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Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue
$6.26Limited Stock
titebond iii ultimate wood glue
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Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue Customer Questions and Answers

9 of 9 Questions

Question

Can Titebond III be used for below waterline boat building or not? I see conflicting reports.

Asked on 12/13/2011 by JIM Busard

Top Answer

I use tightbond 3 in my strip built boats to glue strips to each other, but that glue is then encapsulated in epoxy and fiberglass. I find that if I stick a glue brush in warm water after using it I can easily clean the glue out of the brush the next day. This makes me reluctant to use it under the water line or any place structural unless it is encapsulated in epoxy and glass.

Answered on 12/30/2011 by JOE THOMPSON
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No

Answered on 12/29/2011 by LYLE E. CARLON

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I can just say what they advertise. It is waterproof once dry. I used it to glue two pieces of plywood together to restore my transom.

Answered on 12/30/2011 by ROGER FURLONG

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While Titebond III is theoretically waterproof, I would not use it below the waterline. I would suggest 5200 or similar product.

Answered on 12/30/2011 by MICHAEL WARREN

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I'm far from the ocean out here in New Mexico, but I have cold-molded a 10'- dinghy, and done other marine woodwork, often out in the field. I would only trust a good 2-part epoxy formulated for submerged hulls - like the West System resins. The Titebond III is a fantastic glue, good outdoors in our climate with abrupt extreme weather changes. When the joining surfaces are well-mated, and there is enough glue, and there is good saturation into the dry wood, then everything is all right. But failures do occur when the gluing workmanship is of a poor quality. Epoxy resins are more difficult to use, but more forgiving of hasty joinery, and you can add fillers (after you've saturated the mating surfaces first, for a few minutes, or until the wood has stopped absorbing the resin and remains wetted), which allow for a sloppy fit to hold well. If you want to experiment, glue up a decent sized test joint or laminate two strips together, submerge the piece in a bucket of water for a week, and then try to destroy the joint. The wood should fail first.

Answered on 12/30/2011 by MARK BALENOVIC

Answer

Jim, Personal opinion here, but I would use either an epoxy based adhesive or something like 3-M 5200 on below waterline applications. I do think highly of Titebond III and have used it successfully on above waterline applications that were occasionally exposed to moisture but were sealed with a paint or varnish. I hope this helped. Ray

Answered on 01/01/2012 by RAYMOND HY

Answer

I have never used it for under water like on a boat, but getting rained on does not seem to hurt it at all; but here is a forum post about from a wood working magazine: Posted: Sat Jul 10, 2004 2:20 am Post subject: Titebond III Does not Perform -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Wood Magazine this month has a great article comparing the major brand glues. The 6 page article tests for strength and water resistance. In a water resistant test, glued joints were submerged in water for 24 hours. Surprisingly Titebond III scored worse than Titebond II. The TB II joint held up to about 300 PSI. TB III failed at about 200 PSI. So I guess you should save your money. TBIII is typically 60% more expensive than TB II. There was a discussion a few weeks ago about the TB III compared to Polyurethanes for water resistance. Polyurethanes win. In the same test as mentioned above, the Elmer's ProBond and Gorilla Glue Polyurethane joint held up to almost 1000 PSI. TB III held up to 200 PSI.

Answered on 12/30/2011 by alanj alanj
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Question

can this glue be used below the waterline?

Asked on 03/28/2016 by steve Last Name

Top Answer

I have not used it below waterline.

Answered on 03/28/2016 by HENRY COLEMAN
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I have seen bungs below the waterline (painted of course) which were fine after several seasons. Not sure wheter it would hold if exposed directly to water.

Answered on 03/28/2016 by FRANCIS HOPKINSON

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Yes but I wound not unless it's a temporary situation. Use a product like G-Flex by west systems.

Answered on 04/27/2016 by ROBERT GILLEN

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I wouldn't even try to use it below the waterline. It is not worth the risk. Spend the money on epoxy

Answered on 03/28/2016 by MIKE PYDYNKOWSKI
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Question

how long do I have to work the parts together before the glue skins over ?

Asked on 05/17/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Open time on III is advertised as 15 minutes, I have found that I want my joint together in 5 and clamped in 10. Pre-glue test fits are the key. III IS the best there is by the way. FPL III

Answered on 06/19/2012 by F.P. LYNAH III
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when I am strip planking it often takes 5-10 minutes to get the strip in place and clamped. Longer than 10 minutes would definitely cause skin over problems. JT

Answered on 06/20/2012 by JOE THOMPSON

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At least a few minutes, but passes fast if you are working. I have used it to glue 1 1/2" X 9 foot slates in a curved form together and it gave me enough time to apply glue and clamp it in place.

Answered on 06/20/2012 by MARK WALLACE

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The size of your glue surface ( the time it takes to cover the glue area(s) the air and material temp all need to be considered when gluing up. Open glued faces remain usable for perhaps 5-7 minutes ? I've worked multi layer laminations for as much as 15 -20 minutes by gluing the laminates and placing them together keeping the air off the surfaces then bringing them to the mold ,clamping to the desired shape. Practice on less complicated glue ups will provide the experience to confidently engage in bigger laminations/ Scott B

Answered on 06/20/2012 by SCOTT J BELL
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Question

I'm building a center board from oak planks glued together. Will this bond hold while submerged for extended periods of time?

Asked on 02/24/2014 by JOHN HOUSTLE

Top Answer

I can't speak from direct experience with this type of application but It seems to me that the most important product will be your exterior finish. This is a great glue for boats but you still have to have a real good finish to protect it. That being said, it should be up for the job.

Answered on 02/25/2014 by MICHAEL ORR
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Answer

Titebond III is classed as a waterproof adhesive and approved by the FDA for indirect contact with food. (can be used to glue up cutting boards). the standards for "waterproof adhesive" include maintaining bond strength in boiling water for more than 24 hours, and indefinitely under normal conditions. So the adhesive itself will not degrade due to anything you're going to do with a boat. The wood will rot off the glue before the glue lets go. Titebond II, while only "water resistant" is usually more than adequate for most boat-building. and easier to clean up. (although I'd recommend titebond III for a centerboard.) Whether the mechanical properties of the bond will meet your needs is another question.

Answered on 02/25/2014 by JAMES CRAWFORD

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I do like titebond III I would the much more comfortable using an epoxy for an underwater application like a center board trunk. in the 50 years we've owned our wooden schooner we have replaced many planks below the waterline. In recent years we've switched from traditional but block joints to long overlapping epoxy joints. I have used West epoxy for years and I'm very accustomed to how it performs.

Answered on 02/24/2014 by ANDY BEZANSON
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Question

Does this product make any claims of UV resistance? I am considering it for the glue uuup of a mast and will be using Watco Danish oil as a finish, ( not traditional I know but I have had very good luck with Watco applicaation ease, mauintainence, and durability, plus I don't plan on submerging my mast.

Asked on 11/14/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have sucsessfully used TiteBond III to glue Mahogany to Mahogany and Mahogany to Marine Plywood. The assemblies were finished with water based stain and then received 6 coats of marine varnish. I have seen so signs of seperation or failure at the joints. Realistically, the glue joint will not be exposed directly to sunlight so I'm not sure UV resistance would be an issue. (as long as the wood is sealed) I would focus the question more on what kind of wood are you glueing together ( is this glue the best choice for that wood?) and what kind of shear loads will the glue joint be put under. A mast can be placed under considerable load so I recommend some careful research prior to laying it up. Good Luck- Ray Hy

Answered on 11/15/2011 by RAYMOND HY
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The glue joint really shouldn't be much of a problem as far as UV exposure goes, if you use the glue as a glaze than maybe, but just as a glue up I've never heard of problems stemming from that issue. This product is definitely your best bet for your application though. (although if you're not submerging your mast or using it as a cutting board, then you might have just as good luck with Titebond II, and save yourself a few pennies) -All the Best

Answered on 11/14/2011 by JAMES CRAWFORD
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Question

is quart the smallest size? I only need a small amt.

Asked on 06/03/2015 by Wes Chapman

Top Answer

I ordered this item, but it was not available. Try Sticky Jack Glue.

Answered on 06/05/2015 by HENRY COLEMAN
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Question

is this glue suitable for fabricating wooden oars?

Asked on 08/17/2014 by don Pigeon

Top Answer

I think the "TitebondIII" would be poor choice for oars, although, it is my choice when it comes to a glue. My ONLY choice for making oars would be "G-felx" by West Systems.

Answered on 08/18/2014 by ROBERT GILLEN
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Question

Should I use this to bond the keel and centerboard shaft of my wooden sailboat? If so, on bare wood, or paint it first? Carl W.

Asked on 07/23/2014 by Carl Webber

Top Answer

I ordered this product last month, but it was not available and was deleted from my order. Sorry I can't offer an opinion.

Answered on 07/23/2014 by HENRY COLEMAN
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Question

Can I usr Titebond III Ultimate Glue wood to make laminated wood frames , water may be in the bilge at times, but I plan to seal and paint the frames also.?

Asked on 06/21/2012 by William Richards

Top Answer

I recommend using "WEST SYSTEM" epoxy in conjunction with "WSY-404" which has the highest rating for laminating instead, this will ensure maximum strength and waterproofing, afterwards a simple sand and clean and it's ready for paint, thank you.

Answered on 07/23/2012 by Nathan Fournier
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