Free shipping on orders over $99.99! Don't miss out!
$33.99 In Stock
TotalBoat Penetrating Epoxy Kits
$33.99In Stock
TotalBoat Penetrating Epoxy Gallon Kit
Ask a Question
4.6
Based on 181 Reviews
  • 5 Star

    74%

  • 4 Star

    16%

  • 3 Star

    6%

  • 2 Star

    3%

  • 1 Star

    2%

TotalBoat Penetrating Epoxy Kits Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 130 Questions

Question

I have two badly weathered vertical Sampson posts with many fine and a couple larger cracks up to 1/8" wide (all vertically oriented). Should I squirt penetrating epoxy into them and clean up what runs out and then use regular thickened epoxy on the larger cracks or just use regular epoxy to begin with?

Asked on 04/04/2018 by Richard from undisclosed

Top Answer

Hi Richard, the penetrating epoxy will help to reinforce the fibers, but if the cracks are big, the thickened epoxy is going to be your friend on this one for sure. I would definitely try and clean up the cracks and the outer surface and remove any loose fibers or weak grain so that what you do reinforce is more solid. You could do a coat or two of thinned penetrating epoxy to seal the posts. I would still keep a close eye on the posts even after you epoxy them.

Answered on 06/01/2018 by JD Tech Associate
See More Answers (7)

Answer

Don The penetrating epoxy will definitely get into those fine cracks - especially if you thin it with denatured alcohol. 2:1 Resin/Hardener mixture and another 1 of alcohol. Probably do a good job sealing the larger cracks as well. Old wood just sucks it right in. Maybe follow up with full strength and then hit the larger cracks with the regular epoxy. Hope that helps.

Answered on 04/04/2018 by keybizsol

Answer

The penetrating sounds like the best plan, then followed up with thickened.

Answered on 04/04/2018 by stevegravely

Answer

That's what I would do. You might want to close the larger cracks with a clamp, IF it doesn't distort the shape of the S. Post. Jerry

Answered on 04/05/2018 by gtmu22

Answer

You could use penetrating epoxy, but I would use 5:1 epoxy, first coat unthickened to saturate, then, before it kicks, slightly thickened with colloidal silica to fill the voids. Then use hose clamps and wedges to squeeze the posts together until the epoxy cures. You could clamp with a Spanish windlass and wedges as well.

Answered on 04/04/2018 by phrabchak

Answer

I have used the penetrating epoxy extensively to preserve outdoor furniture. It is very runny stuff. Almost water like. I would stick with regular epoxy. If your posts are painted I would recommend Total Boat Total fair tairing compound. I have used that with great success on outdoor woodwork to fill cracks like you have. Best of luck Ian

Answered on 04/04/2018 by ianschwandt

Answer

I would use regular epoxy to begin with and just thin it a little.

Answered on 04/04/2018 by glenndavis171

Answer

I have learned a lot about Penetrating Epoxy. Any old wood that I am repairing I will try my best to introduce Penetrating Epoxy to the project.

Answered on 04/04/2018 by mfdeye
Answer Question

Question

Question One: Can a staining/sealer be applied prior to application of TotalBoat Epoxy? Question Two: How many layers of this epoxy are put on? Question Three: Why would a varnish be applied over this epoxy? Many thans, Bill Winstanley

Asked on 09/10/2015 by Bill Winstanley

Top Answer

I don't have any direct experience with the procedure, but I checked a forum I look at regularly called "Wooden Boat People." I did a search for the term "epoxy over stain." Almost all of the respondents said that they had had good luck with epoxy over water-based stains. I do know that epoxy does not like to bond to wood treated with linseed oil, for example. I think epoxy coating a door is a great idea, by the way. Good luck.

Answered on 09/11/2015 by JONATHAN JACOBS
See More Answers (7)

Answer

Best results are achieved when the wood is not stained. In my experience, if you want to make sure the wood is fully penetrated, keep adding additional coats until the wood looks almost like it has a finish on it. Epoxy itself does not have any UV blocking properties, while many good varnishes have UV blockers in them. This helps protect both the epoxy and the color of the wood under it.

Answered on 09/11/2015 by JONATHAN JACOBS

Answer

I may not be the person to best answer this, but I would assume the sealer would prevent complete penetration of the mixture. I've applied several layers some in succession and some after the prior application dried. As a woodturner I am able to apply this product on wood that is 1/4 to 1 inch thick. I invert the bowl on a platform and pull a vacuum with a shop vac, I apply the mixture until I have full penetration. I'm not sure why you want to apply a varnish but I have used Tung Oil and Polyurethane when I was satisfied with the finished surface.

Answered on 09/10/2015 by LOUIS RUDINSKI

Answer

Thank you, Jonathan for your response, however I want to stain the front door of my house, and I wonder if I should use a water-based stain as opposed to a stain/sealer such as is used on floors. Have you any comments on that subject? Many thanks for your help. Bill

Answered on 09/11/2015 by Bill Winstanley

Answer

Thank you all for all your help, and Jamestown Distributers for this forum. Best Wishes, Bill

Answered on 09/11/2015 by Bill Winstanley

Answer

1) A stain can be applied but must not be based in another carrier such as oil, varnish, etc. check with manufacturer's directions regarding epoxy before applying 2). One layer of penetrating is enough. Regular epoxy can be applied next 3). Ultraviolet protective varnish is applied over epoxy to prevent degradation of epoxy and hopefully preservation of color of underlying wood. None are perfect in my limited experience

Answered on 09/10/2015 by DAVID KAPPEL

Answer

#1 I would think applying anything that would impede the product's ability to penetrate the wood fibers you want to preserve would be counter productive. #2 The number of coats depends totally on how much the wood absorbs. Generally, two coats are plenty. #3 Varnish is applied to provide UV protection for the epoxy. Epoxy materials are not happy in the sun if unprotected.

Answered on 09/10/2015 by JERRY DILLINGER

Answer

Hi Bill, I'm not sure about #1 but I would imagine it would be better to apply it to raw wood. #2-I have found that 2 layers seals the wood fairly well. #3-A varnish(with UV filters) will help to protect the sealer from UV rays which would,over time,cause deterioration.

Answered on 09/10/2015 by GARY LINGENFELTER
Answer Question

Question

Is it okay to just sand and clean the bottom of hull and just apply fiber mat and resin without putting any primer?

Asked on 08/26/2015 by John Benoit

Top Answer

Thank you Barry

Answered on 08/27/2015 by John Benoit
See More Answers (7)

Answer

I haven't used the penetrating epoxy in this manner. I would think you would want all the gelcoat and any paint etc removed for the resin to adhere

Answered on 08/27/2015 by MARK EVANS

Answer

Thanks Ken for the info

Answered on 08/27/2015 by John Benoit

Answer

I'm building with treated 3/4 inch plywood the ply is new on a 15.6 foot sneak boat I wanted to know if I had to seal my wood before fiberglassing or would it be safe to to sand,clean and fiberglass my hull?

Answered on 08/27/2015 by John Benoit

Answer

Hi, I am new to the product also, but I have used it on my wood double planked Pen Yann. I sanded the bottom and removed all the old caucking (where there was some)and then applied TotalBoat Penetration Epoxy thinned 50% to the seam area. I then applied a second full strength coat. I then filled the seams with TotalBoat Thixo Wood two part epxoy adhesive. Other than the seam area, the wood can still breathe. In my view, this process seals the seams, but still allows the wood to breathe. It has reduced the leaking to where I run the bilge pump for 10 seconds in a 12 hour period. Hope this helps.

Answered on 08/27/2015 by KEN MISGEN

Answer

Sorry about question didn't quiet explained my hull is made from 3/4 inch treated plywood it is new its a 15.6 hunting sneak boat I just wanted to know if I had to seal plywood before fiberglassing if so I will if not I will fiberglass

Answered on 08/27/2015 by John Benoit

Answer

Sorry about question my hull is new its a 15.6 sneak hunting boat its3/4 inch treated plywoodi just wanted to know if I had to put a preserve before fiberglassing if so I will if not I will fiberglass thanks mark

Answered on 08/27/2015 by John Benoit

Answer

I don't know what type of hull material you have or what condition you are trying to correct so it's hard to respond. I bought CPES to apply to a wood hull prior to painting. The hull was stripped of old paint and then sanded. The CPES soaked into the wood to harden the wood and prevent rot. I then used a paint primer, then paint. What's your hull material and what are you trying to accomplish?

Answered on 08/27/2015 by Barry Karow
Answer Question

Question

I bought this stuff to coat a new plywood floor that I'm putting into an aluminum fishing boat. I notice that i appears that people are injecting this into a transoms. Is that a reasonable way to beef up a mushy transom that's encased in aluminum. I thought I might be looking at a transom replacement next, but is this an option to consider?

Asked on 03/29/2016 by Jeff White

Top Answer

Yes, this may be an option. It depends on the % of the mushy portion. Depending on the location of the damaged area and the amount of the damaged area you need to determine if this will stabilize the transom. I would suggest no more than 10 % for injection. You must remove as much moisture as possible and be sure you inject all of the existing area. The transom is a structural area and does require as much strength as originally designed. This method works well and is a good application for certain repairs. Good luck, always error on the side of safety.

Answered on 03/30/2016 by WALTER BOSSINGER
See More Answers (6)

Answer

thanks Walter. This is completely new to me so bear with my question. What do you mean 'no more than 10%'? Are you saying that I should only try this if the affected rotted area is only 10% or less of the transom? Or are you suggesting a dilution of the penetrating epoxy?

Answered on 03/30/2016 by Jeff White

Answer

GOOD STUFF. JUST KEEP THE FINISHED EPOXY OUT OF THE SUN SEEMS TO HAVE NO UV PROTECTION

Answered on 03/29/2016 by LOUIS KOLBE

Answer

Can't be sure about your suggested application without seeing the boat but In my opinion, the transom is probably outside the intended purpose of the penetrating epoxy. It works great for stabilizing wood for cabinetry and trim that may need some rejuvenation but the transom is a major structural member and under a lot of stress underway. Injection of regular epoxy might be a solution for the transom but it would require complete drying of the rotted area and multiple injection sites to be sure the repair was strong enough. I would suggest no shortcuts where the transom is concerned and replacement is bar far the best solution. Sealing the replacement wood with regular epoxy would guarantee the strength of the repair and eliminate any possibility of rot in the future.

Answered on 03/29/2016 by JERRY DILLINGER

Answer

I would replace the transom, especially if you are hanging a motor on it.

Answered on 03/30/2016 by DAVID KAPPEL

Answer

I'm thinking you might need a different product. One that has more body. Like a rot product. I think they offer some that have more air or gap filling properties. Your headed done the right track just not this particular product.

Answered on 03/29/2016 by DONALD FERNANDEZ

Answer

No I would not do that

Answered on 03/29/2016 by DAVID NORRIS
Answer Question

Question

I have some "voids" in the bottom of a marine plywood lapstrake boat I am refinishing. I've scrapped off the old paint and old wood. I don't know whether to fill the voids with Total Fair surfacing putty followed by Total Boat epoxy or use the expoxy first followed by the surfacing putty. Which order of application is preferable?

Asked on 06/18/2015 by Ken B

Top Answer

Apply the penetrating epoxy first to seal the wood, then fill the voids.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by Rick White
See More Answers (6)

Answer

I would apply at least 2 coats of the epoxy first to protect and seal the wood before adding putty to fill the voids, make sure to read the putty directions first and what they recommend. In my experience the epoxy does act as an excellent sealer and primer for varnish, paint, caulk, and is imagine putty. Good luck!

Answered on 06/19/2015 by Justin Thompson

Answer

Hi Ken! I have a 100', wooden, 1942, retired tugboat, and experience patching and protecting wood. In your situation I would sand the area clean and soak the exposed wood with Total Boat Penetrating Epoxy. This should stabilize any rot or soft wood, and serve as a primer. (I just bought two gallons from Jamestown, it I like it.) Then I would patch the hole with USC Duraglas (I am not familiar with Total Fair). I use a gallon or two of USC Duraglas every year, and like it a lot. Then I would put a coat of Finishing Epoxy on the patch area. I use West System these days, but I experiment with other brands. After the Finishing Epoxy drives, wash it thoroughly. In the setting process, some chemicals surface that resist paint. Good luck. Pete S.

Answered on 06/19/2015 by Pete Strell

Answer

Thanks for the info. I especially appreciate the tip on applying the filler while the epoxy is green.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by Ken B

Answer

I would apply the epoxy first. It is more structural than fairing putty. Fairing putty is intended to be easy to sand and shape for a smooth appearance. Its for cosmetic use. If the voids are just cosmetic, then i would only use the fairing putty. My opinion.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by Carl Carl

Answer

I've been doing the same repairs on my plywood lapstrake boat. A 1958 40' Chris Craft Sea Skiff. It works. For delaminations I drill ~1/8" holes to a depth of 1/2 the board thickness about 2" apart, and then inject the penetrating epoxy until it comes out the next hole. Repeat the injections until it won't drink anymore. Wear eye protection. I had a syringe collapse and fill my eyeball with hot goo. Not good. If you have voids between the plies inject slightly thickened epoxy once the wood is saturated.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by MAREK PRZETAKIEWICZ

Answer

I always saturate the wood with epoxy before applying any filler. Lately I've been using the penetrating epoxy. If you can, apply the filler while the epoxy is still green to get a good chemical bond.

Answered on 06/18/2015 by MAREK PRZETAKIEWICZ
Answer Question

Question

I am in the process of salvaging a four year old fir porch floor that has been tongue oiled and is showing heavy weathering due to water, sun and mold along the first ten courses. The more protected areas are still holding the oil finish. Should I sand damaged areas and re-oil to match finish and then apply Total Boat or just sand damaged areas, apply Total Boat, then apply sealer over all ? Thx, Steve

Asked on 06/02/2015 by Steve Rickard

Top Answer

I've only used The P E on new sanded wood, oak,pine and spanish cedar. It really does penetrate. However I would not expect it to penetrate on anything that has been treated with an oil base solution. On the pine, even though it was well dried, the P E did not penetrate the sappy areas, it just floated on top.

Answered on 06/02/2015 by Wayne Smith
See More Answers (6)

Answer

I used this on wood floorboards on an old car I restored. I found it to be very thick (like honey, just like the 5 min epoxy you buy) it did not penetrate as well as I wanted and the thickness was hard to control (15 min working time). The result was uneven and wavy. the floor is covered by carpet so it was okay for what I needed. This is what I thought I was buying and from all I have heard it's a thin and penetrates well. "Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer. It's manufactured by Smith & Company"

Answered on 06/02/2015 by ROBERT SHAFTO

Answer

You normally remove all the old finish first. The epoxy is applied next to seal the wood. Most marine varnishes can be applied over the epoxy, however, since you are using an oil, I would try it on a scrap piece of wood first, since most oil finishes are also penetrating types. The oil may not be workable with an epoxy undercoat.

Answered on 06/02/2015 by RALPH GARCIA

Answer

Hi Steve, The Total Boat epoxy will probably be better absorbed by bare wood (it should be thinned with denatured alcohol to increase penetration). Also, you will need to have some sort of coating(with UV filters) on top of the epoxy as it will degrade over time when exposed to sunlight.I'm not sure how well the existing finish on protected areas will match an area epoxied and then covered with an oil finish so you might want to try it on a small not readily visible area.Hope this helped.

Answered on 06/09/2015 by GARY LINGENFELTER

Answer

I have had great luck in Using the Total boat as the sealer and applying the finish over it. Not sure how this would work with an oil finish as the epoxy forms a pretty hard shell

Answered on 06/02/2015 by WILLIAM KARMIS

Answer

The wood needs to be sanded clean from the wax finish. I use about 25percent acetone added to the epoxy mix. This gives better penetration. Then a finish applied that is uv stabilized. It is very important that the epoxy is protected from the suns rays. As to whether you do the whole floor, I would say this. There will definitely be a different appearance between the new finish and the old. Also, if the weather is warm you need to get the epoxy applied quickly. (I used a foam roller and back brushed) I just finished a project and with a 70 degree day I had about 35 minutes working time. Good luck.

Answered on 06/03/2015 by LYNWOOD JOYCE

Answer

The directions for any epoxy state apply to a "clean dry surface." I only put the penetrating epoxy on bare wood. Using epoxy after sanding only the damaged area may provide a color differential between the oiled wood and the sanded wood. Probably the best way to get an even color is to sand the whole deck then apply the epoxy to the entire deck. However, that is much more work.

Answered on 06/02/2015 by ROBERT CHAYER
Answer Question

Question

Does the tb-cpekit-k-pint kit include both the epoxy and the hardner?

Asked on 01/14/2017 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes. The kit comes with both.

Answered on 01/16/2017 by DAVID BLADES
See More Answers (5)

Answer

Yes it does. I bought it last year and Jamestown gives you the hardener and some other items as well. It's a great product. Look to their blog for tips on using it in different applications. Best of luck!

Answered on 01/15/2017 by KURT FLEMING

Answer

Yep

Answered on 01/14/2017 by PAUL WOLBERT

Answer

Yes that's why it's called a kit. Be careful to keep it off your skin.

Answered on 01/14/2017 by CLIVE JACKSON

Answer

Yes. That's why it's called a "kit."

Answered on 01/14/2017 by STEVE SWINEHART

Answer

Yes

Answered on 01/22/2017 by Juditha Abar
Answer Question

Question

I have built a lumberyard skiff out of marine ply and some fir. I'd like to protect the wood as much as possible but do not want to get into fiberglass. Can i use this product to seal the edges of the plywood? Should i do all of the wood? Thanks

Asked on 07/13/2018 by Stephen from NC

Top Answer

This product is designed for this application, but there are a lot of different schools on thought at the same time. If you do apply this, it will act simply as a sealer, reinforcing the existing grain and preventing water intrusion, but it will not always prevent the wood from still acting like wood. This product will reduce the chance for rot and water intrusion, but it would still need to be painted or varnished after for UV resilience. Some customers do seal all of the boat, and we have had good feedback from that, but it is more about customer preference. After applying, the penetrating epoxy will probably take at least a day or two to cure. Wash all epoxy with mild soap and water prior to sanding, then apply the desired paint or varnish for protection.

Answered on 07/13/2018 by JD Tech Associate
See More Answers (4)

Answer

Hi. The TB penetrating epoxy would accomplish that task however I don't recommend it. Wooden boats don't do epoxy well anywhere the wood might shrink or swell due to atmospheric change. The wood fibers can tear causing adhesion problems. If you're going to topcoat with an easy to use traditional varnish like Epifanes, the Pettit 2018 sealer is very easy to work with and can be topcoated faster without worrying about amine blush. It will seal the end grain. If you're planning on slathering a boatload of epoxy all over the boat you can just warm your epoxy of choice and the wood and it'll suck the solution into the end grain. You're still gonna have to put a UV protection over the epoxy. Don't forget to carefully remove the amine blush. Kind regards

Answered on 07/13/2018 by tycerrenovations

Answer

My advise is to roll all the sharp edges , use two coats epoxy as per directions ,not too thick, Should never be a problem ....

Answered on 07/13/2018 by leoaugust007

Answer

Yes, I think will work as sealant. Be patient with curing time. Keep in mind that epoxy will often result in waxy surface so be sure to sand before painting of other coating.

Answered on 07/14/2018 by rmede

Answer

Yes! Use it on all the wood especially the butt ends and plywood edges. You can also thin it a little to make it penetrate even more. Any epoxy thinner will do. Lightly sand smooth and give it at least 3 coats of paint sanding between coats. You will have a very durable finish and still feel like a wood boat

Answered on 07/14/2018 by corsairmike
Answer Question

Question

I am planning on using this product to seal two sections of a floor for my aluminum fishing boat prior to carpeting it. I plan to connect the two sections by gluing and bolting them together with a wooden bracket. My plan was to do this after all the pieces have been sealed with epoxy to provide the greatest protection. My question is what preparation do I need to do to the surface of piece that will be glued to ensure the strongest bond. I am planning to use Titebond III glue. Thanks for your help!

Asked on 05/21/2018 by floorbored from Madison WI

Top Answer

Once you seal the wood with the epoxy, the Titebond will not be able to work like it normally does on wood. You probably want an epoxy adhesive, such as our Thixo product, which is a pre-thickened epoxy in a standard caulk gun style tube, for the best adhesion.

Answered on 06/14/2018 by JD Tech Associate
See More Answers (4)

Answer

If you're talking about sealing the wood with the penetrating epoxy then you should use an adhesive epoxy to glue the pieces together. Titebond III is a great glue for wood when the wood is unfinished but I don't think it will bond well to the penetrating epoxy treated wood.

Answered on 05/22/2018 by skazmierski4

Answer

I think I understand what you are doing, but I'm not confident about using titebond III on the sealed sections of flooring. This epoxy effectively "waterproofs" the wood, and titebond requires at least minimal access to the fibers of the wood? I think I would be much more confident in using a full bodied epoxy for the joining of the bracket and sections. Theoretically, with a little roughing of the joined surfaces, the epoxy should bond to the existing epoxied surface. My gut tells me that the titebond would simply peel off of the epoxied wood and contribute very little adhesion. Just my two cents.....

Answered on 05/22/2018 by rpttrsn

Answer

I would glue it first and then seal it. And I would use epoxy to glue it. I doubt Titebond would adhere well to a sealed surface. Good luck! David K

Answered on 05/21/2018 by dkuhfahl

Answer

The total boat penetrating epoxy works fine ( not as good as the old smiths product but California laws killed it) . Don't use titebond 111 it's just a modified PVA buy a small west products epoxy kit and use that as glue . Put the penetrating epoxy on until it quits soaking in If you want a nicer base finish knock it down with 220 grit on a block then one more coat. Let it cure do your glue up. (Make sure all your holes were drilled before the first coat and all the fitting / cutting is complete) Lightly scuff the surface and apply the finish coat. During installation don't over torque the fasteners and crack the finish! It will last a long time and worth the trouble to do it right! Cheers!

Answered on 05/22/2018 by petegraham52
Answer Question

Question

I'm repairing a table leg that broke due to extreme powder post infestation. Is this a good product for pouring down the holes left by the beetles before drilling for dowels to reinforce the break? Powder post holes are not visible on the surface

Asked on 04/06/2018 by Jimbo from Troy, NY

Top Answer

Hi Jimbo, this would be a great product to help reinforce the grain around these holes.

Answered on 06/01/2018 by JD Tech Associate
See More Answers (4)

Answer

Yes, just be sure the area is completely saturated. You may have to drill more holes to open things up. After the penetrating epoxy has set up, you can then pour in standard epoxy. You may have to tape around the leg to keep the epoxy from running out.

Answered on 04/06/2018 by josephbettis

Answer

I would have to believe it would do the job.  The penetrating epoxy bond the wood and firms it up quite well. It can also be thinned with acetone to penetrate deeper.

Answered on 04/07/2018 by brentdillmannn

Answer

The Total Boat Penetrating Epoxy will perform like a champ on the infestation. I have used it to fill similar spots on a large slab of kiln dried pecan that I used to built a live edge table. Good luck with it.

Answered on 04/08/2018 by fsmith143

Answer

By itself to fill holes, no. It seems to need the structure of some old wood, into which it can absorb, to create strength. Material that has cured by itself is a little rubbery. I have not used it with any fillers.

Answered on 04/09/2018 by dgriglack
Answer Question
1 of 13