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Shieldsflex II Marine Water and Exhaust Hose
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Shieldsflex II Marine Water and Exhaust Hose Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 18 Questions

Question

What is the bend radius of the one and a half inch wire hose?

Asked on 09/28/2011 by Ray A

Top Answer

Ray, I don't know of a specific bend radius. However, as the hose is wire reinforced, it won't collapse even with a severe radius in it. I have used it with some pretty tight bends and not had any problems with it. Jim

Answered on 09/28/2011 by JAMES ALBANI
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I'm not at the boat, but it did 'collapse' a little when I tried to force it in some fairly tight radii. Off the top of my head, I'd say 6" or more is probably good. But it will also depend on the length of the arc -- a slight 6" radius bend for 15 degrees is easier than a 6" radius bend that turns through 90 degrees. I was trying to put an "S" in about a 14" length and I'd say it didn't make two 4" radii very well. Although a tight fit, the partial 'collapse' (the wall kind of flattened) wasn't a problem for a 9 hp diesel.

Answered on 09/28/2011 by Dave Dave

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I used it in an engine compartment to replace some cracked hoses on my westerbeke generator, I would say it's pretty flexable with about a foot (12") radius of bend, we had no trouble bending and flexing it to install, very high quality hose and made in USA

Answered on 09/29/2011 by GARY HAMM

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Thanks for the reply Don. I think it will work out OK for me. I just about to order some.

Answered on 10/03/2011 by Ray A

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Thanks Tom. Ray

Answered on 09/29/2011 by Ray A

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Thank you Gary. Ray

Answered on 09/29/2011 by Ray A

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Ray, I couldn't tell you, but the radius is fairly large. On my installation I used one fiberglass 90 degree ell and one 45 degree ell and the installation was very clean. I have some slight bends in the hose but for anything abrubt I would recommend using an ell fitting. - Bob

Answered on 09/28/2011 by GAY BOYNTON

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Hi, Ray! This hose is rather stiff because of the composition of the hose and the wire that's impregnated in it...I'm not sure that I can give you an answer as to the exact bend radius, but I would not try more than a 90 degree bend unless the fittings the hose goes on are more than 18 inches apart. Also, because of its stiffness, it can be difficult to get over fittings, as it doesn't have much expandibility. However, it works great once you get it in place. Hope this answers your question! Don Kinney

Answered on 10/03/2011 by DON KINNEY

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I used the water hose and would estimate the bend radius at about 12 inches, although I never had need to bend it sharper than that. The box for the 50 feet of hose is about 24 x 24 x 30. -Tom

Answered on 09/29/2011 by THOMAS KOEHL

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Thanks Jim, I only need a 5 or 6 inch radius so think this will work great for me. Ray

Answered on 09/28/2011 by Ray A
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Question

Can this hose be cut to length?

Asked on 10/15/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes, easily. The smaller size can be cut with a sharp knife or utility knife and the larger sizes are easier to cut with a hand saw. The spiral wire is then snipped with a wire cuter after cutting around 360 degrees. It is smart to then trim the wire end short as possible and bend the end inward to avoid cutting your hand later. It is not easy to estimate the best length if you are dealing with large bends. Make it a little longer as a first guess and trim it back later. Remember, 2 hose clamps on each end, so overlap the pipe accordingly.

Answered on 10/16/2015 by ROBERT UTZ
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Yes

Answered on 10/15/2015 by MICHAEL YANCEY

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yes,it can be cut,you will need a good hose cutter and a wire cutter. This hose is reinforced with a wire on the inside so after you cut the hose you will need to cut the wire. this is a very good hose and very easy to cut to any length.

Answered on 10/16/2015 by JESUS PICAYO

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Yes, I was able to cut the hose to properly fit.

Answered on 10/15/2015 by RONALD JACK

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Yes it cuts easily with a utility knife. I think you also may need a pair of wire cutters also.

Answered on 10/18/2015 by MICHAEL BLAKE

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i bought this back in June - I used a hacksaw to cut to length - easy to cut through the rubber housing. I used tin snips to cut the wire core - but could have also used the hacksaw here.

Answered on 10/16/2015 by STEVE BRANTLEY

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Can be cut with good hose cutter and sharp wire cutters.

Answered on 10/16/2015 by ORIN GUIDRY

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You have to buy he minimum lengths that are offered, then cut them yourself to your specific length. Use a Hack saw then wire cutters or dremmel for the wire reinforcement

Answered on 10/16/2015 by Charles Berger

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Yes, no problem. You could run masking tape around to follow for a straight cut. Also it is recomended to double clamp in a marine application. Thanks Bill

Answered on 10/16/2015 by BILL BECK

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Yes, use a fine blade hack saw first and a good wire cutter to cut the internal reinforcement wire. Note: Pull the wire out of the hose slightly when cutting to prevent sharp edges when reinstalling.

Answered on 10/16/2015 by KEITH W. FIELDER
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Question

How well does the Shieldsflex II marine water and exhaust hose work on marine toilet holding tank pumpout lines and how long will it provide odor free service before it needs to be replaced?

Asked on 06/07/2012 by George Kalan

Top Answer

use designated waste water hose. The rubber in Shieldsflex will eventually exude the sewer gasses and your bilge and next your whole boat will stink. Check out Practical Sailor waste water hose comparisons. Be careful fitting metric to inch fittings.

Answered on 06/10/2012 by ERIC RODEGAST
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I would not use this particular hose for holding tank applications. I purchased this hose raw water feeds to livewells. It would be also good for raw water cooling, etc. Trust me when I tell you, I replaced my holding tank hoses due to odor permeation and you want to do that job once. Buy the best low odor permeation sanitation hose you can afford. They are usually white. The one I bought was trident 101.

Answered on 06/08/2012 by THOMAS DALFONSO

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Hose is Oder free for the third year I've had it. Only downside is if you need to make a tight radius turn.

Answered on 06/09/2012 by ANDY SCHWINN

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For head and holding tank you should use the white sanitary hose. It's easy to cut to work with.

Answered on 06/08/2012 by JOHN MACKAY

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Hi, George... I don't know well it will work on toilet and holding tanks, I used it on exhaust/water for the diesel in my sailboat. It's a pretty high-performance hose, though, so I'd think that it would perform as well or better than any other hose. Sorry I couldn't give you a more specific answer. Don Kinneyh

Answered on 06/08/2012 by DON KINNEY

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I re read this and realized you asked about the exhaust hose for toilet. I would only use the green line hose for toilet. It's more money but worth it.

Answered on 06/09/2012 by ANDY SCHWINN
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Question

I am replacing a hose labeled "Shildsflex 2 3/8" premium water hose" on a green spiral. It is used in a wet exhaust system. Does the label refer to id or od and what would be the equivalent?

Asked on 10/11/2011 by Paul Zadel

Top Answer

The size marked on the hose should be the ID of the hose.

Answered on 10/12/2011 by JOHN MACKAY
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In the case of measuring the wire wound hose it is best to average two measurements taken 90 degree's to each other ( + ) as the wire will deform the end of the hose. In the case of a piece of 1 7/8" hose I replaced, one measurement read an 1/8 to a 1/16th smaller and the other read larger by about the same dimension. In conventional hose a difference of 1/8" is no big deal you can force it on. With this hose 1/8" is a no go.

Answered on 10/11/2011 by MICHAEL SNYDER

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Paul, The label on the hose is referencing Internal Diameter. So in this case you would be replacing it with Jamestown part # SHI-2502384.

Answered on 10/11/2011 by MICHAEL SNYDER

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the main problems I found with hoses and whatever they will be connected to was that some were metric and others were inch and fractions. they can give you a fit trying to connect them, especially the heavy exhaust parts(Shields to Vetus for example) as far as I know, all hose and pipe is sized ID, although some hoses specify both ID and OD.

Answered on 10/12/2011 by ERIC RODEGAST

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Since different materials of different thicknesses are used by different manufacturers, most always the dimension is ID since that is a constant. RE: the "green stripe": I don't beleive green stripe is USCG certified for wet exhaust . Or possibly it is just older and different manufacturer. I suppose it doesn't matter since you are replacing it with "ShieldsFlex" wet exhaust service application which I beleive is "blue stripe". The service application should be clearly labeled in or next to the stripe as well.

Answered on 10/12/2011 by FILLMORE CRANK

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Paul, The label should be referring to the inside diameter, or ID. When ordering the product, click on the drop-down menu and they all say "ID". To be doubly sure, take a cross section of your old hose and measure the ID. Excellent product. I used it to replace a hose that runs between my V-drive and raw water impeller. Super strong stuff, yet pliable and bendable enough. Hope that helps!

Answered on 10/11/2011 by Guest Guest
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Question

When tightening hose clamps, what is considered tight? i don't want to over tighten and premature the life expectancy of the hoses.

Asked on 09/08/2012 by J Setliff

Top Answer

Hose clamp manufacturers give torque figures for their products. They also recommend two clamps for wet exhaust connections.

Answered on 09/16/2012 by JOHN A CALOGERO
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Hi, JS... Based on the strength of this hose, I don't think that you could tighten it enough with a standard clamp to injure it, I think that the clamp would break first. To install, I just make sure that there's plenty of hose past the anti-slip rings, then install one clamp with the screw on one side of the hose facing you, then another clamp just above it with a screw on the other side, also facing you. Tighten each a little at a time until they're totally secure and tight, but stop before the screw on the clamp starts deforming the slots in the clamps...and you're good to go!

Answered on 09/12/2012 by DON KINNEY

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First, ensure you are using high quality, marine grade hose clamps and use 2 clamps on any connection below the water line. I tighten clamp until the metal strap is imbedded in the hose outer layer. In other words, the rubber outer layer of the hose should be just raised above the top of the hose band and the adjusting screw should be firm or tight. The fitting should be barbed so if you snug it up tight, it won't come off or damage the hose.

Answered on 09/12/2012 by GERALD HARWOOD

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Tighten the clamps a little more than hand tight. After and hour of use, check clamps again. Check again after 10 hours of use

Answered on 09/12/2012 by DAVID ANDERSON

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I would tighten enough that the clamp just starts to settle on the hose. Give the hose a tug and twist, if it moves on the fitting, tighten a bit more. All you are after is a seal, after that you are just stressing the hose.

Answered on 09/13/2012 by JULIE WAGNER
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Question

What is the temperature rating on the 4" exhaust hose?

Asked on 07/27/2016 by DON MARCELINO

Top Answer

I don't pretend to be an expert on Shieldsflex Marine hose. There were no temp specs printed on hose. I found the manufacturer's specs. Google "seastarsolutions". Sheilds is a division of this company.

Answered on 07/27/2016 by BRIAN SCHANNING
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max temp shorty duration...250 degrees F.

Answered on 08/03/2016 by JAMES TIDMORE

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thank you

Answered on 07/28/2016 by DON MARCELINO

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The temperature ranges from -20¥Ë_¥Ë_¥Ë_ F ’¢?? +200¥Ë_¥Ë_¥Ë_F continuous, +250¥Ë_¥Ë_¥Ë_F intermittent.

Answered on 07/27/2016 by Rick White
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Question

Is this good for cockpit drain lines that go out at the waterline?

Asked on 06/13/2016 by DON MARCELINO

Top Answer

It would probably be overkill for cockpit drainlines, but yes it would work. I would imagine that standard rubber hoses would be fine for your application.

Answered on 06/13/2016 by DANIEL GRAVELLE
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It certainly works for waterline and below. I think it would be overkill though for through hulls slightly above waterline.

Answered on 07/27/2016 by BRIAN SCHANNING

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It may looks like an overkill, but this hose very flexible, works great as deck and cockpit drain lines on our boat and will last forever.

Answered on 06/13/2016 by SERGUEI CHESTOPALOV
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Question

Can this product be used in a raw water cooling system application for a USCG inspected "T" vessel of 100 tons?

Asked on 03/26/2015 by WILLIAM WHITNEY

Top Answer

Yes this can I used it on my charter boat, ordered it for the intake on my john Deere. Great product. As long as you use a wire insert your fine. Good luck,

Answered on 03/26/2015 by KEVIN BREEN
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I was not aware of that change, I have more than 30 inches. Of hose on my intake, will be getting insurance inspection soon, will see if he catches it. Thanks for that f.y.o. Kevin

Answered on 03/26/2015 by KEVIN BREEN

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Kevin, That's what I thought also. The USCG seems to be changing the rules though. If you look at Chapter "T" 46 CFR 182.710 the raw water system is classified as a vital system in 46CFR 182.710(a)(6). it states that piping for vital systems must be composed of ferrous materials except when non-metallic piping materials are permitted by 182.720 (SAE standard J-1942 with SAE standard J-1475 end fittings). Short lengths (30 inches) of approved non-metallic hoses (J-1942) are permitted when fixed by two hose clamps at each end of the hose under 46CFR182.422(d) and 182.720(e)(3)(v). Are you aware this change? Do you know we can comply without using that very expensive J-1942 compliant hose? Capt. Bill

Answered on 03/26/2015 by WILLIAM WHITNEY
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Question

Is this hose good for cockpit drains?

Asked on 01/10/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yeah, but I wouldn't use it for that. This is wire reinforced, doesn't like sharp bends and is made for exhaust. Very, very durable but its overkill and expensive. I would think there are better hoses than this for your application.

Answered on 01/10/2014 by GAY BOYNTON
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It would work, but would be pretty serious overkill in my opinion. I wouldn't spend the money unless you think you might have some solvents or other corrosives (that might compromise lighter hose) draining through the drains. It'll have a fairly large turn radius as well - might be an issue - as the hose is substantial

Answered on 01/13/2014 by BARRY CUNNINGHAM

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Yes; however there is less expensive and easier to work with hose that I would use if you don't need the temperature rating of this product.

Answered on 01/10/2014 by PAUL BLANOS
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Question

what is the best way to cut this hose to size ?

Asked on 06/12/2016 by Robert S

Top Answer

Robert U's procedure is absolutely correct.

Answered on 08/03/2016 by JAMES TIDMORE
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Use a utility knife to cut around 360 degrees at your mark and then a wire cutter to snip the internal support wire. Bend the end of the wire in so you are not cut when handling. Easy!

Answered on 06/12/2016 by ROBERT UTZ
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