose will come off because the pump produces such a powerful stream of water. Of course that will spray everyone in a 5-foot radius, including the person pumping. This could be really annoying if it's winter!

Answered on 10/31/2012 by STEVEN TOBY

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Al You could use this pump but your arms and shoulders will tire quickly. You would be better off getting a small generator that will run your sump pump. I have a small Honda generator 2000W that runs my sump pump and my refrigerator during a power outage. Gavin

Answered on 10/29/2012 by GAVIN WATSON

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You could use this hand pump but your arms and shoulders will get tired after a short while. A small generator that will run your sump pump would probably be a better idea. I have a small Honda 2000W generator that runs my sump pump and also my refrigerator during a power outage. Gavin

Answered on 10/29/2012 by GAVIN WATSON

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Thanks for information Michael, I'll give it some thought.

Answered on 10/30/2012 by Al Monzo

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Thanks for the idea of a generator. Also, looking into battery back-up for the pump. Need to give some thought to all of this. Al

Answered on 10/30/2012 by Al Monzo

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Thanks Sam for the reply, looking into battery backup for sump pump. Al

Answered on 10/30/2012 by Al Monzo

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Al, Yes this would do the trick. But I wouldn't want to rely on a hand pump for an extended pumping session, or a constant need, such as during a long outage as a result of a hurricane!

Answered on 10/29/2012 by SAM BRADFORD
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Question

we want a pump to pump water from a mop bucket(s) up to a sink on the wall (up a few feet higher) Will this pump pump a few gallons of water relatively easily? Can the hose be changed out to a longer one (4-6') to reach the sink ?

Asked on 06/11/2014 by safety safety

Top Answer

I have not put the pump in service yet, and while I think it will likely pump the mop water up a few feet, I know you'll need a longer discharge hose than the one that comes with the pump. I ended up buying a washing machine discharge hose from Lowe's, about 6 feet long, that fits the Beckson pump discharge pipe fairly snugly - haven't actually pumped any water with it yet.

Answered on 06/11/2014 by FRED FEAD
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Answer

Yes, the pump will work fine for what you need it to do. I use mine to pump out a 3.5 foot tall urn-shaped fountain in the fall to prevent water from freezing in it; the pump reaches all the way to the bottom and the water is pulled out with enough force that adding a somewhat longer hose should not be a problem.

Answered on 06/11/2014 by JOHN WILKINSON

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Yes this pump will easily move a few gallons quickly. although the hose is only about 30" ft long. There may be one with a longer hose, I do not think they are replaceable

Answered on 06/11/2014 by IAN PARKER

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thank-you for your response.

Answered on 06/11/2014 by safety safety

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There is one version with a 6" hose

Answered on 06/11/2014 by IAN PARKER
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Question

How does this deal with dirty water? Any filter to keep debris out of the pump? Sandy or muddy water bother it?

Asked on 01/14/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It seems to work pretty well with muddy/sandy water. I use it for pumping water out of the well access in my basement. I have had to occasionally stop to clear a pebble from the end, but it generally works pretty well.

Answered on 01/14/2014 by ALAN CALDER
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No filter, but pump is not bothered by muddy water or sand, it will pick it up and eject it. I use it daily for my dinghy and it is always pushing mud and sand.

Answered on 01/15/2014 by CHARLES FREEMAN

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What little i have used it mud and sand while in solution has not bothered it. What has been a problem is larger particles like leaves as they block the pump pickup and have to be removed. As a tip my pump sits in clips so is easily removed to clean the pickup.

Answered on 01/14/2014 by RICHARD GREENWAY

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I've used in both sandy and very muddy water and it has worked great in both situations. Mud does get in the pump but it never stopped working.

Answered on 01/14/2014 by CHRIS KAZE
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Question

Does this pump pull water through it in both directions - while pullng and pushing the handle?

Asked on 07/19/2011 by Jan Beekman

Top Answer

Yes, but substantially more water comes through on the pull stroke. I tested it to monitor both strokes. Some water is pumped on the push, but much more is pumped on the pull.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by ALAN CALDER
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Answer

And, reading Charles F's comment, I agree that is how it works. But when I push down, a little water is displaced that comes out the tube. The main action is certainly on the pull, though. Hope this helps.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by ALAN CALDER

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no.just when you pull up on the handle.but it pulls a very large volume of water.

Answered on 08/04/2011 by JOHN H TRIPLER

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No, it just feels like it. When you pull up, the valve on the piston closes, the valve on the bottom of the pump opens, and you pull a column of water into the pump body. When you push down, the valve on the bottom of the pump closes, the valve on the piston opens, and you force the piston down through that column of water. When you pull up the next time, the closed piston both ejects the column of water above it out the outflow pipe, while simultaneously filling a second column of water into the pump body.

Answered on 08/05/2011 by CHARLES FREEMAN
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Question

How to remove the foot?

Asked on 01/02/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The foot is glued on the pump body. You would have to cut it off, which may destroy the pump if you are not careful.

Answered on 01/02/2015 by HERBERT MEADE
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Answer

If by the ’¢??foot’¢?? you mean the bottom of the rigid tube, that would be a mistake. That is where the diaphragm is. If you remove that, you won’¢??t have a pump anymore. Otherwise, I don’¢??t know what you mean about the ’¢??foot’¢?? if this doesn’¢??t answer your question. Try it a different way.

Answered on 01/03/2015 by RICK VOEGE

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Hammer it off using a block of wood as a "chisel". Do it often

Answered on 01/03/2015 by LOUIS NEUDER
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Question

What is the lift height (height that water can be pumped)?

Asked on 05/29/2016 by Paul Silverman

Top Answer

Have used the 24" with 6-foot hose in daysailer where gunwale is a good 3' above the floor. No problems. The suction is quite strong and would, I expect, pump to the limit of the hose, but you would certainly experience backwash when you stopped pumping unless you immediately lifted the pump to the maximum height of the hose.

Answered on 05/30/2016 by Daniel Lawrence
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Answer

About as long as the hose that is on it, or that you added to it. Probably could do about 10 feet. Once the pump is primed, you are pushing or lifting the water when you pull the handle up.

Answered on 05/30/2016 by DALE KLEIN
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Question

I have two kayaks-a tandem and a a one man-I am looking for pump to pump out the water from the winter--what size should I buy?

Asked on 06/08/2015 by sheila G

Top Answer

Probably the smallest. Flow capacity is the same for all, it's just the shaft length that is different. How deep is your largest compartment? That's the shaft length you should buy.

Answered on 06/08/2015 by COLIN MACINNES
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Answer

The smallest one, without the hose, works fine for pumping out small amounts of water in a canoe / kayak.

Answered on 06/08/2015 by DALE KLEIN
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Question

what is the outside diameter of the bottom of the pump?

Asked on 09/19/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I measure 2" at the bottom, 1 3/4" for the tube. Hope this helps.

Answered on 09/22/2013 by ALAN CALDER
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Answer

2.0 inches

Answered on 09/23/2013 by STEPHEN BECK-VON-PECCOZ
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Question

Thirsty mate pump lost suction. When this happened in the past I was able to restore the suction by placing both end of the pump in the harbor. This method isn't working this year.I suspect an o ring or gasket needs replacing. Is this possible?

Asked on 08/11/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It sounds like the o-ring or seal on the piston has failed. I don't believe this is a replaceable item.

Answered on 08/11/2015 by Rick White
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