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Kevlar Cloth - Plain Weave
$36.14In Stock
Plain weave kevlar cloth
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Based on Reviews

Kevlar Cloth - Plain Weave Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 18 Questions

Question

Our boat's bimimi top is getting frayed by the wakesurf rope. Is this fabric something that would work as a patch sewn on top of the present Sumbrella fabric to prevent fraying in the future? Does this come in other colors (black)?

Asked on 03/11/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

No and no. This is plain kevlar, so there is no die or coloring. As plain kevlar it is also susceptible to fraying when subjected repeated abrasion. That being said, if you were to apply some kind of coating as well, say resin or rubber, than this could work well as a patch.

Answered on 03/13/2014 by PAUL LUDWIG
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Answer

thought i just answered this. no. kevlar is a laminating cloth, used in an epoxy resin to provide a virtually puncture proof laminate. I'd suggest a heavy dacron sail cloth sewn over the sunbrella. slippery and tough.

Answered on 03/11/2014 by JOHN MARTIN

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This is a fabric intended for use in lamination, like fiberglass, not as a loose textile like Sunbrella. It won't work for you.

Answered on 03/11/2014 by IAN DUFF

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I doubt this stuff would work well as armor for anything. It's basically structural stuff very loosely woven together, designed for living its life out in a resin matrix. I think you need ballistic nylon or something like that, i.e. Cordura or equivalent.

Answered on 03/11/2014 by STEFAN KING

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in my opinion, kevlar cloth would not be good. it's used in laminates (using an epoxy laminating resin) to provide a bullet-proof laminate --- usually with carbon fiber. if sunbrella isn't working, try a fairly heavy dacron sail cloth.

Answered on 03/11/2014 by JOHN MARTIN
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Question

Does this product have a shelf life?

Asked on 06/07/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

From a laminating/bonding perspective, no. From a storage perspective, yes. It will come loosely folded, unless you buy an entire roll, and will take a set of those folds if left in that state for any length of time, and will not lay flat as a result when you laminate it. You can overcome the fold set by vacuum-bagging or pulling it taut as it cures.

Answered on 06/07/2016 by IAN DUFF
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I don't think so. I've had some cloth for at least 6 months and it's the same as the beginning. I don't know about 10 or 15 year shelf life, but I'll bet it's fine for at least a year.

Answered on 06/07/2016 by JERRY BRENNAN

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It's Kevlar. I wouldn't worry about shelf life; it'll probably last longer than either you or I will.

Answered on 06/08/2016 by Blacksmith Blacksmith
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Question

Will this Kevlar wet out clear like fiberglass or is it yellow?

Asked on 11/17/2013 by Ken Chamberlain

Top Answer

The Kevlar was used for Male Figure Skaters Practice Outfits (Sewn over his thighs and over femoral artery area to prevent ice skate blade from accidentally cutting him during lifts of his partner where she stands on his thighs. We are very happy with the product but can•À_??t answer your specific question.

Answered on 11/17/2013 by DANIEL EATON
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Answer

I was concerned the vendor had to send out this question till I saw the picture....It is yellow and wets out yellow. It is more challenging to use than glass as it tends to float in the resin and fuzz up in sanding, a grinder can be helpful. Special scissors are required to cut it, try to be accurate as it won't feather like glass after you are done. I suggest using it inside a hull skin as it has high strength in tension but low compression strength. It can also wick up water if used outside the hull and the resin barrier is breached.

Answered on 11/18/2013 by CHRIS SHACKLETT

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I used this cloth to encapsulate a sailboat rudder. I used Ameron epoxy (I think it would work fine with West System or any other 'wet' epoxy mix), laying the prepared (cut) fabric out on a table and rolling in epoxy on both sides, after rolling on a heavy coat of epoxy onto the rudder. The farbic is more difficult to wet than fiberglass, but I was looking for the far greater strength. The epoxy I used was grey, so that was the finish color of the repair. Although it is difficult fabric to work with and especially to trim, I was very pleased with the final result. I hope this helps in some way!

Answered on 11/17/2013 by RAOUL MOULINIE
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Question

How hard is it to sew this type of kevlar sheets? Thanks

Asked on 07/31/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

The cloth is extremely soft and could be sewn very easily by hand or by machine.

Answered on 09/02/2012 by YVETTE HORN
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I have not tried but I think it would not present the difficulties that sewing an equivalent weight of tightly woven sailcloth does, just because the weave is relatively loose. One thing that might be a problem would be the drive feet, again because the weave is loose. You might need to feed carefully... S.

Answered on 08/02/2012 by STEFAN KING

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It can be done. Frays easily though so you need to use a backing and do something with the edges.

Answered on 08/02/2012 by PAUL LUDWIG
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Question

What type of kevlar is this?

Asked on 05/26/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It is grade 49 Kevlar, I don't think grade 29 is available publicly.

Answered on 05/30/2012 by IAN MCCLURE
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This is a good question that composite builders should know. Kevlar comes in several grades, there is Kevlar 29, Kevlar 49 and Kevlar 149 from weakest to strongest. The 29 is roughly equal to E or S glass in strength but is much lighter. The 49 and 149 are much stronger. Most Kevlar cloth is Kevlar 49, the excellent staff at Jamestown should be able to tell you what they are selling and add the information to the catalog.

Answered on 05/30/2012 by CHRIS SHACKLETT

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I am not sure what you mean. It is just ordinary kevlar.

Answered on 05/30/2012 by PAUL LUDWIG
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Question

After this is cured with epoxy is it possible to use a router on it? If yes then do I need a special router bit?

Asked on 03/01/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Sorry. I honestly do not know! Raoul

Answered on 04/10/2012 by RAOUL MOULINIE
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Answer

Routers are good, plain bits are fine; the material is not as hard as glass, so steel bits are ok. The problem is the strength and resilience of kevlar; it is difficult to get a fuzz-free edge because the fibers tend not to shear off clean the way carbon or glass would. For least fuzzing, I would recommend getting the epoxy thoroughly cured, use the highest possible speed, and use a really sharp bit. Cheers.

Answered on 04/29/2012 by STEFAN KING

Answer

Finishing kevlar is very tricky. We trim with a band saw,make a final shape cut with conventional wood cutting router bit, and then wet grind the edge. In my experience wet grinding is the only way to produce a useable finished edge. The best results are typically obtained by cutting the kevlar smaller than the final dimensions of the product. If you wish to use a router bit specific to kevlar, talk with your Onsrud rep. They may have a good solution.

Answered on 03/01/2012 by SEAN MARTIN
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Question

Will this sheet recover, for example if it were used to cover an archery tartget, would it spring back after the arrows are pulled out of the target/sheet? Not expecting the sheet to stop the arrows, just to provide a nice surface for an old target. Thanks

Asked on 01/13/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

It is possible. A really sharp arrow would cut the fabric, and after too much use, you would probably need to lay the whole sheet out flat for it to recover, but I think it would work for an archery target.

Answered on 01/30/2012 by PAUL LUDWIG
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Sorry, I am not sure. We bought the product for another application.

Answered on 02/20/2012 by JILL MILLHOUSE

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I doubt it. But I suspect there are other problems. For instance, Kevlar's darned hard to cut and when you do cut it with normal scissors, you cut it by bunching and crushing and then severing the strands. I'm sure there are more appropriate and far cheaper alternatives.

Answered on 02/24/2012 by JOHN MARTIN
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Question

what's the difference between the 58" per yard kevlar cloth and the 36" per yard kevlar cloth?

Asked on 11/11/2014 by dave masner

Top Answer

The one is 58" inches wide and the other is 36" wide. No other difference.

Answered on 11/11/2014 by PAUL LUDWIG
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The width. Most fabrics come in a set width, then measured by the yard for length. So a 36" by 4 yrd piece of fabric would have the dimensions of 3'x12'.

Answered on 11/11/2014 by ARON MATUSHENKO
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Question

I am looking for hardened sheets of Kevlar in the following thicknesses? .75 mm, 1.00 mm, & 1.25 mm.

Asked on 07/25/2013 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

This is a soft woven Kevlar fabric.

Answered on 07/25/2013 by ARON MATUSHENKO
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Answer

I have not used Kevlar sheet. Thicker Kevlar sheets are available for ballistic protection (web search). I would contact DuPont, the technical there may be able to suggest ways to reduce thickness (Hot press??.) Good luck.

Answered on 07/25/2013 by SUNITY SHARMA
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Question

Will this Kevlar be able to withstand the sharp edge of a snowboard without adding anything such as resin or apoxy to it?

Asked on 02/20/2013 by Billy Conte

Top Answer

No. This kevlar is impossible to break or tear, but it can be cut relatively easily with anything sharp. You should definitely use apoxy or resin if it is going to be in contact with the sharp edge of a snow board. Even if the snowboard didn't cut it right away, any repeated abrasion would quickly wear through the kevlar. Hope this helps.

Answered on 02/24/2013 by PAUL LUDWIG
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Probably not, and the water from the snow will over time damage the kevlar to the point of structural integrity failure. If you still want to use the kevlar with it, stay away from polyester resin which does not do well with kevlar or high stress.

Answered on 02/20/2013 by IAN MCCLURE
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