Free shipping on orders over $99.99! Don't miss out!
$32.40 In Stock
Interlux Bilgekote Bilge Paint
$32.40In Stock
Interlux Bilgekote Bilge Paint (Gallon)
Ask a Question
4.8
Based on 15 Reviews
  • 5 Star

    80%

  • 4 Star

    20%

  • 3 Star

    0%

  • 2 Star

    0%

  • 1 Star

    0%

Interlux Bilgekote Bilge Paint Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 22 Questions

Question

I have a 27 year old J24 that I'm working on updating and I'm wondering if Bilgekote would be a good choice to not only paint the small bilge area but the interior portion of the fiberglass hull and overhead areas? The J24 had a spatan interior which is basically painted fiberglass, so I would like to re-paint the interior and wondering if Bilgekote would be a good choice? I'd appreciate any feedback. Thanks, John

Asked on 11/25/2011 by John Zawacki

Top Answer

John, I only used it on the bilge of a 25 year old Ski Nautique, and my only concern would be that I'm not sure if it continued to have some type of odor, or that was the 25 year old bilge. My experience is that very few paints continue to have any odor after curing, but that would be my only concern. It is tenacious, and doesn't chip or scratch easily, and I have a pair of topsiders that I drug in the paint when I painted it three years ago. and it still sticks to them. Hope it helps, John

Answered on 12/04/2011 by JOHN WHITTINGTON
See More Answers (7)

Answer

Sorry for this late response but I just saw this email question. I used my bilgekote, gray, in the aft portion of my Tayana Vancouver 42 under the berth. It was very dirty and looked really bad. I loved the way it applied and the end job was very neat and tidy. if you can say that about a paint. Two coats would be my preference and I would highly recommend this paint to anyone. I don;t know why you couldn;t use it elsewhere, outside the bilge areas. It would most likely look good. Wally Alexander

Answered on 01/09/2012 by WALTER ALEXANDER

Answer

I race a J-24 of similar age so I am familiar with the configuration. I used Bilge-Kote in the bilge of my Wi8lbur 38 and was pleased with the ease of application and the way it covered however I have noticed that it has worn off in areas where I frequently step to access fuel filters. Ot does appear to be a hard enough finish to endure traffic.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by MCDONALD SHARPE & ASSOC

Answer

We have used the white bilgekote in the bilge as well as the interior of the hull for a while now. It works great. You will probably need two coats. We wash the surface as best we can first to get any dirt, oil and such off the surface, then let it dry thoroughly before painting. We also use bilgekote to seal the wood bulkheads and shelving that is in the lockers as well as any other surfaces in the machinery space, like the shelf the water heater is on. One thing we do prior to painting is to sand any sharp fiberglass that may be on the hull interior.

Answered on 11/29/2011 by CRAIG DEADY

Answer

John, Be warned. Bilgekote scratches easily. I would use Perfection (or some other tough 2-part epoxy paint) if you want it to last. Johnny

Answered on 11/29/2011 by JOHNNY HARRISON

Answer

John, The paint is plenty durable and provides a great hard finish when cured. I used it in the bilge area but if you are comfortable with the color, it should work fine. Good Luck - Rand in Michigan.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by RANDY MILLWOOD

Answer

John, Yeah, I think it would work fine. I painted my bilges about 2 years ago and I have an inboard engine so the bilge suffers from not only bilge water but oil, diesel, exhaust gas etc. and this paint has held up very well. I used the grey color and prepped the area as directed, I didn't use any primer and because of the restricted area used a brush, finish is ok but not bristol and probably just what you are looking for for your J24

Answered on 11/29/2011 by GAY BOYNTON

Answer

Hi John, I used the Bilgekote for the same purpose. The interior/bilge and overhead of a 1930's racing sloop. The paint doesn't look as good as the Brightside does but it has a special purpose reducing mildew. For my application it seems fine. With my floor boards in place not much is exposed to your eye until you climb around inside. The gray is not the best looking color, the white may be better for you.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by DAVID SELF
Answer Question

Question

do you need a primer paint before applying?

Asked on 04/20/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I have never used a primer before applying...however...I do believe that the manufacturer suggest using their primer

Answered on 04/21/2016 by MIKE SCANLAN
See More Answers (6)

Answer

You don't. The surface should be sanded to give the paint something to bite into.

Answered on 04/20/2016 by Mark Francis

Answer

I did not use primer and he's held up very good so far 3 yrs. just a good sanding and clean the surface

Answered on 04/20/2016 by JEFF FRUCI

Answer

I would suspect but i haven't use this as of yet

Answered on 04/21/2016 by RAYMOND KOLIANDER

Answer

I did not use a primer on fiberglass and have not seen separation or flaking. I cleaned the surface thoroughly before application and used a brush.

Answered on 04/20/2016 by DANIEL ZIMBRICH

Answer

I have applyed this paint to wood with no primer coat . I am building in the Norteast US outside with full exposure to all weather . Easy to work with I wish all paint performed as well

Answered on 04/20/2016 by CHARLES WESSEL

Answer

Nope, just a nice clean surface. I whipped mine down with Acetone, let it dry, and then painted it. This is as close to an epoxy as you can get. Amazing product.

Answered on 04/20/2016 by Mark Rafuse
Answer Question

Question

can this be applied to bare fiberglass?

Asked on 01/02/2016 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Yes Interlux Bilgekote may be applied to bare fiberglass. I used this product when replacing the deck of my '87 Bay- liner Capri three years ago. Areas of the bilge,battery box and storage hold were painted on raw fiberglass and have held fine. I would highly recommend this product for many applications.

Answered on 01/04/2016 by KEVIN RESER
See More Answers (5)

Answer

I applied this to my bilge area under a fuel tank that was replaced. Just make sure it's clean. It is holding up great so far(2yrs)

Answered on 01/02/2016 by JEFF FRUCI

Answer

Probably. I applied it to oily painted fiberglass with minimal prep, as in I wiped it down with a dry rag. It has adhered very well for 2 years now. Impressive stuff.

Answered on 01/02/2016 by GEORGE HEIN

Answer

Yes

Answered on 01/04/2016 by DENNIS RAY

Answer

Yes.

Answered on 01/03/2016 by CARL MOSBAUGH

Answer

Yes.

Answered on 01/03/2016 by CARL MOSBAUGH
Answer Question

Question

is it thick enough to hide imperfections?

Asked on 05/08/2013 by ron glad

Top Answer

I used white...needed 2 coats

Answered on 06/07/2013 by PHILIP G RASMUSSEN
See More Answers (5)

Answer

Ron, I don't think it will. I used it in my ski boat bilge because it was rough unfinished fiber glass. It didn't hide the imperfections of the rough fiber glass but it made for a smoother finish plus it's white making it easier to see things in the bilge. Hope it helps! Take care, Chris

Answered on 06/07/2013 by CHRIS CANNON

Answer

I guess it depends on the imperfection. The paint is very thick and does a great job covering bilge areas. If you are looking to make the bilge look like gelcoat, then this won't do that without filling, smoothing, sanding, and painting. I was very pleased with my bilge in my sailboat after using this.

Answered on 06/08/2013 by PAM LEAVITT

Answer

great stuff as durable paint but will not hide imperfections..... I used a fiberglass filler first then bilgekote....

Answered on 06/15/2013 by ERIC BINGAMAN

Answer

Yes it is. It will take a long time to cure because of it.

Answered on 06/07/2013 by IAN PENNINGTON

Answer

No

Answered on 06/08/2013 by ANTHONY PRISCO
Answer Question

Question

What exactly is the roll and tip method?

Asked on 12/01/2011 by Bill Dvorak

Top Answer

I did not use that with bilge coat. Just rolled it on. Since unseen area seemed to work well and looked good. On finish paints often people roll and then follow with a brush to even out and get rid of bubbles.

Answered on 12/01/2011 by CRAIG VOGT
See More Answers (5)

Answer

Hi Bill, When my husband and I painted our boat, we intepreted the term "roll & tip" to mean that one painter starts with a roller and applies paint broadly (after taping, of course), while the second painter comes along afterward with a foam "chip" and gently redistributes the paint to minimize the appearance of any brushstroke (or roller-stroke) lines. For the most part, it worked pretty well, but be careful: the darker the paint, the more coats you'll need, and make sure that the paint has had the chance to dry to the recommended consistency between coats--it will crack if you try to re-coat too soon. Good luck! Jenny

Answered on 12/01/2011 by JENNIFER KALMANSON

Answer

To roll and tip, you apply a coat with the roller and then lightly brush across the surface with a good quality brush. By just using the tips of the bristles, you spread out the little globs left by your roller, resulting in a fine grain application that (hopefully) melts together into a smooth coat of paint. Take a look at Interlux Brushing Liquid - it slows your drying time which allows the brush marks to melt. This will be especially important in warmer environments. Remember preparation is the key to your final product! Sand, clean, prime, sand, clean and then paint - If you're spending less than 80% of your time in preparation, you're messin' the boat.

Answered on 12/01/2011 by BARRY CUNNINGHAM

Answer

Bill, I am not 100% sure but I think the roll and tip method is referring to rolling the paint out and then back brushing the painted surface. i used this method and got a nice surface finish.

Answered on 12/05/2011 by PAUL BUCKLEY

Answer

Roll and top refers to first rolling on the paint with a roller, then tipping it out with a paint brush. This way you can apply a lot of paint in less time.

Answered on 12/01/2011 by CONNOR WALLACE

Answer

Bill, You first use a paint roller to roll out the paint in an even layer but because the roller leaves a "orange peel" pattern, you want to have another person next to you with a paint brush to lightly go over what you just rolled. If the paint is thinned right the lines the brush leaves behind will merge leaving a smooth glass finish. Hamish

Answered on 12/02/2011 by HAMISH RICHARDSON
Answer Question

Question

When using Interlux Bilgekote on a bare fiberglass west system epoxy bilge....do I need to primer before using Bilgekote? Jerry

Asked on 09/08/2015 by Jerry Readinger

Top Answer

If will probably stick with a good 80 grit sanding. But I also did an epoxy prime coat before using Bilgekote with great results.

Answered on 09/08/2015 by DEAN WILSON
See More Answers (4)

Answer

Dean, Thanks for your reply. Which primer did you use? Interlux Pre Kote? Jerry

Answered on 09/08/2015 by Jerry Readinger

Answer

Here is what Interlux recommends: CLEAR EPOXY: Begin by scrubbing well using soap and water and a stiff brush. Rinse with fresh water and allow to dry. Degrease by wiping with a rag soaked in Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202. Sand with 80 grade (grit) paper. Remove sanding residue. Apply one coat of Epoxy Barrier-Kote 404/414.

Answered on 09/09/2015 by Rick White

Answer

Yes, use Epoxy Primekote first.

Answered on 10/05/2015 by WINSTON VAN BRAAM

Answer

My experience is yes.

Answered on 09/29/2015 by WILLIAM MCBRINE
Answer Question

Question

What would be a good paint to use over a hollow wooden surfboard that has been epoxed/ fiberglassed? I want to paint a three color design on part of the board, followed by a final gloss coat of polyurethane.

Asked on 09/17/2014 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Bilgecoat is NOT appropriate for painting over epoxy/glass surfaces. I would look at a good marine enamel like Kirby.

Answered on 09/17/2014 by MARK BENNETT
See More Answers (4)

Answer

I'd first apply a under coat such as Interlux Bilge Coat . It gives real water proof base, then put on your finish coats of color.

Answered on 09/17/2014 by THOMAS DESFOSSES

Answer

I would lightly sand the epoxy, wipe down with a tack rag, prime with a suitable oil based primer, lightly sand again, followed by at least two coats of a good marine paint in your favorite color. Search the Jamestown video for a kiteboard project paint comparison with Petit easypoxy, Epifanes and Interlux Brightside. One part paints are easier to work with... Exposed Interlux bilgekote paint tends to turn slightly yellow over time. Good luck!

Answered on 09/17/2014 by DOUG ZIMMERMANN

Answer

Dear "Board Painter", I would highly recommend the Interlux Topside Polyurethane in the colors of your choice. We tow a WEST System lapstrake dinghy behind our sailboat every summer (an 8' Acorn). The sturdy little dink gets hauled up on the rocky Canadian North Channel shores for 7 weeks every summer. By late August it's pretty beat up! In the fall, we get out the WEST System, patch up the "dings", and apply a couple of coats of the Interlux Topside using a foam roller and badger hair brush to tip. What I like in this excellent paint is that it is truly "sandable" after application. No gumminess, yet - year after year - extremely sturdy. So - just like a great varnish - you can easily prep the previous finish then apply your fresh coats. Our dinghy looks spectacular every spring. Best of luck to you! Sailing family in Michigan

Answered on 09/17/2014 by BRADLEY MOFFATT

Answer

Why Bilgekote? Unless you're talking about painting the hollow inside of the surfboard? If you're talking about the exterior and you're looking for colors, would a hull paint work, followed by the polyurethane?

Answered on 09/17/2014 by STEPHEN LAEDTKE
Answer Question

Question

can it be sprayed on?

Asked on 08/07/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Bilgekote is an oil-based enamel so I presume you could spray it on. You'll have to thin it, of course, before spraying. I've used it to paint the interior of a dingy I built, and it works well for that application. I apply it with a roller and brush, and it levels out nicely.

Answered on 08/09/2012 by PETER SYVERSON
See More Answers (4)

Answer

This is a question best answered by Interlux tech (I have called them before and they are good!) I would assume that it could be sprayed with the right thinner. Out of the can it has a fairly thick consistency and even when brush applied, starts to tack up fairly quickly. You will get a good smooth finish either way.

Answered on 08/07/2012 by PHILIP G RASMUSSEN

Answer

I used a brush, sorry

Answered on 08/07/2012 by J WOODY GLENN

Answer

Sorry I don't know.

Answered on 08/07/2012 by JOSEPH STINE

Answer

If you thin it with interlux brushing liquid you shouldn't have a problem.

Answered on 08/07/2012 by JASON KROSS
Answer Question

Question

is this a oil base or a water base paint?

Asked on 07/29/2012 by mitchell a

Top Answer

It's oil based. Very easy to apply and spreads well.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by JOHN LEMON
See More Answers (4)

Answer

Oil base.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by GARY LINGENFELTER

Answer

hi Mitchell, Interlux Bilgecoat is a oil base paint. It comes under the group of alkyds. Very durable ,can withstand a lot of abuse . Look on the website of Essortment under " what is alkyd paint " and you will find everything you want to know.

Answered on 08/15/2012 by JOOP VANWESTERLOO

Answer

It's oil and it's a great paint. It holds up well.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by WEST CHOP CLUB C/O TIM HOYT

Answer

It is an oil based paint.

Answered on 08/13/2012 by RICHARD FICKEY
Answer Question

Question

I have a J24 sailboat and I was wondering if the Bilgekote product would be good for painting the interior, not only the small bilge area, but also the fiberglass inside hull and fiberglass headliner? The J24 has a spartan interior with the hull and headliner of painted fiberglass so I was wondering if the Bilgekote product would work for this application? Thanks, John Z.

Asked on 11/24/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Hi John, Yes the bilgekote worked very well on an older bare fiberglass bilge. The question is whether the boat will be dry sailed or kept in the water. I don't know any reason why it wouldn't work on other areas, and would definitely use it in the bilge areas and anywhere that may hold water. (ie, next to the mast step and below the lazerettes) I've seen the inside of a J24 painted with flat topside paint throughout and it worked very well but I would only recommend that if the boat is kept relatively dry. If you are looking to paint on top of wood, paint on a layer of epoxy prior to painting the wood or else the paint will eventually begin to "check" (crack like dried mud) Hope this helps,

Answered on 11/30/2011 by GILBANE #NAME?
See More Answers (4)

Answer

The bilgekote would work well for the application. I painted the whole floor of my checkmate wih the product and its holding up well. I would suggest adding some anti slip additive for the floors as it can get pretty slick when wet.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by EWA PALYS

Answer

To whom --- We bought a 16' Quachita, tri hull glass fishing boat that was very much "used". We were replacing the carpet and were advised to paint the inside walls also. This paint was easy to apply, covered well and sealed better than we ever expected. The glossy finish really dressed up the boat . We sold the boat a little more than a year later and the paint was still in excellent condition, no bubbles or peeling that I remember. So from my very limited experience I would think this would be a good paint for your use. I hope this helps you decide one way or another. Randy S.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by JOSEPH STINE

Answer

Bilgekote is a great product and my bilge on a Hunter 45 have been really easy to maintain. The paint has a very hard surface and stands to scrubbing very well.. As to the headliner and interior i used Interlux Briteside by roll and tip method and the results were great. I was really surprised since it was my first attempt at roll and tip. Shinet as a new car.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by WILLIAM A. SMITH

Answer

I used this product on plywood. Applied with a brush. The brush marks went away as the product dried. Looked good. Nice and uniform, But - it must be applied quickly. As it dries it sticks to the brush and globs up. I would not use it in a public area unless spray or roller proves to work better.

Answered on 11/30/2011 by DAVID STOKES
Answer Question
1 of 3