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G10 Fiberglass Board Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 16 Questions

Question

What is the machinability of this material. Milling and drilling to be specific?

Asked on 03/05/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Machinability of this material is excellent. It work well for milling and drilling. It will dull bits as it s extremely hard.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by PHILLLIP BRASSINGTON
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It mills beautifully, drilling is easy. The only issue to be aware of is the dust. Wear masks and avoid contact with skin. You will itch for days if you get the dust on your person. Particularly in summer or if you are sweating, keep it off your skin. For cutting, I have found that bi-metal blades work best. It will blunt everything else pretty quickly. Use a slow feed rate.

Answered on 03/06/2015 by GREG SMITH

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I am no expert, and not even a professional. I used a diamond/carbide table saw blade to cut it. For thicker pieces, I cut it in several places. I bought the saw blade online for about half a c note. I just bought two more as I've already wore it out, (I cut some that was ¥Ë_¥Ë__" that I bought from another source as Jamestown didn't have that size). Same thing on drill bits, use carbide. Anything designed to cut metal should work. It is hard on equipment. It is also hard on you! Wear a Tyvek suit, full face mask respirator with proper filters, and don't eat or drink while working with it. Shower immediately, taking your clothes off outside, shaking them out and straight into the wash. The dust from it must be harmful, as its ground glass after all, not to mention the chemicals. It's worth it though. It is an awesome material! Good luck!

Answered on 03/05/2015 by JIMMY STEWART

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As an epoxy based material it is easily machined and I have seen it tapped and threaded as well. I personally have not done so however, and have used it extensively as backing plates for deck hardware, whereby it is through bolted and to make up brackets and platforms for pumps and ER equipment. In one case I used a ss threaded insert bedded into the G10 with West Flex instead of a bolt.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by shawn beqaj

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Drilling is about the same as drilling through any fiberglass, faster and easier than aluminum, but slower than wood. I've only drilled holes but I'm sure cutting is the same, just make sure your bits or blade is sharp.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by PATRICK TORRE

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Easy to work with. Had no problems cutting, sanding or drilling.

Answered on 03/06/2015 by Dana Allen

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Jamestown does carry ¥Ë_¥Ë__" I now see.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by JIMMY STEWART

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Drilling and sawing just like any hard, hard plastic. It's possible with sharp tools, but it will take it's toll on regular non-carbide tipped bits and blades. I imagine milling is the same way.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by Mark Brodesser

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I used the board as a backing plate for deck hardware. I used thickened epoxy to glue it in place and covered it with fiberglass cloth. I did not have to machine it but drilling through it worked just fine with a normal drill bit.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by RICHARD STULEN

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Easily drilled and I also used a router on the edges so I assume that milling should not be an issue either.

Answered on 03/05/2015 by THOMAS MACKEY
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Question

can i use this for the floor? i have a 20ft glass pro.

Asked on 01/25/2015 by Brutie Fatso

Top Answer

I used 1/4" G10 to repair the fore-triangle deck of my sailboat. Used to be 1/2" plywood cored. So yes, I would say you can use it for the floor/deck of a boat. It is heavy. It can not be bent to a curve/shape. Coosa Board is a lighter product. If you are replacing the core of a floor/deck, and you are going to do fiberglass layup on top and bottom, Coosa may be a better answer.

Answered on 01/26/2015 by Stephen Howard
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Bought this for a fellow sailor so don't know his experience

Answered on 01/26/2015 by DAN BAIR

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I used pre-cut pieces as backing plates for decj stanchion bases. I assume you asking about replacing a marine plywood floor with G10 - yes, it will last forever but is expensive and dificlut to cut.

Answered on 01/29/2015 by SCOTT DAGGETT

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I purchased two small pieces of the material to use as a support for hiking straps to pass under on a small open sailboat. The material is very strong, but I could not comment on using it for a floor.

Answered on 01/26/2015 by JOHN KOEDEL

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The G10 is extremely strong and rigid. It is not very flexible. Basically think of a sheet of glass that won't break or shatter. It is a little hard to cut and drill, but for the right application it is amazing stuff. Also quite heavy for its size, and slick. It is easy to glass in place. I used it for smaller structural pieces and backing plates.

Answered on 01/26/2015 by RANDOLPH HEMSATH

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Yes, but it will be an expensive solution, depending on how big the floor is. It may require additional reinforcement to make it stiff enough, depending on the configuration and span of area. Remember that this is an epoxy laminate, so you will need to use epoxy resins and compatible reinforcement when bonding it into a fiberglass laminate boat hull.

Answered on 01/26/2015 by nick the boatbuilder nick the boatbuilde

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The stuff is very strong. I'm no expert but I think that it would work very well as a floor.

Answered on 01/26/2015 by CHUCK BARTLETT
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Question

Can G 10 board be used as backing plates on the underside of a swim step where there will be regular contact with salt water. Purpose is as backing plates for davit hardware mounted on swim step. Am looking for alternative to aluminum plates.

Asked on 03/23/2018 by New to powerboats from San Juan Islands

Top Answer

G10 plates work out great as backing plates for hardware, and it will not corrode from oxidation either.

Answered on 05/29/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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Good idea! You can thread the G 10 and use that as a additional strength. Add a nylon lock nut for insurance but you have to make sure the bolt does not spin. Good luck. Bruce Sent from my iPhone

Answered on 03/23/2018 by brucemmacneil

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G10 will work great in this application. The problem will be the stainless hardware.

Answered on 03/24/2018 by stumble

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Yes, absolutely. Just be sure to use appropriate hardware and sealant.

Answered on 03/27/2018 by david_trant

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Yes

Answered on 03/23/2018 by mwdef
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Question

hi people. im looking for the name of a product. that is like some kind of styrofoam fiber board. That you can form and apply resin or glass to acheve its hardend??????

Asked on 08/04/2015 by viktor Last Name

Top Answer

Not sure what that might be, but this is not it. This is rock hard and inflexible from the get-go.

Answered on 08/05/2015 by DAN BARRETT
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Divinycell issued for coring hulls. Very strong, can be shaped easily. Coosa Board is much lighter than G10 and is used for flat structural elements like coring a deck. It can be sanded to a curve, but otherwise is rigid.

Answered on 08/04/2015 by Stephen Howard

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You are looking for divinicell or core foam. G-10 is a mutilayered fiberglass that is cured, and can be used for backing plates or structurallly

Answered on 08/05/2015 by IAN PARKER

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I bought this as a backing "plate" for cleats etc. It is extremely hard with little or no compression. I have been able to cut/saw it and sand it. However I think it would be a difficult product to "shape".

Answered on 08/04/2015 by SCOTT WEKER

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G 10 is rigid and very strong. It is not "formable". I used it as backing plate to re enforce the hull to mount dinghy davits.

Answered on 08/04/2015 by Anne Nesterak
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I'm re-doing the chainplates and knees on my Tayana 37. I was considering using G10 as backibf plates instead of the original wood knees to spread the load to the inside of the hull, but I see where G10 has the same density as starboard. Starboad is easier to work with (cutting and shaping) than G10. Has anybody used Starboard for this application before, or have any suggestions pro or con for using starboard instead of G10?

Asked on 03/09/2014 by Jim H

Top Answer

Starboard is a better choice than G10 for this application. It is less stiff, so it can adapt to the curvature, if any, of the metal pieces. I am not sure about the long-term creep of the plastic under heavy compressive load, but I suspect it is no worse than soaked plywood.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by DAVID LUCE
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Starboard is substantially more flexible and has less structural stability than G10. It is best used where UV radiation can attack the plastic, and where the mechanical requirements are less important than the decorative features of the smooth white color. For backing plates, G-10, at least 3/8 inch thick,would be a reasonable substitute for 1/4 inch aluminum; it could be tapped with National Coarse threads to hold the inner end of machine screws; it is extremely resistant to corrosion, and will not facilitate galvanic interaction with the metals.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by DAVID LUCE

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I don't know why the statement about the density being the same was made, the two materials have little in common. Starboard is fairly heavy per volume and so is the G10, but the Starboard is much softer and not nearly as stiff. You can flex 1/4" Starboard, but barely can with G10. You also can't glass to Starboard, whereas it is easy to use Epoxy on the fiberglass sheets. Basically G10 is a well made, very uniform fiberglass sheet with a high glass to resin ratio. It is expensive, it will make a good backing plate, but is not as stiff as say stainless. They do make 1/2" G10 but it is very expensive. g10 is much harder to drill and cut than Starboard, yet with the right tools it is pretty easy.

Answered on 03/10/2014 by RANDOLPH HEMSATH

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Thanks David ...Good advice, but I think I probably misrepresented what I was planning. Instead of "backing plates" I should have explained that the starboard would be used as a 5" X 15" spacer between the inner hull and the actual 2" wide SS backing plates. It would be used to spread the load against the inner hull from the external chainplates. The original design used wood spacers encapsulated in epoxy and covered over with glass cloth --allowing the wood to eventually become soaked and rot unnoticed over 30 years. I plan to cut all that and replace with either G10 or starboard (which would be easier to work with). Sound like a good plan? Jim

Answered on 03/10/2014 by Jim H
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Question

How much does a 12"x12" piece of 1/4" G10 weigh?

Asked on 12/03/2014 by Doug Kinzer

Top Answer

As I used G10 for backing plates for stanchions, I wasn't concerned about weight. I can say, though, for this application, G10 is an outstanding choice. Its density makes it ideal for this. It will not rot if wet and is strong. Though I didn't weigh them, I can't imagine that they weigh a pound, if that. Mike Meier

Answered on 12/03/2014 by MICHAEL MEIER
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approximately 2.43 lb, or 1.1 kg.

Answered on 12/03/2014 by nick the boatbuilder nick the boatbuilde

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Thanks for the quick reply, Lester. G10 is lighter than 1/4 aluminum, which is good. :)

Answered on 12/03/2014 by Doug Kinzer
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I'm looking for the best material for a deck repair at the shroud chain plate. I had to remove a 6x10" section where the original balsa cored deck failed. I'm considering laminating 2 layers of 1/4" G-10, which I have purchased already, in between layers of 1708 E-glass. Will the 2 layers of G-10 bond together and to the E-glass well? What surface prep does the G-10 need before applying the epoxy? Should I laminate the layers of G-10 first then laminate the assembly into the repair area to allow for adequate clamping of the layers of G-10?

Asked on 10/13/2014 by Todd Duffett

Top Answer

I think the material probably would bond OK, and I love it as hardware backing plates, but I'm not sure that's the technique you should use for your repair. Balsa is very effective when done right and isolated from water, and you can get it from Jamestown, which is where I got mine. Consider the PDF article you'll find by Googling "west system EPOXYWORKS Number 19, Spring 2002". It sounds like you and he faced nearly identical problems. Note the author's comment that it's not a good idea to change character of the core. Following his instructions, I re-cored almost all of my 60" X 24" afterdeck with 3/8" balsa. It had been so wet inside for so long that it was almost soupy in there, and it was flexing over half an inch under load. I removed everything down to the bottom skin and built it back up using the above article and other info I found by Googling "west system publications". It's now as hard as a rock, and except for the bonded hardware with G-10 backing plates, it's 100% balsa core. Best of luck!

Answered on 10/15/2014 by DAN BARRETT
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Not a structural engineer so this is not engineering advice: G10 will bond nicely to E glass, just need to scuff the surface up first (I use 40/60 grit to prep my surfaces before bonding). I call the prep done when the surface isn't shiny. No need to use acetone which may introduce its own impurities. Just your dirty/oily fingers off it once you've done the surface prep. Up to your construction method as to whether you want to join the 2 G10 layers together first, but will say that you don't need to crank up the clamping force for epoxy, its not resorcinol. Just need to sustain contact between the two surfaces while the epoxy is curing. If the G10 isn't warped (and it shouldn't be) you could just wipe epoxy on the bottom piece, put the top piece on, put a big picture book on it and wait for it to cure (don't forget to wipe off excess if some squeezed out the sides). One last thing - you may have already considered this. The G10 stack will be very strong, the limiting factor will likely be how you can transmit the force on the G10 to the surrounding area. So have a think about the surrounding laminate layup, the G10 won't do any good if the entire G10 piece gets ripped out because the fibreglass attaching it to the structure is not strong enough.

Answered on 10/13/2014 by KAI YUM

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Thank you for the feedback. The G10 will be captured by 3 of the lead car screws for the #3 genoa which should help to keep it from moving laterally. I was contemplating adding some 1/4-20 machine screws through the deck skins to which it is being bonded and into drilled and tapped holes in the G10 outboard of the chain plate to further distribute the shear loads.

Answered on 10/13/2014 by Todd Duffett
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Question

Will a foot wide strip of 1/4" G10 bend 1" over 3'? Or is G10 too stiff?

Asked on 06/13/2016 by Arthur S.

Top Answer

No. Way to stiff

Answered on 06/13/2016 by STEPHEN NORTH
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I would be very surprised if it would bend, even more surprised if it would stay bent.

Answered on 06/14/2016 by DAN BARRETT
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Question

do you have 5/8" think G10 board 36" x 48"?

Asked on 02/26/2015 by joe cacciola

Top Answer

The thickest we have is 1/2".

Answered on 02/26/2015 by Rick White
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I used 2" by 4" pieces as backer plates and they worked just fine. I am sure you have different use for it however.

Answered on 02/28/2015 by JOHN KOEDEL
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Question

Would 1 1/4 x 2x3 at each end of a grab handle be strong enough?

Asked on 06/18/2018 by Jack from Sandwich, Mass

Top Answer

We can not answer that without more details of your application. Please call one of our techs at (800) 497-0010 to provide some more details and help answer this question more accurately.

Answered on 06/27/2018 by JD Tech Associate
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