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WEST System 105 Epoxy Resin
$36.07In Stock
WEST System Epoxy Resin, 105 fiberglass resin
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WEST System 105 Epoxy Resin Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 105 Questions

Question

I have made 2 cypress garden chairs that I'd like to delay greying. Can I use solvent diluted West 105 epoxy system to infiltrate the wood and polymerize similar to commercial penetrating oil finishes where excess is wiped off surface prior to hardening? If yes, what solvent? LB

Asked on 01/14/2016 by Leonard Beuving

Top Answer

To the best of my knowledge, WEST system does not have any solvents for thinning the epoxy. You risk degrading the epoxy or having it not properly cure if you add something. Two suggestions: 1.discuss this directly with their technical staff- they are exceedingly helpful. 2. System Three markets a sealer epoxy for this purpose.

Answered on 01/14/2016 by JAMES LOVE
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Answer

The only solvent that does not impede the curing/hardening process, is 90% isopropyl alcohol, at 10% of total volume! Alcohol evaporates quite rapidly, pay attention to the thickness as you go along. Good luck with your project•À_?_..

Answered on 01/14/2016 by DAVID PAGE

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LB, I have not used that product in that way. I would think you are looking for a thinning agent and not a solvent to be able to apply and wipe application. Acetone is a solvent for resin but I think will interfere with the curing process.

Answered on 01/14/2016 by RICK ECCLES

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Thanks Fred: Nice to hear someone else has made pieces from cypress. I purchased some of West's CPES epoxy sealer today which can be cleaned with water. I will try it on scrap. I've had problems with varnishes and tung oil on outside teak and epe. Wood often looks like it is covered with plastic wrap for 1-2 years and then becomes blotchy grey. I do not like refinishing an item that frequently, so I'll try this product even though UV protection is negligble. Thanks again---you seem knowledgeable. LB

Answered on 01/15/2016 by Leonard Beuving

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Thanks James---I am pursuing the penetrating sealer option. LB

Answered on 01/19/2016 by Leonard Beuving

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Rick: Thanks---I'm not sure what the thinner vs. solvent distinction means. However inhibition of curing is worrisome even though acetone will evaporate quickly, so I will try the idea out on scraps. LB

Answered on 01/14/2016 by Leonard Beuving

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Dear Leonard, I have made some cypress chairs and would only use epoxy to laminate, repair or prevent further damage from existing problems. I think, that no matter how hard you try you would not get all the epoxy off the wood fibers (unless you re-sanded) and even then, if there were cracks, they might not grey as the rest of the piece would. The epoxy difference would be negligible if the cypress was left "natural" and finished with varnish, tung oil or something similar. A great epoxy clean-up is simple vinegar. I would not recommend something to "thin" epoxy.

Answered on 01/15/2016 by FRED GEIGER

Answer

I have great success thinning West System, standardly one can use acetone or lacquer thinner. As for preventing greying of the wood, I've used this technique under varnish on my brightwork, but not epoxy alone,although it should provide some protection. However, ultraviolet will deteriorate the epoxy alone, but when I varnished over it, the varnish contained substantial ultraviolet inhibitors. I would suggest the epoxy used with a protective top coating.

Answered on 01/15/2016 by Rick Contestabile

Answer

Thank you Wayne: I'll search for the penetrating non sealer. I don't know the properties of an epoxy type, but have used hydrocarbon types a lot. I think I want to seal the pores to block water and mold spore infiltration. Cypress has many large conduction pores. I appreciate the feedback from several of the sites' readers. LB

Answered on 01/15/2016 by Leonard Beuving

Answer

The epoxy resin you are referring to will seal the pores in the wood. That is what it is designed to do. Use the penetrating type non sealer for that application in my opinion.

Answered on 01/15/2016 by WAYNE DAMGAR
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Question

Can I apply a Latex paint over this?

Asked on 04/03/2016 by Ron Labrousse

Top Answer

No its not necessary, but long term it will hold up better.

Answered on 04/04/2016 by PAUL WHITE
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Thank you.

Answered on 04/04/2016 by Ron Labrousse

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Thanks Paul. Is it necessary to use a primer, or can I paint right over it?

Answered on 04/04/2016 by Ron Labrousse

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Yes,light sanding with 220,wipe down with acetone, I like to use stix primer,and then paint.

Answered on 04/04/2016 by PAUL WHITE

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Prior to applying any paint (or anything else) over the epoxy, you need to thoroughly wash off the amine blush with water. Then sand to whatever level of smoothness you wish to achieve. The latex paint will adhere quite well.

Answered on 04/03/2016 by JAMES LOVE

Answer

Yes you can. But first you should let it cure and then remove the amine blush by scrubbing it with warm water. Then, sand the surface to give the paint sufficient "tooth." At that point you can paint with just about anything.

Answered on 04/03/2016 by JEFF HUFFENBERGER

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Yes,light sanding with 220,wipe down with acetone, I like to use stix primer,and then paint.

Answered on 04/04/2016 by PAUL WHITE

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Sure. Wash first with soap and water. Appy a primer and then ext or marine paint.

Answered on 04/03/2016 by RICHARD BENSON

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Yes,light sanding with 220,wipe down with acetone, I like to use stix primer,and then paint.

Answered on 04/04/2016 by PAUL WHITE
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Question

Will this turn a milky white when exposed to sunlight or will it remain clear?

Asked on 08/06/2013 by James Hasty

Top Answer

Thanks David

Answered on 08/07/2013 by James Hasty
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Answer

The answer is yes. Used as a cear coat on exterior wood you will need to cover with varnish or cetol. Better yet for wood use Clear Penetrating Epioxy Sealer by Smith.

Answered on 08/07/2013 by JAMES LEA

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Thanks Craig. I used some West system epoxy years ago on a couple wood strip canoes. It was a beautiful clear finish until it was exposed to the sun for a while. Then it turned a milky white. Jim

Answered on 08/07/2013 by James Hasty

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Thanks Thomas, I will remember to get the 207 hardener. It will probably be fall by the time I get around to using it, so the humidity should be down by then! Jim

Answered on 08/07/2013 by James Hasty

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Thanks James, I appreciate the advice.

Answered on 08/07/2013 by James Hasty

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My experience has been that the epoxy has a color to it and it is not clear but milky regardless of sun or not

Answered on 08/07/2013 by CRAIG BARRETT

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It will turn milky white.

Answered on 08/07/2013 by DAVID FRASE

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It should stay clear when used with the special 207 clear hardener and properly mixed. But also use it in low humidity if possible to avoid having moisture in the piece, and be sure to coat it with at least 5 coats of a UV blocking varnish to protect the epoxy from the sunlight's UV damage.

Answered on 08/06/2013 by THOMAS STAKELUM
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Question

Hi, Will this adhere rubber to a piece of wood together?

Asked on 11/02/2011 by Ananda Cavalli

Top Answer

Ananda, I would not recommend using the West System 105 for your application but rather the West System T-88.

Answered on 11/02/2011 by BRET SMITH
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Answer

Yes , but not reliable for long term fix. Will adhere to flat surface with limited side pull, but will ultimately fail over time .

Answered on 11/04/2011 by WAYNE BARTOW

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Not knowing the application, I would say no. Rubber is a tough one. I would suggest Gorilla glue, It's great stuff

Answered on 11/02/2011 by PAUL BLAZEJESKI

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I think it should however I have never tried it. The rubber would need to be clean and dry and probably scuff it up like you would if you were doing a bicycle tube repair.

Answered on 11/03/2011 by PAUL COTTRELL

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The real strength of epoxy is in its ability to get into a material (such as the pores in wood) and form strong bonds. If the rubber is porous, the bond may hold. If it is not porous, I would not trust the bond. I would think a cement intended for rubber would work better.

Answered on 11/03/2011 by DAVID BOLING

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Ananda, I have not used the West System to bind rubber with wood. I would suspect that it could be used, if the rubber is not too soft. Walter

Answered on 11/02/2011 by WALTER H DITTRICH

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Rubber? Probably not. Neoprene absolutely yes. Are you sure it's actually rubber?

Answered on 11/02/2011 by MIKE TABER

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Yes, you can get some degree of adhesion if the rubber is roughed up and it is a neoprene type. The bond will not be a strong one though, for best results with neoprene use BARGE Cement. Glen

Answered on 11/03/2011 by GLEN DEMARAY
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Question

Can this product be used on my butcher block counter top?

Asked on 12/21/2016 by Robert Becsey

Top Answer

Thanks you for your resonse

Answered on 12/21/2016 by Robert Becsey
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Answer

I think it can be used on practically any wood for a nice finish. Just try to apply it as smooth and level as possible. It's quite hard and difficult to sand.

Answered on 12/21/2016 by DALE ANDERSON

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Absolutely.. I've made several butcher block counter tops for customers and have used West System 105 epoxy resin with their super clean Hardener, 207. Just make sure that the epoxy has time to throughly dry before using it. I've found that it takes about 5-7 days for the epoxy to really get super hard.

Answered on 12/23/2016 by Don Kerr

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Thanks Matt. I'll take your advise and directions

Answered on 12/21/2016 by Robert Becsey

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Yes, if it Is a new top without any embedded grease etc. Works best with a roller and a tipping brush. The finish will be bright and smooth but very prone to scratches from utensils. It will not take abuse as well as formica. Good luck Mike

Answered on 12/22/2016 by MICHAEL GORDON

Answer

Absolutely. However you need to use the special clear hardener (I believe it's 206). Otherwise it will alter the color of your countertop. Other thing is you need to thoroughly degrease and de-oil the countertop. I use acetone. Finally, apply 3-4 coats (without sanding), waiting 3-4hours in between depending on temperature. It will look awesome.

Answered on 12/21/2016 by MATT CRANE

Answer

I would not recommend any epoxy for the top surface of a butcher block. This gets hard (obviously) and I feel that chopping on the butcher block will ultimately break off very small amounts of the material and contaminate the food items. These probably would be complete inert once cured and "microscopic" in size, but why not just use a natural food quality oil finish on the surface. If the surface is other than decorative, then I'd go with a quality oil finish. Just my thoughts.

Answered on 12/21/2016 by ROGER HINSDALE
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Question

can I use this product to fix canoe? It required be flexible.

Asked on 07/17/2015 by zdzislaw Ptak

Top Answer

Do I need use hardener to fix canoe with this product? If yes, wich one and how much I need buy?

Answered on 07/18/2015 by zdzislaw Ptak
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Answer

It is a hard curing product but is slightly flexible depending on the thickness. For large areas of a canoe, using with 4oz cloth will protect or bridge damaged areas. For small holes, mixing with sawdust or filler powder will close holes but the area will be inflexible. This product will add rigidity and weight anywhere it is used.

Answered on 07/18/2015 by THOMAS STAKELUM

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It depends on what you are fixing. You can use it on wood and it will be stronger that the wood itself. The epoxy is not flexible but the wood around it still is, again depending on what you are fixing. If you want something somewhat flexible, I'd go with something like 5200, but again it depends on what you are fixing.

Answered on 09/05/2015 by FRED GEIGER

Answer

If the canoe is fiberglass or wood it is the best choice of resin to use. West System is very flexible and strong. I use it a lot on my wood boats. If the canoe is plastic consult West system tech support. Good luck

Answered on 07/17/2015 by Ed Ward

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Ed W'answer is spot on.

Answered on 09/03/2015 by HOWARD COHEN

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Yes, it is a two part mix. Use 205 for a working time of 45 min, 206 slow hardener for 1-2 hours, or 207 if you need a clear finish. You should also get the mini pump kit to get the right mix of each. This is critical, as is working at the right temperature range of about 20-30 celsius.

Answered on 07/18/2015 by THOMAS STAKELUM

Answer

Can I add to my order hardener 207 for 2at raisin?

Answered on 07/18/2015 by zdzislaw Ptak
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Question

If I purchase .98 gallon of west system 105, how much 207 hardener do I need?

Asked on 03/13/2012 by Paul Schuster

Top Answer

Paul, I believe the resin-to-hardner ratio is 5:1 for all West System two-part epoxy products. The answer with certainty can be found on Jamestown's website or you can call them; they are very helpful and knowledgeable. Also, I highly recommend getting a set of pumps. I Didn't with my first order. I needed only a small quantity of epoxy for my project (it goes a LONG way- a gallon will do the side of your house - check with them for coverage ) and figured I could measure accurately enough. I tested first before applying it to my work, found I couldn't get it quite right, and ordered a set. They work perfectly. Good luck.

Answered on 04/01/2012 by BOB KIP
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Answer

instructions are on the cans it's very easy to mix start out making small batches until you get the nack of it

Answered on 03/13/2012 by CHRIS FALLACARA

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I would suggest getting a quart of hardener.

Answered on 03/15/2012 by RONALD MORGAN

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Paul, Go to the West System website for the information you requested. search west system epoxy and go to coating quantity for .98 Gal of Epoxy, you should need 1.32 Quarts of 207 hardener. I have found the measuring pumps are quite accurate and I always pump my mixes. That way I don't waste any due to premature curing.

Answered on 03/13/2012 by MICHAEL ABERNETHY

Answer

Paul, I'm using 206 hardener with 105 resin to provide a longer working time (20-25 minutes vs 9 to 12 minutes for 205 hardener). The mix ratio on the hardener can calls for five parts of resin to one part of hardener by weight or volume. I'm dispensing by mini-pump, but you can do the math if you're going by wt or vol. The resin can directs you to the hardener can for mix ratios, so the proper ratio appears to be a function of the hardner, not the resin. Also, both cans direct you to the West System User Manual and Product Guide for instructions. Jamestown's Web site contains many worthwhile instructional papers and references the Guide, which it also says is included with your order, and while no Guide came with my order, apparently it is free, but must be requested. Hope this helps.

Answered on 03/13/2012 by BOB KIP

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If you buy the 105b - 1 gallon, You need to then purchase 20zb - .33 gallon. Use ration 3:1 by volume.

Answered on 03/13/2012 by Ryan L

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since it's a 3:1 Resin to hardener ratio, you'd need the .33gal amount of 207 hardener to go with your .98gal Resin. I recommend the pumps that West System sells too as they make mixing the epoxy very simple and efficient.

Answered on 03/13/2012 by RANDALL LEVERE
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Question

does hardener come with the resin

Asked on 04/23/2018 by Dan from Willis, Virginia,24380

Top Answer

Hi Dan, you need to purchase the hardener and the resin, we do sell kits that include both components as well.

Answered on 06/05/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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yes

Answered on 04/23/2018 by scottt505

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No, hardner must be ordered separatly. ###- Please type your reply above this line -### Can you answer Dan's question about this product? WEST System 105 Epoxy Resin "does hardener come with the resin" Simply Reply to this email Thank you in advance if you are able to answer the question. Your email address will not be shared with this customer or other shoppers. We may post your answer to our site to benefit other shoppers. By replying to this email you agree to the privacy Update your preferences Unsubscribe from answering questions about all products

Answered on 04/23/2018 by bobfolks

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The hardener is sold separately. There are different hardeners for different purposes.

Answered on 04/23/2018 by susikkema

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No. You must purchase the hardener separately. There are three to choose temperature.

Answered on 04/23/2018 by okaucheecedar

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Resin sold separate. There is fast and slow set. Get the slow till you get used to it

Answered on 04/23/2018 by tsteele_71
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Question

Is it flexible?

Asked on 06/04/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The resin is quite hard and rigid once cured.

Answered on 06/04/2016 by CECIL HUEY
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Answer

Not to be glib, but flexibility is relative characteristic. Compared to steel or carbon fiber, West System and epoxy in general is flexible. Compared to marine bedding compound or caulks like BoatLife, it is very rigid. If you are looking for a flexible substance, epoxy is probably not what you want. A better flexible adhesive is 3M 5200 or 4200.

Answered on 06/07/2016 by JEFF HUFFENBERGER

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NO! Dries harder than a rock! Very resiliant, but doesn't flex.

Answered on 06/05/2016 by ROGER HINSDALE

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It is not flexible in any usual sense of that word. As a cured solid, without reinforcements, it is considered brittle.

Answered on 06/04/2016 by JAMES LOVE

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no

Answered on 06/04/2016 by WILLIAM CARMICHAEL

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No, very hard.

Answered on 06/04/2016 by DALE ANDERSON
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Question

After mixing the correct proportions, I find that the resin temperature rises extremely fast, causing some cracking. What can I do to prevent this??.

Asked on 04/17/2015 by John van Wyk

Top Answer

Don't mix it in a cup container. Mix it in a flat pan type container (or pour the mix into a pan). A deep cylindrical container magnifies the catalyst. Spreading it out will prevent this. If it is still too hot, you can slow it down by putting it in a water bath. I cut the bottoms off gallon sized poly jugs from glue or windshield washer fluid for my pans (leave a long tab on one side for a handle). They can be cut lengthwise for larger mix applications

Answered on 04/22/2015 by JOHN ATKINS
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Thank you once again, I will certainly look at these suggestions. Take care, have a great weekend

Answered on 04/17/2015 by John van Wyk

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Never had this problem and i use all the time

Answered on 04/17/2015 by BOB BENSON

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John, Glad to help. I'm no expert here; just a long-time amateur working on wooden sailboats (small ones). As for the cracking, perhaps you are trying to use too thick of a coat at time? When I am applying epoxy, I'm usually trying for as thin as possible (using to seal wood). I use the standard West foam rollers. In small areas I may use a little more to fill-in gaps, etc. In this case I may have localized epoxy that could be a 1/8" or even 1/4" thick "pool" but it's a really small area (good heat loss). I do use a lot of thickened epoxy (with Cabosil, etc) and have never had any trouble with cracking even with some really thick applications (but, not thick areas of large surface area). So, another non-expert comment could be to try using multiple coats over the fabric. Read-up on re-coating time but normally if you re-coat in less than about 4 - 6 hours, you don't have to sand (to remove the epoxy blush which happens with some but not all epoxies). Good luck and have a nice weekend.

Answered on 04/17/2015 by ALAN CRAWFORD

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Hi Alan, Thank you for your response.. I will surely look into this. The cracking occurs where there is more resin than fabric, the resin seems to get extremely hot, more so than other areas, THank you once again

Answered on 04/17/2015 by John van Wyk

Answer

I have mixed a lot of West epoxy (different hardeners) and have not experienced your problem. The standard reaction of resin and hardener is exothermic meaning heat is generated. This is standard. One part of your question is confusing. You say "causing some cracking". This implies that the final cured epoxy on your project is cracked? May I suggest the following: 1) What hardener are you using? 205, 206, etc? Each hardener has different characteristics (see info from West) that impacts working time. 2) What is the starting temperature of both resin and hardener? If you are storing the resin and hardener in direct sun or other warmer than ambient place, you may be starting at too warm of temperature. The higher the starting temperature the faster (hotter) the reaction. 3) What size mixing container are you using? For the same volume of resin and hardener, the reaction temperature will be higher as the mixing container diameter decreases. The reason is that with a smaller diameter container there is less heat loss. So, more of the standard heat generated will go to increasing the temperature resulting in shorter working time. 4) Contact West directly by email. They have a good response time.

Answered on 04/17/2015 by ALAN CRAWFORD
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