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Epifanes Clear High-Gloss Marine Varnish
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Epifanes Clear Gloss Marine Varnish
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Epifanes Clear High-Gloss Marine Varnish Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 133 Questions

Question

Folks, I need some help. I'm a hobby wood worker of almost every thing including Bows (archery) well I have ventured into wooden mailboxes and I am having a problem finding a clear coat that will hold up to the elements, oh yea I live in Texas hot. hot, hot w/high humidity and of coarse lots of sun. Tried "Deft Poly urethane" flaked,and peeled in 4 1/2 months. I was going to try minwax Spar urethane, but minwax told me i would need to re-coat every 9-18 months, seem excessive. Any help out there? I also want to use the same clear on my bows (multi- layers of wood and Fiberglass or E-poxy)

Asked on 08/20/2015 by Troy Mccoy

Top Answer

I use Epifanes varnish exclusively on the wood boats that I restore. There are 2 different "gloss" varnishes that Epifanes offers; "Epifanes High Gloss Clear" and "Epifanes Woodfinish Gloss". According to Epifanes, the Woodfinish Gloss can be re-coated within 72 hours without sanding between coats, whereas the High Gloss varnish needs sanding between coats. This allows the "Woodfinish Gloss" to be used as a "build coat", saving prep time between coats. I still sand between coats so I can get a smoother, more reflective surface. The "High Gloss" varnish should be used for the last final coats. Both varnishes have UV filters, but still the "High Gloss" should be used for the final coats. To avoid sun damage (peeling/flaking), the general "rule" is that 11-12 coats of varnish need to be applied on any wood surface that will see long exposure to sun. Epifanes says that its varnish can be sprayed, but I haven't tried that, as I don't have the proper equipment. Something that will be exposed to sun such as a mailbox, in my opinion, will need a marine varnish, with 11-12 coats of varnish, and then refresher coats every year or so as needed. It takes me at least 5 weeks to apply stain, sealer and 12 coats of varnish on a boat that I'm restoring. However, 6 or 7 coats of even Epifanes varnish could present problems in the hot sun. I have no other experience with any other product. Epifanes makes superior products. Good luck with your projects, Howard

Answered on 08/20/2015 by HOWARD LEHMAN
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Having a clear finish that will stand up to constant sun for years is not realistic. I have been very happy with Epifanes but keep it out of the sun as much as possible.

Answered on 08/20/2015 by VICTOR AAEN

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I get your point that no matter what clear I use will need maintenance, But, 4 1/2 months from the last product I used is ridiculous. I will be trying Epifanes. Thank you for your Help, Troy.

Answered on 08/20/2015 by Troy Mccoy

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I am a builder of wooden rowing shells. I use Epifanes clear gloss varnish on my hulls. Epifanes is far superior to the coatings you have used or plan on using. It is the best protective clear coating available. I know of no product that you can use to battle the elements that would not need maintenance. I would suggest 6 coats of varnish with a yearly light sanding and a new coat. Keep up with this regimen and your mailbox will remain bristol. If you discover a better method you will have a large audience eager to learn your method. God luck!

Answered on 08/20/2015 by STEVEN FERLAUTO

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Neal V. That was just the answer I was hoping for with examples and time lines I really appreciate that you took the time to answer my question. I live in Spring Tx. Just a little north of Houston so we share the same climate. I will definitely be using Epifanes for my wood projects. Thank you, Troy M.

Answered on 08/20/2015 by Troy Mccoy

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Thank you steven F. I have decided to use Epifanes. All of the responses have been very positive and I like what I hear. Thanks again, Troy.

Answered on 08/20/2015 by Troy Mccoy

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I use Epifanes Marine Varnish routinely on wooden objects destined for outside. I live in San Antonio where the Summers can be brutally hot, especially in August. I restored an oak screen door to our 1920's home about 12 years ago. I finished it with Epifanes per their recommended step-wise coating procedure. The door has been up ever since and looks as new as when it went up, even with it facing direct east sun. I built an outdoor leaf table a couple Summers ago to go outside on a patio next to a pool. Still looks brand new. I made a pair of pecan benches about 6 years ago. One is I our home sheltered from the sun and the other is in a vet's office where it sits in direct easterly sun everyday. Both still look brand new save for a few dents from some hard use. I also use this varnish for an oil mix I use as a wipe on finish for my other wood works. It's great and worth the cost.

Answered on 08/20/2015 by NEAL VAIL

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Everything I have used on my boat needs to be (at least) sanded a little and touched up every year. I live on the Virginia shores of the Chesapeake Bay where it is hot and humid and then freezing (in the teens) in the winters. Epifanes clear gloss has held up the best, but still needs touch up here and there every year or so. I like it better than anything else because of how it looks and that you don't have to sand between every coat like the old marine varnishes.

Answered on 08/20/2015 by ELIZABETH GRUBEN

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Neal V. I was wondering if you know if epifanes would be flexible enough for a Bow (Archery, long bow recurve etc...) some bows I just use an oil finish but some I like them to look like they are under a very thin piece of glass, A very nice gloss finish, But they obviously need to bend quite a bit. Any thoughts on this?

Answered on 08/20/2015 by Troy Mccoy

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Troy, I think its great that you are standing behind your work, and I don't think its silly at all. Are you planning on varnishing over the old, weathered varnish? I suggest that you remove the old finish to bare wood, restain (if you stained it), seal it (I use Pettit sealer, but you can use thinned down varnish, just follow the instructions provided by Epifanes). With each additional coat you thin less (use Epifanes brushing thinner), until last 4-5 coats are full strength. If you are OK sanding each coat (I use the maroon "scrubbies" found at hardware stores for many coats, extremely light on first thin coats) I suggest purchasing the Epifanes High Gloss varnish, its a little less expensive. If you want to avoid sanding for several coats, then you'll need to purchase both the High Gloss and Woodfinish varnishes. If you have any other questions, I'm happy to help. Best Regards, Howard Lehman

Answered on 08/20/2015 by HOWARD LEHMAN
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Question

After treat sitka spruce spar with two coats epoxy, how many coats of varnish?

Asked on 09/15/2011 by agnewhewes a

Top Answer

Hi Agnewhewes a, i would apply at least 4 coats of varnish, this is a great product and will hold up very well under any conditions.

Answered on 09/21/2011 by ZACK MEMBRINO
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I added 4 coats (spray) on my cedar strip/fiberglas kayak 2 years ago. Will probably add another this year.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by ROBERT GILSON

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Thanks! I hit five yesterday so I think that will be it. Hewes

Answered on 09/16/2011 by agnewhewes a

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Thanks to all. I hit five yesterday so I think that will be it. Hewes

Answered on 09/16/2011 by agnewhewes a

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Not sure if I know enough to answer this question with any value. I put 4 coats of Epifanes High Gloss varnish over epoxy coated marine ply on the transom of my 28 year old Avon inflatable 3 years ago and it worked well. It will need re-coating it this winter. I would be interested if someone knows more here as I just laminated a "banana" boom for my son's sabot out of Sitka spruce and will need to put varnish over epoxy on that too.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by CHRIS MAYS

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After 2 - 3 coats of epoxy well sanded 4 to 7 coats of Epifanes - then annual maintenance of sanding plus 2 - 3 coats depending on how much sanding was needed.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by WILLIAM ROBERTSON IV

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maybe 4-5 coats after epoxy - if the spar is completely encapsulated with epoxy, watch for rot in 12-15 years...

Answered on 09/15/2011 by KRISTOFER YOUNGER

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I am no expert, but think the answer depends on the environment you are using the item you are coating. For most surfaces exposed to sun and weather, a minimum of three coats, and for marine applications, another one or two might be advisable. In general, I don't think the undercoating of epoxy should influence how many coats of varnish you use.

Answered on 09/15/2011 by PETER HOWARD

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I like to use 3-4 coats of Interlux 1026 sealer and 15-17 coats of Epifanes clear varnish on Mahgany , complete white out sanding after every 3-4 coats

Answered on 09/15/2011 by DUDLEY ROBERTSON

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Generally, 6 coats of finish is recomended for the best coverage.

Answered on 09/17/2011 by TIM STALEY
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Question

Can the Epiphanes clear gloss varnish be thinned with regular mineral spirits (for brushing)?

Asked on 09/17/2012 by Chris Lemay

Top Answer

Thanks for the info, and tip on alcohol wipe down!

Answered on 09/20/2012 by Chris Lemay
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Thanks Thomas, sounds like their thinner is worth it. I like things to look great when I'm done and keep looking that way.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by Chris Lemay

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I have thinned it with mineral spirits with no observable problems. I have not done a side-by-side comparison.

Answered on 09/21/2012 by EDVIN FARINHOLT

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Chris: Nobody is more suspicious of modern businesses than me--I expect to get ripped off at every turn. Check out the width of a roll of toilet paper, as one example of this perfidity. Been shrinking steadily so a "roll" is no longer a roll. Epifanes is a terrific varnish and you get a good deal wehen you buy it because it comes at 50% solids which is much higher than competing brands. Thus the amount you buy becomes much larger when reduced for application. But you gotta respect the impact of the thinner on brush or spray performance. Like you I would think in terms of standard ie lower price thinners. But I find that the Epifanes brushing (or spraying-yes you can!!) thinners are worth the extra $$$. When thinned properly with these special blends the varnish will flow and wet better than it would with just mineral spirits. Pay attention to the thinning recommendations--something like 25% for first application on bare wood, to promote deep penetration and adhesion, dropping to 10-15% for topcoats on existing varnish.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by THOMAS STEARNS

Answer

Paint thinner works ok. If you are really serious about the quality of your results use Interlux 333 or the thinner that epifanes sells. Always use de-natured alcohol to wipe down prior to application, it has no oils in it and promotes adhesion

Answered on 09/20/2012 by ATLANTIC SPECIALITIES

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You're more than welcome, Chris. A quart of the thinner will last for several liters of the varnish because of the dilution factor so added cost for the special thinner in pennies/sq ft is trivial. I use a small roller if there's any amount of flat surface to cover. Did the deck area of a 14' sailboat this week--probably less than 12 sq ft total so cost of throw-away roller was significant but it's important to get the varnish onto the surface, uniformly and fully wetted, FAST!!, then leave it alone so it can smoothen out. A roller leaves very tiny marks or imperfections in the surface which quickly disappear and coating thickness tends to be more uniform than with a brush. Plus faster.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by THOMAS STEARNS

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Epifanes has a specific thinner, but gum turpentine will work fine. I would not use regular paint thinner.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by MICHAEL E. NEGLEY

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Yes I have done so many times. If starting on bare wood I will use a 25% varnish to thinner, then in subsequent coats use less and less thinner.

Answered on 09/21/2012 by PAUL MAC MENAMIN

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Yes absolutely. It is in fact recommended! I routinely thin to 50% w/ pure min spirits or naptha for the first 2-3 coats then remainder thinned to 75% varnish / 25% solvent. Epifanes sells a brushing thinner that works really well too.

Answered on 09/20/2012 by JENNIFER PIVOVAR
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Question

i really would like to obtain the finish that boats decks have(high gloss) for my deck on my home(not a boat). my deck has been stained. Could i use this product and obtain the look i want. High traffic area. Or can i mix this in with my stain?

Asked on 05/03/2012 by Gloria Zubko

Top Answer

Yes, Epifanes is about as good as varnish gets and it can be used for any exterior application. However, I would caution you against using a gloss varnish on your deck for two reason. First, it can be very slippery especially if there is any ice or water present. This is why it is never used on walking surfaces of boats. Second, varnish takes a lot of maintenance and numerous initial coats to get a good finish. When it goes bad, and it will, it needs to be taken down to bare wood. If you want a high quality finish consider Cetol with some none skid aggregate added it is far easier to maintain.

Answered on 05/05/2012 by WILLIAM BABER
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Answer

I have not used this product in a high traffic area but I have used it on the frame work of a covered deck. It holds up beautifully and might need a touch up every 3 years or so. Make sure you follow directions and start off with product that's been thinned to a 50% mix for you 1st coat. 2nd coat you can move up to 75% and 3rd can go on at full strength. Also I roughed the surface with a greenie pad after each coat dried overnight or in very high humidity you may need a couple of days for it to properly dry. Also try not to apply in direct sunlight, cooler afternoon/evening applications go on easier and more evenly as the product tends to dry slower. Hope this helps. Don

Answered on 05/03/2012 by DONALD RIGGS

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First of all, a boat DECK would never have a high gloss finish - it's slippery and too brittle for the inevitable flexing. If your house decking is exposed to rain, sun, and (or) subject to hard contact, I would not use Epifanes Gloss as a finish because it will be extremely slippery when wet and will not hold up well - it will begin to crack & lift in a few months even if several coats are applied. There are finishes formulated specifically for exterior decking that would be more sensible and cheaper.

Answered on 05/03/2012 by ROBERT BECKSTEAD

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It gives a beautiful, rich finish. I have used it on some steps on my boat that receive high traffic & it's held up really well. You do need to apply several coats & sand very lightly between coats, then wipe with acetone or some paint prep cleaner prior to application. I use a throw away foam brush, but you could use a foam roller for your deck. Bill

Answered on 05/04/2012 by WILLIAM LONGSTRETH

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Used as a topcoat it would probably deliver the gloss providing the surface of your deck is smooth. However it would be very slippery in wet conditions. I've never seen a gloss finish used on an exterior boat deck - probably for that reason.

Answered on 05/03/2012 by J A KENSINGER

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My sense is that the Epifanes is not a very durable finish to be walked on; rather it is excellent to use on furniture etc. which does not see that kind of wear. For areas on a boat that gets walked on people recommend either clear epoxies or two part polyurethane varnishes.

Answered on 05/04/2012 by HANS EGGEN

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gloria I do not recomend you mix the two together. Your deck surface must be very smooth for the varnish to be at it's best. You must apply at least four coats(sanded between each) for the finish you want also rubber shoes do best on this surface. High heels or leather soles will mare or slip. Sun will penetrate the surface and dry out the oils(cracking). We stain our wooden house deck with a water based stain. Looks good for two years if you apply two coats. John

Answered on 05/03/2012 by JOHN TUCKER

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You certainly could use this product, but I'd shy away from gloss varnish on your deck as a matter of safety. I imagine it would be very slippery when wet, as is the case for cap rails on boats (not something normally walked on). Keep in mind that 10+ coats will be needed if the deck is exposed to direct sunlight, and a couple of coats a year to keep the UV protection up. I've not had any experience mixing stain with Epifanes. Suggest you call the US importer; they were very helpful with questions I had.

Answered on 05/03/2012 by KEN GROSS

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Gloria the varnish you asked about will give a very glossy finish providing the wood you choose is smooth and hard.Coat 6-8 times, be sure to dry hard between coats . you'll be contented. Good luck.

Answered on 05/03/2012 by WESLEY HIGGINS
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Question

Can this finish be applied over stains such as Minwax?

Asked on 08/17/2011 by Taylor Barnett

Top Answer

Have not tried this but would suggest doing a sample to see how it turns out.

Answered on 08/18/2011 by WOLF EVERT
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It should do fine over a stain, but as with any application of this varnish, I would thin the first and second coats about 50% before laying on the first full coat. Give it a full day between coats.

Answered on 09/18/2011 by DICK MCCRILLIS

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Hi taylor, this is a great product i have used it on my boat and will outlast anything you can buy at the local hardware store. The spar vanish from my local hardware store did'nt even last one season. and yes this product will work well over any stain as long it has dried well. hope this helps. Zack.

Answered on 08/19/2011 by ZACK MEMBRINO

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You can, however you need to compensate for some leaching of the stain due to solvents in the varnish particularly with the first 2 or 3 cut coats. In general, you'll want to stain about 2 shades darker than your final desired shade. You should experiment first with a few different depths of stain shade on the same wood as you'll be varnishing. Start by allowing the stain to set as completely as possible (5 days at this time of year). Then apply a 50/50 coat of varnish and turpentine or Epifanes brushing thinner. Let this set for about 12 hours and apply a 75/25 coat of varnish/thinner, then a coat that is cut 10-15%. Once that is cured (about a day) you can sand very lightly and begin build-up.

Answered on 08/18/2011 by TODD PARMINGTON

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Edward- Thanks for the advice. I'll definitely look into the Interlux product.

Answered on 08/23/2011 by Taylor Barnett

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Hello Taylor, I have used the Epifanes varnishes on unstained cherry and stained pine and sapele with great results in all cases. The stains that I used were the Minwax Sedona Red and Red Mahogany. Good luck with your project. Pierre

Answered on 08/18/2011 by PIERRE DE SMUL

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Talyor, I have not applied Epifanes over minwax products but I think it should not be aproblem as the minwax is an oil based product and as I remember you can use mineral spirts as an alternative to thinning the Epifanes varnish. I used the Epifanes product on my last project. It has great color and leveling features however it tends to be soft when cured than other varnish products. Even after curing you can see tape marks and finger prints embedded into the surface, I had always used Interlux Schooner varnish 96 which was a great product. I switch to Epifanes because I was told that Interux changed the formula of the 96 and the reviews were not great. I read that the 96 was recently approved with another formula change so I recently purchased a quart of the 96 and was happy with teh results and was definately harden than teh Epifanes. If I were to do it over again I would use the Interlux Schooner varnish 96. Good luck with your project

Answered on 08/23/2011 by EDWARD A MCDONALD

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Over stains yes but ry a small area 1st

Answered on 08/25/2011 by CARY DELOYE

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Yes, varnish can be applied over stain. Follow the directions on the can.

Answered on 08/18/2011 by GUY JOHNSON
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Question

Have 4 large presanded custom made mahogany doors (with a lot of glass)...please help me with what is the best product to use? Can I use minwax to get the color I want and then a epifanes as the top coat. Will it be too shiny for a residential door? Any advise appreciated. Thanks

Asked on 06/23/2014 by c reid

Top Answer

CR, Minwax makes a lot of different products. You can use a stain to color the mahogany (I can't imagine why you want to...) but don't use one of their combo stain-varnish products. The Epifanes has a bright gloss finish. Some like this look, some don't. The benefit of the Epifanes is the very good UV resistance. If the doors are in direct sun, you want good UV resistance so you don't have to re-varnish the doors often. You will need to apply several coats of Epifanes to build up a good finish. Get a piece of scrap from your door builder and try a sample before you go at the 4 doors. Post a photo when you're done!

Answered on 06/23/2014 by SCOTT SEUBERT
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Thanks. So you would not use it on a exterior/interior door?

Answered on 06/23/2014 by c reid

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There is really no reason to be using Epiphanes high gloss varnish inside. It is formulated for marine environments, has high level UV filters and is very glossy which sounds like something you might be trying to avoid. It most certainly can not be used on top of a minwax finish! My suggestion would be to use a polyurethane for those mahogany doors. You question implies that you are trying to get a certain color? But mahogany has its own beautiful color and the polyurethanes will bring that out. Also, you will have your choice of finishes - gloss, semi-gloss, satin and flat. If you have a spare, similar piece of mahogany lying around you can experiment with the finish you like. I should think the satin would be a nice choice but you will see the differences.

Answered on 06/23/2014 by WILLIAM BENSON

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I would and have used it on interior/exterior doors. It is hands down the best varnish available.

Answered on 06/23/2014 by RICHARD CAMPBELL

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In that case, Epiphanes would be the correct choice for the exterior exposure. You can still choose to use a satin finish poly on the inside faces if you want a softer look.

Answered on 06/26/2014 by WILLIAM BENSON

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The Epifanes is the "shiniest" varnish I have seen and I like that. You can always lightly buff it with nylon "steel wool" to reduce the shine and make it into more of a satin finish if need be. Since you need to use several coats, use gloss until the last coat, then choose whether to finish with it or switch to semi-gloss or satin. It has great UV protection.

Answered on 08/13/2014 by PATRICK MCNAMARA

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The doors are facing the exterior on one side of them and interior on the other. The exterior ones are completely exposed to the elements....

Answered on 06/23/2014 by c reid

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If the doors have a lot of glass, sheen should not be an issue but it is a taste /preference. Remember that the higher the sheen the more imperfections become visible. You say the doors are pre-sanded but to what quality? Do not try to rub out the sheen of Epifanes. It is too soft. I've tried and it doesn't work. I use Epifanes in my furniture finish.

Answered on 06/23/2014 by RICHARD CAMPBELL
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Question

Can this be used for an indoor bathroom wooden floor? or will it be too soft / slippery?

Asked on 10/15/2013 by olivia mak

Top Answer

Really appreciate everyone for taking time to answer! Alot of house websites suggested you could use spar varnish, but clearly there are lots of 'cons' also. Really appreciate the expert and detailed responses. Thanks so much!

Answered on 10/15/2013 by olivia mak
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Yes, this varnish can be used on an indoor bathroom floor but some considerations are: this high gloss varnish would be very slippery (that's why, on boats, it is never used as surface to be walked on) and varnish, by nature, is softer than say, polyurethane so anything dropped on the floor would mar it. Over time you would need to resurface the floor - a difficult job in a bathroom. This varnish would be perfect, however, for trim and accent pieces in a bathroom. I hope this helps,

Answered on 10/16/2013 by WILLIAM BENSON

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I would not varnish a bathroom floor because it would be very slippery. If you are starting with bare wood, you could use a clear epoxy coating and sprinkle a non-skid compound on it. In an outdoor setting, epoxy needs a varnish to protect it from the sun's UV, you do not need it inside.

Answered on 10/15/2013 by SCOTT SEUBERT

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It's a great product for protecting wood, but I think your concerns are right on. It is designed to accommodate the natural flexing of wood and, being somewhat soft, doesn't fare well with bumps from hard objects. A high gloss product, it is very slippery when wet. I'd look elsewhere.

Answered on 10/15/2013 by JAN WITTING

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Not the right product for traffic. There are many traditional and water based polyurethanes that are far harder.

Answered on 10/15/2013 by TED ZOLI

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It could be but I would not. It will be slippery when wet and it is fairly soft under foot traffic in my opinion. A better product would be epoxy with a clear hardener such as West 205/207. While significanlty harder, it will also be slipery when wet.

Answered on 10/15/2013 by RANDY POOLE

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Greetings, Marine varnishes can be very slippery when used on flat surfaces, especially if they are wet. Satin can be just as slippery since it is the surface that is smooth, even though the sheen is not as glossy. Decks and bathroom floors that will have wet use can use an oil based finish such as any of the teak oils, but there an be some residue on bare feet. Antiiskid additives will appear cloudy or rough, and may not be the appearance you desire. You also need to consider if you will have the wood laid tight enough to not allow water to seek under and watermark it, or tolerate expansion by remaining floating and a good gap at all edges under the trim. If you are going to have non slip rugs for safety and have the edges showing the bright wood, you may get by with a satin finish. Safety is the primary concern with these surfaces.

Answered on 10/15/2013 by CHRISTIAN DAHL

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This is a high-gloss varnish. Assuming your surface is smooth and well-sanded, the finish will be quite slick. My bigger concern is that this product has capabilities one seldom needs for an interior floor, like UV resistance, which makes it a relatively expensive and labor-intensive choice for this use.

Answered on 10/15/2013 by JIM ALLEN
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Question

How good is this product for finishing the exterior surface of wooden church entrance doors exposed to afternoon sun???

Asked on 05/19/2012 by Ronald Petroni

Top Answer

Refinished the oak door on our double Brownstone, it gets partial sun throughout the day, filtered by a tree. After three years it has held up beautifully, just don't skimp on coats. I am not a professional but I very much like this product.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by ALEXANDER L. WALLACE
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I apply 6 coats of gloss and 1 topcoat of matte finish by epifanes. The varnish holds up very well, but it will need to be recoated in several years (depending on uv strength). I will be recoating 8 doors this year that were done 4 years ago. These doors have alot of afternoon sun. The bottom of the doors start to break down first and if I recoat soon enough, I won't need to refinish.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by RANDY WARNER

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1. If the issue is longevity, Epifanes will last as well as anything, and better than most. That means a few years between refinishings. If you're imagining a permanent or even 10-year "fix," I don't think there's any such thing. Well, maybe some 2-part polyurethane finishes last longer, but they're twice as expensive, and if they're not applied just right on a perfectly prepared surface, it could fail in LESS time than Epifanes, and be harder to fix/recoat. 2. As to aesthetics, I like glossy varnish on my boat's trim, but if it was my church door, i wouldn't want it glossy. I recommend satin or matte finish.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by KIM APEL

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Ron, I bought this product now a couple of times and i am very pleased with the results. I use it specificaly only on my wooden doors and every fall i give them a fresh coat after lightly sanding first. Its not cheep but then i always beleive that you get what you pay for. People are always complementing me on my doors and their high gloss finish.I stick with a product i like, hope this helps. Richard

Answered on 06/20/2012 by RICHARD PETTY

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I used it on white oak boards that fit into a metal frame to make a nice garden bench. It looked great the first year, but it only lasted two years.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by FRED SILVA

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I've used it on my 42' Krogen teak brightwork the past few years with very good results. It stands up to the rigors of sun, salt and driving rain. My preference is to take wood down to bare wood, sand, apply 2 coats of sealer followed by 6 coats of Epifanes Gloss - then sand and recoat annually. The finish retains both gloss and depth. Hope this helps.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by KEN JOHNSTON

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I would highly recommend this product. The only time it breaks down in tough environments like on the topside of a sailboat, is when the finish is damaged by a blow or scratch. Be sure to remove the locksets so that the finish can go underneath. Once moisture gets behind it, it can discolor and lift, so it's best not to have a distinct break of finish exposed.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by DAVID POPKEN

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Ronald, I used this product on interior railing on our stairs. I have not used it on the exterior yet. The produce is thicker than other Varnish. It has worked well for our application. John A.

Answered on 06/19/2012 by JOHN C. ADAMS FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CH
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Question

I have a17' wherry that I am about to complete, I used West Systems on the boat and now need to finish with some kind of varnish. what do you recommend and how much will I need?

Asked on 02/21/2012 by Paul Beckett

Top Answer

I use epifanes on all my boats. It must be thinned correctly it builds up nice and provides a great finish that will hold up better than most other varnish.

Answered on 02/21/2012 by JAY GRAHAM
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Use Epifanes. One quart. Sand, clean, clean, clean. Varnish in shade. Paint into the wet varnish and feather the brush by lifting very slowly. Buy the best varnish brush you can afford. Clean well. Clean with laquer thinner after use and before use again. Best varnish out there.

Answered on 02/21/2012 by ROBERT VINSON

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Thank you very much Paul

Answered on 02/22/2012 by Paul Beckett

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Fixing the typo, Thank you for your help Paul

Answered on 02/21/2012 by Paul Beckett

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Thank you for your advise Paul

Answered on 02/21/2012 by Paul Beckett

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Over many years I have refinished 20+ mahogany boats. I'll admit, I'm not a professional or expert. However, after talking with restorers and owners of craft with superior finishes I tried Epifanes. It is superior by all measures. I finally have a finish I can be proud of. Be sure and thin and adhere to instructions.

Answered on 02/21/2012 by PRESTON STARK

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I have nothing to compare the epifane product to. I have used it on three boats that I built and I am happy with the results. Going over westsystem epoxy you will need a minimum of three coats for uv protection with six coats being the preferred number. For three coats I would start with one gallon and I would also thin this product with the brushing thinner. I would reccoment rolling with a thin foam roller the then tipping off with foam brushes.

Answered on 02/21/2012 by JACK GERBER

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Thank you for our help Paul

Answered on 02/21/2012 by Paul Beckett
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Question

what is curing time for marine spar varnish indoors?

Asked on 12/20/2011 by mike spratt

Top Answer

I let it dry overnight

Answered on 12/22/2011 by ROBERT VAN BECELAERE
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24 hours on average, but that is also dependent on your humidity conditions.

Answered on 12/20/2011 by ADAM VENTI

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Been a couple of years. Used this on our front door, and the product worked great and has held up well. It didn't take so long that I would remember how long it took to dry, but would imagine it would set up over night.. Good luck

Answered on 12/20/2011 by ALAN SMITH

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When I use it after stripping exterior doors, it will usually take 24 hrs for curing. Air movement and humidity can affect the drying time.

Answered on 12/20/2011 by RANDY WARNER

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I would say you're safe at 24 hrs It's a little slower dry time, which all the long lasting products are

Answered on 12/21/2011 by DONOVAN KOSTRON

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To my best recollection, it dried very well overnight to slightly tacky., and in two days it was well dried! Wayne

Answered on 12/20/2011 by WAYNE WALTER

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My recollection is hazy, but I do recall that it took somewhat longer than the common brands to cure.

Answered on 12/20/2011 by MICHAEL ZEMSKY

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At 70 degrees f and normal humidity Epifanes will cure to the touch in 6 to 10 hours. It CAN be sanded after 24 hours, however it will continue to shrink into the pores and harden for months. I usually try to wait a few days between coats as the finish will cut much easier when well dried. If you start to sand and the sandpaper loads up or little balls of finish start to form stop and let it cure some more. The normal application for bare wood is a 50/50 thinned mix for the first coat or two, depending on the porosity of the wood and then 60/40 , 70/30 and so on. Depending on temperature and other factors affecting dry time as well as the type of applicator even the final top coats may need thinned.

Answered on 12/20/2011 by ATLANTIC SPECIALITIES
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