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Fiberglass Cloth - 4 Ounce
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Fiberglass Cloth - 4 Ounce
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Fiberglass Cloth - 4 Ounce Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 16 Questions

Question

I have a very old fiberglass canoe that has several small holes and the gel coat is cracked all over. I want to repair the holes and re gel coat the entire canoe. since it is so old I was wondering if it would be best to put a single layer of fiberglass cloth over the entire canoe just to give it extra strength? And if so which cloth would be best. The canoe is approximately 14 feet long, 3 feet wide at the middle, and has a depth of 15 inches.

Asked on 03/04/2012 by Evan Adams

Top Answer

Are fiberglass products sold by the square yard, or linear yard. That is, how many square yards are in a 150' roll of 50" 6oz cloth? Thanks, Chris F.

Answered on 12/07/2013 by CHRIS FLACCUS
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Evan, I think the answer depends on the structural condition of the balance of the canoe and what you intend to do with it. Not having seen your boat, my instinct would be to fix the holes with heavier cloth and then fair this repair into the hull. I've done this for moderate hull damage on a cedar strip boat and it worked great. Then you would go for the gel finish. Save the weight, time and expense associated with reapplying even a thin veneer of fiberglass to the exterior, unless your use requires it. Good luck! Paul D

Answered on 03/07/2012 by PAUL DAY

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Evan The 4 ounce cloth would be ideal, the important thing is the preparation to the canoe hull before laying out and wetting the cloth. Sand the hull, with at least 60 grit paper to ensure a good bonding surface, removing any loose gel coat, repair holes, then wet out hull and lay out cloth, rolling the cloth to ensure cloth is well pregnated with resin. After hull is dry, lightly sand to remove any lumps etc, then apply gel coat. Good luck

Answered on 03/05/2012 by GRANT GAFFNEY

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Small holes??? Need to elaborate further on that one. Only reason for holes would be screws from previous owners mounting stuff. if they are less than an eigth inch thickened 5 minute epoxy will do the job. 1/4" and larger should have some glass backing around it on the inside of the hull. The canoe had thick enough glass on it to get it this far. Adding glass will make it noticably heavier. Most fiberglass canoes are built with hand laid cloth, but maybe some ultra-cheap ones were built "chopper gun" style, where the hull is made out of short strands in random orientations. Sears "gamefishers" were built this way. It is weak and heavy but dirt cheap. To get more mileage out of those, I could see some sense in putting a layer of cloth on the outside, but I'd probably use something heavier than 4oz. Cracked gelcoat is common, especially on very old hulls. The good news is that it's not lethal. Just sanding and attempting to fill the cracks often gets you a few years. Coating with 4oz cloth will probably work pretty well for hiding it if you can stand the extra weight. You may want to mitigate the weight gain by sanding off the present gelcoat until the glass starts to show through (careful doing this--the surface of the glass is not fair!) Re-fairing the hull after you've put on the glass will take a lot of patience.

Answered on 03/05/2012 by Breadmaker Breadmaker

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I really know nothing about gel coat, but I used the 4 ounce on some custom truck boxes and it worked great in the field when applied over fir ply, though there has been some cracking in the corners. I think you may have to sand off the gel coat for the epoxy to get a good bond to the existing fiberglass.

Answered on 03/05/2012 by JASON CLARK

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Small holes may be a relative term, as is age. What is the boat worth to you now and what do you want it to be worth to a future buyer? If you're just looking for an every day user boat I think another coat of glass and resin will add unnecessarily to the weight of the boat. I'd suggest just a patch approach for the holes, then sand everything carefully and then re-coat with resin.

Answered on 03/05/2012 by BARRY KAROW

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I am not an expert in fiberglass boat repair. I did a quick on google search asking your question and found replies from several sources. You might start there. Two cautions come to mind. First the compatability between the resin used in the gelcoat and the resin you use for the repair. Second the weight added by coating the entire hull, I'd guess between 15 and 20 pounds. Good luck with your project. Ed

Answered on 03/05/2012 by EDWARD SMITH

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Evan, This is a good cloth when covering the entire boat because it will not add much weight to it. I use it to cover ceder strip canoes and they have lot of small cracks at the begining and after the cloth is applied it gives it incredable strength I usually lay the cloth with West System epoxy. David

Answered on 03/06/2012 by DAVID MCCROSSIN

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Hello Evan, I build cedar strip kayaks and use the 4oz. cloth on the inside. It drapes easily, fills easily and totally disappears in epoxy. 4oz. should work fine to fill and strengthen an already glassed boat. Randy

Answered on 03/05/2012 by RANDY ECHTINAW
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Question

I am using this cloth to cover plywood to make a panel for my boat. What resin would you recommend? I assume West System is ok? Also, i selected this cloth, because i'm more concerned about the finish of the panel than strength. Please let me know if you recommend a different cloth or mat for a good finish. Thanks! Ed

Asked on 04/09/2013 by EDWARD HOCK

Top Answer

I'm a carpenter, and have built two sets of rail truck boxes to hold my tools, both with 3/4 ac plywood covered with fiberglass set in West System. On my first set I used 6 oz, and after about 5 yrs. of heavy use, they are still going strong, on a friends work truck. On my second set I used 4 oz., and it has cracked in spots, and doesn't seem to have the durability needed, allowing for water penetration into the plywood. The benefit was that the weave depth was shallower, so they were quicker to finish. Hope this helps.

Answered on 04/12/2013 by JASON CLARK
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west system is good, but my last boat used mas epoxie which worked very well,a little pricer but worth it.4 oz. cloth still has good strength and wets in nice.

Answered on 04/17/2013 by MARK BJORK

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4 ounce per yard fiberglass cloth is virtually invisible over wood when properly wetted out. I have used West System epoxy to build wood-framed boats with an exterior fiberglass coating and have been very happy with it. West System epoxy does not cure quite as clear and colorless as some others, such as System 3 epoxy, according to some wooden boat builders, but the difference in pictures I have seen posted on the web has been minimal.

Answered on 04/12/2013 by PETER BLANC

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What size and type of boat are you building or repairing ? Where will the panel be positioned ? How is the boat being used ? West System is fine to use.

Answered on 04/12/2013 by ROGER WEEKS

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The 4oz cloth becomes invisable under a coat of West System of 105 and 205. It makes a very slick and clear finish. A light sanding and it can be painted

Answered on 04/12/2013 by ROBERT COVER

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The west system used with the cloth will work for strength and will be virtually invisible when done. You should epoxy both sides of the plywood to keep it from warping, then apply the fiberglass cloth the next day. I hope this helps! Wayne

Answered on 04/11/2013 by WAYNE BUGDEN

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Yes West System clear works but I prefer System 3. My experience is System 3 does not "blush" and West tends to. You might also be aware that epoxy does not resist heat such as around an engine bay. Here I would a vinyl esther resin. Almost all racing hydroplanes use a layer of 3 or 4 oz glass over the mahogany ply. We then use automotive clear coat over that for scratch resistance. Here I prefer the Dupont system.

Answered on 04/11/2013 by W DAVID RICHARDSON

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Ed, 4 ounce cloth with 2-3 applications of epoxy resin should do just fine. The idea is to fill the weave of the cloth without putting on too much resin that will only add weight and expense. A light sanding between applications of resin is advisable to facilitate adhesion between coats of resin. Finish off your work with a couple of coats of marine varnish that has UV inhibitors. Epoxy resin will deteriorate when exposed to direct sunlight for any length of time. The varnish will protect the epoxy from deterioration. Any of the major brands of epoxy sold for marine use can be used. I have used MAS, West and System Three resins with good success.

Answered on 04/12/2013 by JOHN STERBENZ
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Question

I m repairing a 4" long crack in a fiberglass bath tub. Plan on beveling out the crack , sanding and cleaning then using fiberglass and "Resin or Epoxy?" to lay in several layers of increasing smaller piece of cloth in the crack. What is the difference between resin and epoxy and what thickness cloth would be best. The crack is just where the tub curves up to the side so I want it to be strong. Todd

Asked on 01/22/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Haven't done fiberglass bathtub repairs. So, my .02 worth: 1. Get your materials together. 2. Sand the crack thoroughly. 3. Coat the crack with epoxy, 5 or 15 minute epoxy would be good 4. Put a small piece (sliver) of fiberglass cloth in the bottom of crack & coat with just enough epoxy so the cloth becomes transparent. Use a plastic squeege to smooth. 5. If necessary, put another piece of fiberglass cloth on top of the first layer & coat with epoxy & smooth. 6. Allow to cure and give a final sanding.

Answered on 01/23/2014 by ROGER WEEKS
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Todd: Fairing glass cloth can be an effort in futility but can be done with care. I would recommend using West System (or System Three) Epoxy with their fairing compound to fill the void instead of using cloth. The 4 oz woven fabric will work quite well as long as the substrate is solid but it doesn't like to bridge gaps. If you can get to the outside of the crack, overlay a piece of cloth for tensile strength, fill the void inside with fairing compound, and cover with another piece of cloth. Use Epoxy instead of Polyester resin, the epoxy will bond, the resin will flake off over time. Hope this helps.

Answered on 01/22/2014 by CRAIG WALKER

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First I would use epoxy over resin as it is strong and will last longer. I guess almost any size would work but I would probably use 4 oz. cloth. In strip as you indicated. . good luck.

Answered on 01/22/2014 by Donald Welsch

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I have used the West system epoxy and resin on a hole on the bottom of a fiberglass tub for a quick repair. I lightly sanded the fiberglass until I was sure all the shiny colored resin was dull. It has lasted two years of daily use with no problems. Now about your repair of a side crack with the 4oz cloth. If the tub hasn't separated at the crack then you should be able to do the same as above except use the cloth to give it strength. Otherwise if it is separated, then you would need the cloth on both inside and outside which would be difficult to do if the tub is installed

Answered on 01/22/2014 by WAYNE BUGDEN

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Todd; Resin is one of the parts to the epoxy. The other is the hardner. 2 are mixed and applied to the cloth and will harden. Be sure the repair area is clean and dry. Apply the mixed epoxy, then the cloth. Saturate the cloth with more epoxy and it will become transparent. Keep in mind the hardened epoxy will be tough to sand so as it hardens, try and smooth it out as it sets. Let it dry for the recommended time. The finish coat of epoxy can be thickened with a sanding filler (reddish color, but easy to sand). Take the time to prep the area before painting. The prep work is the key to a good finish. hope this helps

Answered on 01/22/2014 by JERRY STAVOLA

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Shopper: The 4 OZ cloth should work fine, the best way to cut the small strips you want without fraying is with a "Friskars rotary cutter" # 1993575 at Joanns. I would recommend epoxy over Resin. Epoxy is a little more flexible, does not form a film when curing and be easier to feather out. Also most paints will bond to Epoxy better.

Answered on 01/23/2014 by RONALD JONES

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A couple of issues. First, if you are using the West system, it is a 2 part resin and hardener. You would mix the resin with the hardener in a predefined ratio which would result in the fluid mixture that you would use to soak the fiberglass mat. You won't need much resin and hardner for a 4 inch crack so you might want to use the G/5 5 minute adhesive with is also a two part resin and hardner but comes in much smaller 4 oz bottles. In any case, you would then make the repair, fair the repaired area and then probably paint over it. I'm not certain of the compatibility of the West system or G5 with the "fiberglass" that your tub is made of. You should make certain that the West system epoxy or G5 and the fiberglass in your tub are compatible. Secondly, I'm not sure how strong the fix will be if you fill the tub with water and have someone in the tub. This could result in more weight than your repair could take. It's a gamble, but it might work. Good luck.

Answered on 01/22/2014 by JACK KITRENOS
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Question

I have a very old fiberglass canoe that has several small holes and the gel coat is cracked all over. I want to repair the holes and re gel coat the entire canoe. since it is so old I was wondering if it would be best to put a single layer of fiberglass cloth over the entire canoe just to give it extra strength? and if so which cloth would be best. The canoe is approximately 14 feet long, 3 feet wide at the middle, and has a depth of 15 inches.

Asked on 03/05/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Have done about a dozen canoes. Use the 4 ounce fiberglass matt. Cover entire canoe with epoxy, set full matt, another layer of epoxy, and put a diagonal piece of matt in center bottom of canoe. More epoxy and sand out. last matt is normall 4'x4'. this seems to give maximum strength.

Answered on 03/05/2012 by ROBERT RUETER
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I greatly appreciate the advice it was exactly what I needed! I was wondering if I need to re gel coat or if I can just paint the entire canoe with a few coats, and what about the inside of the canoe, just paint or a gel coat?

Answered on 03/06/2012 by Evan Adams

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Yes that would be a good idea. It would not only fix the holes, or cover the fix you put on, but also stop all the cracking. I built both a rudder and a centerboard this year and used the lightest cloth I could get, 4 OZ. I think. It worked well. Also use epoxy not polyester, it holds on to older work much better. I built a 25 foot Glen-L plywood sailboat and did all of it with epoxy; 15 years later it is still perfect and strong. Thanks! Dave

Answered on 03/05/2012 by DAVID SAUER

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This would indeed be an appropriate way to refurbish the hull. I'd begin by sanding away most of the existing gel coat. Use proper dust masks to protect yourself while sanding. You'll be able to tell when most has been removed, since the underlying color of the fiberglass hull will begin to show through. I'd suggest doing the last bit of sanding by hand, using a fairing board and 60-80 grit paper. This will help to level the surface and eliminate high and low spots. Grind out the areas surrounding any holes and patch with pieces of FG cloth and resin. Sand the patches flush with the rest of the hull. I won't go into the full patching procedure, here. There is much info. about that elsewhere. After vacuuming off the hull and wiping it down with lacquer thinner (do outside), lay on the new cloth as neatly as possible. If possible, do it with a single piece. You'll need to slit the cloth at the stems. Apply the epoxy resin, working from the center towards the ends and from the"keel" line towards the sheer, working out any wrinkles along the way. When applying the epoxy, working with a helper is much easier than working alone. Use a slow setting, low blush resin. My preference is West System resin with #207 hardener. There are other excellent alternatives. Follow the West System instructions. Apply a second / 3rd coat as necessary to fill the weave of the cloth. Once the final coat of resin has cured, wet sand beginning with #180 grit paper and working up through at least #300. Choose your preferred paint/primer and apply according to the manufacturer's directions. Marc Ornstein Dogpaddle Canoe Works Custom Canoe Paddles and Woodstrip Canoes

Answered on 03/05/2012 by MARC ORNSTEIN

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There have been several mentions of west epoxy and mat in this thread. They should never be used together. Mat is made with a binder to hold the loose strands together until wet out with resin. The binder is designed to dissolve in Polyester resin and it helps promote saturation of the mat by the polyester resin. This does not happen with epoxy. There are some mats and fabmats made to work with epoxy, but they are rare and hard to find. In polyester the mat is the adhesive layer and the roving or cloth is the strength layer. Epoxy is already adhesive and you only need the cloth to provide the strength.

Answered on 03/06/2012 by DAVIS BOAT WORKS

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one layer of 4 oz. cloth would add strength and durability. It would not add that much weight either. I would rough up the entire surface with course sand paper and use epoxy resin.

Answered on 03/05/2012 by MATTHEW O'NEILL

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that is a good idea. but make shure to remove all the old paint and rough up the gell coat.

Answered on 03/05/2012 by BRUCE BROOKS
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Question

Hi ! Which way is it , I want some thin cloth . Is the lower the oz. the thinner ?

Asked on 03/03/2013 by Greg Smock

Top Answer

I belive the lower the number the lighter the weight. 4oz wets good, becoming clear, and is plenty strong.

Answered on 03/04/2013 by ROBERT COVER
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The lower oz the thinner! I used 4oz for a feather weight canoe. Please note that the thinner you make it the lesser strength.

Answered on 03/04/2013 by WAYNE BUGDEN

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Yes Greg, the lower the ounce number the less (thinner material) per yard and takes much less resin to fill the weave

Answered on 03/04/2013 by RANDY ECHTINAW

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Short answer is yes.....lower oz. means oz per unit area.....per square foot, I think.

Answered on 03/05/2013 by DAVID HOWES

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I can not remember.

Answered on 03/04/2013 by RICHARD TOMAN

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Hi Greg, I think you've already figured it out, the lower the weight in ounces, the thinner the cloth. Most of the cloth JD carries is appropriate for boat building. If you need a very fine cloth (say 1/2 oz. or such) you might try a shop that sells r/c boats and airplanes. I hope that helps, Ray

Answered on 03/05/2013 by RAY VOSPER
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Question

how much epoxy does it take to do a job for 10 yards of 50" wide 4 oz fiberglass?

Asked on 04/07/2014 by Ken Engledow

Top Answer

Assuming you are using a wet layup I would start with double the weight of the cloth. If vacuum bagging much less. So you have 56 oz of cloth I would buy 112 oz of resin about a gallon. This is only a general rule I would use for a wet lay up which allows for mixing loss. If you are going over a porous rough surface you may need more. Most importantly try to buy your product elsewhere. Jamestown distributors has used deceptive sales tactics with me and ignored my request to resolve the problem. I no longer do business with them. Hope this helps.

Answered on 04/07/2014 by BRIAN SESSA
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About 1 gallon. You're using a little over 120 SF of material. Some people figure about 1 oz/SF. And a gallon is 128 oz. That would be the total amount including resin and hardener.

Answered on 04/07/2014 by ROGER WEEKS

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I use the 4 oz. glass with West System's epoxy to build strip canoes. A 10' solo boat takes about 10 yards of cloth and I use about a gallon and a quarter of epoxy and hardener. That gives me three thin coats on the outside and two on the inside. The inside is "non-skid" with the weave of the cloth still visible.

Answered on 04/07/2014 by CRAIG WALKER

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I like to spread the first layer using the "dry" method-put the cloth down and gently spread the epoxy with a 4-6" "squeegee ". I think the job described would use between 1/2 gallon and one gal. I'd probably recommend 1 gallon of epoxy and the corresponding amount of hardener, e.g., 1/2 gal of system 3 w/ 1 gal of system 3 epoxy. That's for two coats. You might get by with 1/2 gallon- If you have to buy more it's more expensive for the smaller amounts. Also I'd get medium drying or slow drying hardener as you don't want it to set up too quickly. If you're in a hot climate I'd recommend slow. Hope this helps! wstm- email me any time. On Apr 7, 2014, at 7:46 PM, Jamestown Distributors wrote:

Answered on 04/07/2014 by WM MAYHALL

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One gallon will cover 15 square yards so figure it out. I like three coats on a boat. I can no longer build boats but I always bought by the gallon knowing I would use it sooner or later.

Answered on 04/08/2014 by Donald Welsch
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Question

I want to buid a cedar strip canoe. What do I need for a 17' 36" beam? It will be glassed inside and out.

Asked on 04/24/2012 by David Fellows

Top Answer

Hi Dave, I built two wooden boats and fiber glassed them both. I used epoxy cloth on the outside and penetrating epoxy on the inside. I had too many frames to try to us cloth on the inside. Epoxy works much better than polyester as it sticks to the wood much better. I never mixed much epoxy at a time, just many plastic cups. 14 years later they are both as good as the day they were built. Dave

Answered on 04/25/2012 by DAVID SAUER
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I would use 4 oz cloth on the inside but I might consider a heavier cloth for the outside. Keep in mind this adds weight to a light canoe.

Answered on 04/24/2012 by Donald Welsch

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What are you asking ??? Is 4 oz. cloth suitable? Answer....... Yes How much cloth do you need ? Answer....that's your problem. I would not recommend glassing the inside. Coat the inside with epoxy resin. And use epoxy resin for the outside work. Wood likes to expand and contract. If you capture it between two layers of fiberglass cloth you are asking for trouble.........right here in River City.

Answered on 04/24/2012 by MATTHEW O'NEILL

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David, It depends a bit on how the canoe will be used. For general purposes, for a tandem canoe, I'd recommend 2 layers of 4 oz.cloth (inside and out, in the "football" area (basically, that would be the area below the waterline. Foe areas above the waterline, a single layer, inside and out would be sufficient. If the canoe will be used a bit less gently, you could follow the same procedure, using 6 oz. cloth. Unless the boat will be used in heavy rapids, there is likely no reason to go any heavier. Conversely, it the boat will only receive gentle usage (day trips on calm lakes) a single layer of 6 oz. inside and out (skipping the extra layer in the football area) might be sufficient. I'd be pleased to elaborate more if you have specific questions. Marc Ornstein Dogpaddle Canoe Works Custom Canoe Paddles and Woodstrip Canoes

Answered on 04/24/2012 by MARC ORNSTEIN

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First build the boat; then measure the girth if you can use one piece per side that makes things pretty easy. If you are In Maine, perhaps I can give you a hand. Dave

Answered on 04/24/2012 by WOODMAN ENGINEERING
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Question

I have a 4 ft by 8 ft section to repair on the deck of my boat what do I need?

Asked on 01/28/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I am a wood boat builder. I bought the 4 oz. glass to put over cedar veneer. It has little strength by itself; I used it to prevent visible lines at the veneer seams. If you have a fiberglass boat and you want to replace a deck section you need to read the Gougeon Brothers book on using epoxy. Jamestown sells it. Good luck, Dave

Answered on 01/30/2012 by WOODMAN ENGINEERING
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It's hard to say what you'll need without knowing what's wrong with the 4x8 section. If the deck needs to be replaced, you'll need a whole bunch of stuff. If there's only cosmetic damage or minor repair required, less stuff is needed. You'll get better answers and advice if you can be more specific about the damage.

Answered on 01/30/2012 by PETER SCHWIND

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The 4 ounce cloth I bought I use to cover the wooden hulls of model boats/ships I build. Models are generally 4 feet long or shorter. I have built probably 6 or more real boates over the years and I would be inclined to use a heavier cloth on your deck.

Answered on 01/30/2012 by MATTHEW O'NEILL

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1..a sander to clean up the area 2. epoxy to prime the area 3. enough fiberglass mat to overlap 12" around the area. [embed in epoxy primed area.] 4. if it is a high traffic area put another prime coat and another layer of fiberglass over it. 5. then put three coats of epoxy over it. 6. sprinkle crushed walnut shells or carbide in last layer of epoxy for non ship surface.

Answered on 01/30/2012 by ROBERT RUETER

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I hate to say "it depends" but it does. You haven't supplied any information bout what it is that you need to repair nor what the deck is made of. Is it a fiberglass deck, wood covered with glass, canvas, Dynel etc.? Is there a hairline crack, hole, or other damage? Answers to these questions and any other details about what you wish to repair will allow me to provide a relevant answer. Marc Ornstein Dogpaddle Canoe Works Custom Canoe Paddles and Small Boat Fabrication

Answered on 01/30/2012 by MARC ORNSTEIN
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Kevin: I have replaced the floor decking in our ski boat and I want to make it waterproof before I put down the carpet. Is 4oz cloth strong enough to do this or do I need 6oz cloth? I am using west system epoxy resins and hardners

Asked on 02/06/2015 by Kevin C

Top Answer

I used the 4 ounce cloth to waterproof the plywood deck of the glen-l malahini boat I built and was very satisfied with the result. In my case I wanted a thin cloth that would add minimal weight and not show the texture (top deck was stained).

Answered on 02/06/2015 by JEFFREY MCLRAVY
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if it's for protection and not structural, 4 oz. will be good

Answered on 02/06/2015 by JERRY STAVOLA

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Presuming you are just sealing over removeable wood decking, its the resin not the cloth that'll be waterproof. 4" will hold more resin horizaontally, so better, a bit thinner vertically so less good. I'd use the resin liberally making sure its completely wetted out so water has less voids to run in when it does get in.

Answered on 02/07/2015 by TOM BERGH

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I would use 6oz. More durable and less likely to crack if there is any flex at all in the deck.

Answered on 02/06/2015 by STEVEN GOULD
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Question

I am wanting to fiberglass the inside of an Evaporator tank. The inside is made of stainless steel and I would like to use fiberglass for a liner. The tank is approximately 30inches deep and rougly 3 feet square. What would be the best thickness for this application?

Asked on 12/01/2011 by DOUGLAS LEFEVER

Top Answer

Not enough information. If you just want to prevent the stainless from touching what you put in the tank, 4 oz. will do. Are you going to heat the tank? What are the forces at work? Is the liner going to be removable? Sorry to be vague, but more information is needed. Dave

Answered on 12/05/2011 by WOODMAN ENGINEERING
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Douglas; Why does an evaporator tank made of stainless need a liner? In what process is this tank being used? If it's not for anything potable or edible the 4 oz. cloth with colloidal silica additive in the resin should be fine. The cloth lay-up will not adhere to the stainless if metal is smooth and polished. Successive coats of resin will create an impervious barrier.

Answered on 12/05/2011 by DAVID DEMMENT

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Good Day, 4oz .cloth will give a good seal, with some strength, but can be broken, 8oz cloth wil give much more Structure. It only depends on use,

Answered on 12/05/2011 by STEPHEN SILER
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