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Sikaflex 291 LOT
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Sikaflex 291 Long Open Time
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Sikaflex 291 LOT Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 11 Questions

Question

can it be used under water?

Asked on 02/06/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes, with good preparation of substrate(s). Should cure for at least a week before submersion in salt or fresh water. See Sika Corp. tech bulletin.

Answered on 02/11/2015 by BARRY JONES
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Answer

It's a good product. I have never tried to use it underwater. I hope you are only trying to stop up a hull seam. It may work. But it should set for quite awhile to set up and not wash out. If it is a seam sawdust works on small seams as a last resort. If you are trying to bed a thruhull I think that would be ok. It would cure eventually.

Answered on 02/06/2015 by MACKIE BOAT WORKS

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Sikaflex 291 LOT can be used for below waterline repairs with great success after fully curing. I don't know that it can be applied under water with good adhesion.

Answered on 02/06/2015 by JOHN RIETH

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I used it for the teak cockpit bedding. Don`t know about underwater, must say on the tube.

Answered on 02/09/2015 by STEVEN MARTIN

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Yes, successfully used to caulk seams between planking blow water line. Use good masking tape to cover the edge of planks... Caulked seams were cleaned and CPES was applied to all stripped planking, including seams.

Answered on 02/12/2015 by CLIFFORD SOWELL

Answer

From SIKA's product data sheet: "use above or below waterline" and also "do not apply through standing water." Note that 291 LOT's two main advantages are 1)long open time (LOT) for "jobs that require more time" and 2) resists salt water.

Answered on 02/06/2015 by FRANZ VAIL

Answer

I had no luck on metal with it.I found surface needs to be fully dry before applying.

Answered on 02/06/2015 by CAPTDEAN KRAH
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Question

Would this product be a good choice for sealing the seams in the shower on a sailboat?

Asked on 09/02/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

This is the perfect sealant/adhesive for the seams in a sailboat shower. It tools smooth, has a great cleanup and lasts forever. Ensure that the surface is clean and it'll stick there for years to come. Reets Boatworks

Answered on 09/02/2014 by REETS BOATWORKS
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Answer

I would say yes. I have never used it for that. It is easy to use and cleans up well with mineral spirits. I use it for deck seams on old runabouts because it can be sanded down if needed and varnished over. Also it has half the holding power of "5200".

Answered on 09/02/2014 by MACKIE BOAT WORKS

Answer

Hi, I use Sikaflex LOT for sealing seams on wood boat decks, and have been happy with my choice. Deck planks on a wood boat move some, so its important to have a product that has some flex, is rubbery, and can accommodate movement, yet is not impossible to remove. This product bonds well with wood. However, I'm not sure of its bonding ability with metal or fiberglass, but I'm sure Sikaflex specs cover that in print. I hope this helps. Regards, Howard Lehman, Iron River, WI

Answered on 09/02/2014 by HOWARD LEHMAN

Answer

My tube of sikaflex was dried out when I used it....quite close to the expiration date when it arrived. I am sure it is an excellent product for this use.

Answered on 09/02/2014 by JOHN BATES

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The advantage for Sikaflex 291 is that it flexes after setting. It is perfect for setting windows and ports in a hull. It should work great in a sailboat shower, but less expensive products might do an equally good job.

Answered on 09/02/2014 by LEWIS BECKHAM

Answer

291LOT is a marine sealant, resists salt water. I think you would have a better choice with a bathroom sealant for a shower.

Answered on 09/02/2014 by FRANZ VAIL

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yes.

Answered on 09/02/2014 by WINDWALKER WOODS
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Question

Does the unopened tube have a shelf life?

Asked on 02/06/2014 by bill fulton

Top Answer

I have some Sikaflex 291 LOT that has a shelf life dated December of 2013. I have used some of the tubes up to and since that time and there seems to be no problem so far. I would expect it to still be good even later this year. Of course, its always best to buy what you think you'll need and use it up by the shelf life date, but I believe I've used this product before almost a year after its date suggested for best use. However, its February here in Wisconsin, temps have been very low, so my shop where the Sikaflex is stored has not been above 55 degrees for months. If it was much warmer and more humid, I would expect the product to reach a cure state in its tube faster. I hope this answers your question. Regards, Howard

Answered on 02/10/2014 by HOWARD LEHMAN
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Answer

I have not run into a shelf life issue with the sikaflex products. I have some that have been in the shop for over a year and I 've had no issues with them. We now use it a lot and the cases don't have a chance to sit around that long. We use both the 291 and the 291LOT and both are great. Thanks, Adam

Answered on 02/06/2014 by REETS BOATWORKS

Answer

Yes. unopened urethane caulks have a shelf life. I'm not sure what that shelf life is, but I use within 1 year. Tubes should have a date on them which I think is the manufacture date. Look for that to be as recent as possible.

Answered on 02/09/2014 by JOHN RIETH

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I don't yet know.

Answered on 02/07/2014 by RAY DONOHUE

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Yes, it does have an expiration date. The date should be on the side of the tube near the bottom. Since this product is usually a 'permanently' applied material I don't think it is worth chancing having old material ruining a project or, at the very least, setting you way back in time after cleanup and new prep work for re-application.

Answered on 02/06/2014 by JOHN MADDOX

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I really don't know.

Answered on 02/07/2014 by thomas smith

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as far as i find it does- until it is opened. I even put an open one in freezer to keep and it seemed all right.

Answered on 02/07/2014 by CAPTDEAN KRAH
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Question

clean up ?

Asked on 07/01/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Used Sikaflex to fill deck seams on 1958 Chris Craft. Tried to minimize need for clean up by wearing gloves, masking area etc. Mineral spirits worked well to remove excess from varnished surfaces.

Answered on 07/01/2015 by THOMAS WENZEL
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Answer

Mineral spirits works well if uncured.

Answered on 07/02/2015 by BARRY JONES

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I use paint thinner to clean up, relatively easy to do when the sikaflex is first applied, hard to do when cured. If you are joining 2 pieces of wood together with Sikaflex which hasn't been stained/varnished, some of the product can get into the grain even with cleaning with thinner. To remove as much of this as I can,I use the green or maroon scrubbies to clean in the grain. Thinner can clean the hands too, but better to wear gloves. Good luck

Answered on 07/01/2015 by HOWARD LEHMAN

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Paint thinner/mineral spirits work fine. Scrape excess off and use a clean rag. Any film from the thinner can be buffed off with a dry rag. Cleans up great.

Answered on 07/01/2015 by MACKIE BOAT WORKS

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I believe I used it for corking my teak cockpit. I used a lot of tape covering everything that was not the grooves I was corking. The only clean up was me and it was the usual, like with 5200.

Answered on 07/01/2015 by STEVEN MARTIN

Answer

I use orange grit hand cleaner, one gallon container with push pump, clean hands asap, works great and safe.

Answered on 07/01/2015 by GEORGE STEVENS
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Question

does sikaflex 291 need a primer?

Asked on 04/28/2014 by denny frehsee

Top Answer

no,it's ready to go'Like the others say it takes a while to cure.Just used some today.It was kept in the freezer all winter after it had been opened in the tube.I just put a nail to plug the nozzle.

Answered on 04/29/2014 by CAPTDEAN KRAH
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I am assuming you are asking about use on wood? No- you do not need a primer. I used on teak without a prime and it worked very well.

Answered on 04/28/2014 by Jim Engle

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I did not use a primer and had a successful application. I applied 219LOT to clean, freshly surfaced lumber before finishing. Sika does state that primer may be required "to achieve optimal adhesion." I suspect that the need for primer would be specific to what material the 219LOT is being applied to. Of note: LOT = long open time. My application took over a week to set enough to handle the materials after caulking.

Answered on 04/29/2014 by FRANZ VAIL

Answer

I use Sikaflex 291 LOT as an adhesive/caulk, when I need very good watertight adhesion, but not a permanent bond. As I restore old wooden boats I'm most likely to use Sikaflex 291 LOT to fasten wood decks or side planks to their respective battens, along with new silicon bronze screws. If, at a later date, an area gets damaged and I need to remove and then replace a board(s), having used Sikaflex 291 LOT as a bonding agent would make it easier to break the bond than if I had used 3M 5200. Before I fasten these wood pieces together, I always clean any dirt or grease from the boards to be bonded, and then seal these surfaces with a sealer, mostly CPES. I suppose, if one would use the word "primer" very loosely, the sealer does "prime" the surface of the wood to be fastened together, helping the wood pieces bond together better. I hope this is of some help, Howard

Answered on 04/29/2014 by HOWARD LEHMAN

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Not that I am aware of, I applied it to wood that had been sealed with CPES

Answered on 04/28/2014 by DAVID HUNTLEY

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NO, we never use a primer

Answered on 04/28/2014 by BARBARA BURGIS
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Question

I REPAIR INGROUND PLASTIC/FIBERGLAS POOL STEPS AND HAVE BEEN USING 3M 5200 SEALANT/ADHESIVE FOR A LONG TIME, WONDER HOW THIS SIKAFLEX COMPARESTO THE 3M PRODUCTS?

Asked on 01/23/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

My own opinion I like it better than 5200. Easier to work with and dries a lot quicker. mostly marine use for me.

Answered on 01/24/2016 by CAPTDEAN KRAH
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Answer

Sorry, I don't have a good answer for your question. My experience with the Sikiflex was limited to a failure due to excessive ambient temperature. I never thought the problem was caused by the Sikaflex but the 100 degree day I was attempting to use it. Also, I really think it would take a lot to upstage 5200 as a sealant anyway. I always joked that I thought I could build an entire boat using just 5200 by itself.

Answered on 01/24/2016 by RONALD COLE

Answer

I use the Sika 291 because it is somewhat sandable and toolable. It also has about half the holding power of 5200 which I use for adhesive. Check the chart in the catalog. It gives the holding psi of each product. The Sika is a very good product.

Answered on 01/24/2016 by MACKIE BOAT WORKS

Answer

It would be very similar. I use the 291 lot because you can continue to use the produce for a couple of weeks after opening. 5200 must be used immediately.

Answered on 01/24/2016 by Jim Engle

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I've used both products and don't see them as alternatives for each other. I use sikaflex as a bedding compound on my sailboat. It provides excellent bedding and sealing for bolted fittings and deck hardware. It can be easily removed and cleaned off when fittings need to be removed and replaced and rebedded with more sikaflex. It retains its rubber like consistency. I use 5200 when I need a permanent adhesive calk. The key word is permanent, thus I use them for two different application and don't see them as substitutes for each other.

Answered on 01/24/2016 by STEVEN DIEBOLD
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Question

can it be used to caulk teak?

Asked on 11/27/2014 by Derek Duncan

Top Answer

Depends on location. I have used it as a caulk on mahogany planking and as a seal around portlights. It remains somewhat flexible after 2 years as compared to 3m 5200

Answered on 11/30/2014 by CLIFFORD SOWELL
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Answer

I wouldn't dare to give you an answer on that as i never used it for that.

Answered on 11/28/2014 by CAPTDEAN KRAH

Answer

I cannot answer this question; have very limited experience with the 291LOT. It's main application is its salt water resistance and its Long Open Time (slow cure). Sika's MSDS (Google Sikaflex 291LOT) doesn't answer the question either - probably need to contact manufacturer

Answered on 11/28/2014 by FRANZ VAIL

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Only used with acrylic and powder coated aluminum - no experience with wood

Answered on 11/28/2014 by DICK BARCUS

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Hi, I tried to give you the numbers and website of the Sikaflex corporation to help answer your question, but I was not able to send you that info. I've used Sika 291 LOT on the wooden speedboats that I restore (Chris Craft/Century or similar)on decks and side planks when there could be a possibility years later when these planks may need to be removed, or when replacing several planks on an older bottom that eventually will need total replacement. However, when I replace inner and outer bottom planks, frames, keel or chines etc on a restoration that will be a permanent installation I use 3M 5200. Sikaflex 291 LOT is a product that I like and use and, to this date, have not had problems with. I suggest you check the Sikaflex website for information on uses with teak. I hope this has been helpful. Good Luck, Howard

Answered on 11/28/2014 by HOWARD LEHMAN
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Question

Can I use this to seal cracks in concrete sidewalk?

Asked on 05/23/2016 by Herb Grynke

Top Answer

I surpose you could but but I would think a it would be better to use a cement mix?I. If large cracks should be fine?

Answered on 05/23/2016 by CAPTDEAN KRAH
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Answer

While I have only used Sikaflex 291 LOT for marine applications,, I see no reason why it wouldn't work to seal cracks if the work area was cleaned, dried, and not subject to very much movement.

Answered on 05/23/2016 by BRUCE CONROY

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We have not used the Sikaflex 291 LOT for filling cracks in a concrete sidewalk, so i would not be able to provide an opinion either way on that question. We use it to fill cracks and checks in 6" x 6" pressure treated timbers that are part of the line of commercial wood playground equipment we design, manufacture, and sell.

Answered on 05/23/2016 by BRETT HADDAWAY

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I have only used it in deck seams but it would probably work in a sidewalk. I don't believe there would be any problems with adhesion and it should with stand the weather fine. It flows good from the tube so application should be fairly easy. I do believe Sika makes sealent strictly for cement joints.

Answered on 05/24/2016 by MACKIE BOAT WORKS
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Question

Is this the one with the Wheel mark or IMO approval?

Asked on 08/08/2016 by Jean Clarke

Top Answer

I honestly don't know

Answered on 08/08/2016 by BRIAN BRADLEY
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Answer

No idea on that. Sorry

Answered on 08/08/2016 by CAPTDEAN KRAH
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Question

what can i use for cement patching ?

Asked on 09/18/2015 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

3M 5200. It has 2 times the holding power of the Sika-Flex 291. We use it for patching just about anything.

Answered on 09/18/2015 by MACKIE BOAT WORKS
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Answer

I would not think this should be used for cement patching. This is an adhesive sealant, typically used to secure and seal two surfaces together.

Answered on 09/18/2015 by DAN FERGUSON
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