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Interlux Epoxy Primekote
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Interlux Epoxy Primekote
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Interlux Epoxy Primekote Customer Questions and Answers

10 of 40 Questions

Question

I have fiberglass hatch covers from a Grady White 20' walk a round 25 years old - 1986 mfg. I have sanded them down with 220 grit sand paper and washed them off with the garden hose - lot of water pressure to clean off sanding dust, also used paint thinner to clean then after water wash,then cleaned with soft dry cloth.All ready for painting now.The marina paint shop wants 250.00 each to paint these- i have seven off this boat.Very cold here in Ct., the only place i have to paint them is my basement next to the oil fired furnace which is on this time of year.I don't have a spray booth in my basement so i will do them with a roller and brush, primer & paint. They are off white in color and will be painted off White.Help me with what paint & primer to use with out blowing up the house painting next to the furnace?? Or should i have the marina do it and take me to the cleaners? Please Help Me With This Mess. Thank You Again. Tell me everything i need to do this job and i will give you

Asked on 12/27/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

No, you can't. I'm glad you are asking. Industrial marine paints have serious solvents. Fume as well as fire risks are substantial and can't be controlled sufficiently in your situation. Your only options are latex or water-based acrylic, both of which are fine for weather resistance but not for abrasion resistance. Frankly, it is wiser to wait until spring with safe and good drying conditions. If the hatches are already off and your boat remains safe now, why rush it?

Answered on 12/28/2011 by JOANN TOPOLSKI
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Answer

How big are these hatch covers? $250 each sounds pretty steep. Crazy steep in fact, especially since most of the work is in the prep and you've done that. I don't think you'll find any paint that won't blow up your house if there's a flame nearby. Even if the paint doesn't, the thinner will. At any rate, I wouldn't risk it. The garage maybe, but not the house. Based on the price they quoted you, I'm assuming you're planning on using a 2 part LPU. II've rolled and tipped that in 40 degrees with good results using Epoxy Primekote and Perfection. There are a ton of DIY instructional videos to roll and tip LPUs on youtube, many from Jamestown Dist. Between youtube and google you'll find a lot of info on how to do it and what you'll need. One tip I can give you is that solvent resistant foam brushes left a better finish after tipping than expensive badger hair brushes. They may work for pros, but they didn't work for me. You'll also need foam rollers. I bought 9" ones from a big box store and cut them in half with a razor knife to use on a 4" roller frame. Once you get everything together you should be able to do all 7 at once. Between the primer and topcoats you should be able to get the job done in 3 days so you can get started when the temp is reliably above 40 and still have plenty of boating season left.

Answered on 12/27/2011 by MATT ZAREMSKI

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My son and I are building a 12' catboat (stitch and glue plywood with fiberglass overlay) and are preparing the fiberglass now for painting. We are using the Jamestown Epoxy Primer to good effect. Be advised that this two part primer produces very strong fumes, and I think doing it near your furnace would be catastrophic. It's pretty cool here now in Houston, and our solution might be one for you to employ. We put together a paint booth composed of tarps that I bought at Home Depot. They come in heavy duty and light duty, get the latter; a 12' x 16' tarp is about $35. Using some 2 x 4's, scissors, and a staple gun, you can make a small paint booth outside your house and heat it with a cheap little electric heater sufficient to bring the temp up to around 55 F. while the primer cures. I would strongly suggest getting a mask that handles vapors because the fumes are dangerous for your lungs. Also, when you order the primer, make sure you order the 2333N solvent too, which is used to dilute the primer that comes almost gelatinous in the can. One can has provided enough diluted primer to cover the bottom and sides of our 12' catboat twice. Use that to judge your needs for the hatch covers. I'll bet you can buy the whole deal-- paint, tarp, heater, and wood to construct the tent for much less than what the marina wants for one hatch cover. Just be sure to do all this OUTSIDE! It's so messy for the neighbors when a house blows up.

Answered on 12/27/2011 by CHRISTIAN SEGER

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I used Interlux epoxy Prime Coat on my fiberglass Poke Boat (kayak) which was beginning to craze. It went on well and has lasted for several years of use and exposure to North Carolina summer sun without ill effects. Joh Boeckel

Answered on 12/28/2011 by JOHN BOECKEL

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I would not recommend doing this next to the furace. Surely you can find a space in the house that is warm for something as small as hatch covers. Perhaps the kitchen counter top. Just send your wife off with a gift card to go shopping . It is easier to get forgiveness than permission anyway. Put a blue tarp down and work on top of that. Work slowly and carefully and you won't make a mess. Use a little 3 inch foam roller with a small plastic roller pan. I promise you it will work just fine. Be sure that the paint and cure has been inside and is warm before you mix. Pay attention to all the mixing instructions. For small batches I use small plastic drinking cups then pore all into a plastic yogart or coffee container to mix well. Let it have the proper induction time. Use the little foam roller and tip it with a brush to get the bubbles out. You can do this and it will turn out fine. If this was here in my shop I would be happy to do it for $40.00 so $500 is way out of line. Capt Dan

Answered on 12/27/2011 by DAN HOUSTON

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I used this PrimeKote on my 1969 Marinette hull and painted it with Interlux topside epoxy paint...but I did it outdoors. The Primekote and the final top paint was done using the roll & tip method and really does a nice job. As an old timer boat guy once told me..."you're not putting it in a museum, just paint it and use it". That being said, the paint job using "roll & tip" method worked real well. Google it and you'll see how it's done. Basically roll on the paint (primer or finish coat) and "tip" which is blend the edges together with a real fine haired brush to eliminate roller edge marks. The Interlux top paint flows together quite well and with a brush you can eliminate most roller marks. Just don't do a too large and area before "tipping". Hatch covers should not have that problem. If you crack a window open and stay at least ten or fifteen feet away from the furnace, you should be fine. Just keep the lid on the paint as much as possible. The thinners for clean-up are the real issue. I'd clean the brushes in the garage or outside...that's the real flame issue. And keep the rags outside or in the garage too. The thinners really smell and are highly flammable. Hope this helps.

Answered on 12/27/2011 by JIM DEVER

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I primarily use this material to prime my fiber glass model airplane. I tried once to paint in the basement but never again due very strong fumes and will give you migrane headache. The question is, " Help me with what paint & primer to use with out blowing up the house painting next to the furnace" I don't think it's going to blow up your when using this material. I don't really know the properties, but if we mixed them part "A" and part "B" outside your house , not close to the furnice you should be OK. Wear a good resperator if you going to do the job in the basement. I hope i answered your question Eddie Lozano

Answered on 12/27/2011 by LOZANO EDDIE

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I'm painting a 1987 Jefferson 42 that has been outside in Florida its whole life. Since surface preparation takes up 95 percent of the time and effort I recommend you wait for better weather and do the priming and painting out doors. I prop my small pieces up on "painters pyramids." The best application technique I have found is to use the small (1" dia) ultra smooth foam rollers and put multiple coats of paint on very thin. (I buy the contractors multi pack and change the rollers every 1/2 to 1 hr.) Use the organic fumes mask, safety glasses, wear protective gloves, a long sleeve shirt and long pants. If you overcoat in less than 24hrs there is no need to sand between coats. Be sure to follow the recommendations about shading the surface if possible and thinning . I would strongly recommend against using the primer and paint indoors especially near a furnace. The fumes will probably permeate the whole house. (Read the MSD's on both the primer and paint concerning toxicity. You can get them off the Interlux web site. Adequate ventilation and protection gear are very important for personal safety.) I actually mix batches of primer and paint in a 3 car garage with the doors open and a large ventilation fan. I wear a 3M organic fumes mask. But when I take off the mask the fumes are pretty strong and take a long time to dissipate entirely. Spreading primer or paint with a roller in an enclosed area will make the outgassing worse . I don't know what concentration level is explosive, but I would recommend only mixing and using the primers and paints outdoors away from opn flames. I hope this answers some of you questions.

Answered on 12/27/2011 by CHRISTOPHER PLONSKY

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For $250/ea I'd absolutely do them myself, there is no way they can justify that price as I'm sure they would set up and do them all at one time. The Interlux epoxy is very easy to use and it has quite an amount of thickener in the formula which allows for easy fairing of minor scratches etc. Both the primer and the single part epoxy are flammable so don't be dumb and do this around an open flame. For what you would pay the boat yard to do this you can easily justify paying someone to use their garage for two or three days. Use an electric space heater to warm the place up to about 70 or 75 deg. You should also invest in an "organic" dust mask to eliminate dying brain cells from the fumes. Put an ad for the garage on "craig's list".

Answered on 12/28/2011 by GRANT WORSLEY
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Question

Do you have to tip the primer if you are rolling it on as and undercoat?

Asked on 04/24/2015 by Jim Evans

Top Answer

I roll then tip to reduce sanding between coats. Tipping leaves a finer finish. I have found that I can leave the raw surface with 120 grit before the first coat, then 220 after the first coat. After the 2nd coat I go with 320 or 400 before applying the top coats.

Answered on 04/25/2015 by KARL MCENTIRE
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Not tipping will leave a much rougher surface as this material does not self-flatten well. When sanding you will be removing much of your primer, so more coats will be needed. The time spent in tipping will be more than made up in the time spent in sanding and additional coats.

Answered on 04/26/2015 by STEVE BEMIS

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I did not, as you will sand it down when it dries. I would not wait too long however to sand, as I seem to recall it gets harder the longer it sits. I believe I sanded th e next day.

Answered on 04/24/2015 by TIM BUTLER

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reducing instuctions are on the label. Not much help when ordering. I used a brush and as thick as this product is rolling would not be recommended. The product is great when you get it placed I am happy with the results.

Answered on 04/24/2015 by LARRY BEST

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You could...it would not hurt...it can get a little orange-peely if you don't

Answered on 04/24/2015 by MICHAEL KOSS

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The primer drys quite hard, and so is some amount of work to sand. Also, it doesn't flow out real well when tipped. So, I found it easiest to roll and not tip - the orange peel texture left by the roller was easier to sand smooth than the brush marks from tipping.

Answered on 04/24/2015 by CRAIG BRYANT

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This experience has me experimenting with different techniques. Since the prime coat is the foundation for your paint, it is at this time you will realize a " garbage in- garbage out" situation. Tipping with a brush did not work for us on primer. I had success with a 4" poly. roller. After developing some knack, this left me a consistent lightly textured finish that sanded out easily. You wont be able to get away without sanding. Found it easier to lightly sand the slight orange peel than cutting through brush marks. I used Ace Hardware Zinzer 1/4" nap poly rollers. I even had a separate tray of thinned out primer to finish roll to improve finish. May try the same on my last two coats of perfection this weekend. Good luck. Bob.

Answered on 04/24/2015 by ROBERT SZWAYA

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Thanks guys . . . I think I will roll and sand and save my tipping for the finish coat of Brightside.

Answered on 04/24/2015 by Jim Evans
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Question

I have a large sculpture made of epoxy. I want to paint it black with a interlux poly product. Do I need to use the epoxy primer? Thanks.

Asked on 05/01/2013 by Robert Porreca

Top Answer

Thank you. I was not aware of the flattening additive and now I plan to us it. Sanding this thing will be painful. I learned a great deal doing this sculpture. No time for sloppy craft. Thanks again.

Answered on 05/31/2013 by Robert Porreca
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The piece I'm working on is new epoxy with a high gloss surface. Can I paint that kind of surface with the two part poly ?? There is also a lot of texture to the surface that I don't want to sand off. That said, it's high gloss and will the primer stick.?? Thanks Brad for the advice. Bob

Answered on 05/30/2013 by Robert Porreca

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Not sure for sculpture but I definitely used primer for my board

Answered on 05/30/2013 by RICARDO CALLADO

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Yes, you should prime the sculpture. The Primekote will fill any small pin holes and allow you to sand and fair the surface. Use the two part linear urethane products for the final coats. Thee is a flattening additive available if you do not want a high gloss surface. The two part finishes have better UV and abrasion resistance. Bob N.

Answered on 05/31/2013 by ROBERT NEWMAN

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Hey Robert, I have used Primekote when building my boat and had great success as a primer. I know that it works great. My question to you would be this: Do you have confidence in the final coat without using this primer? If so, then no problem. If not, then using primekote probably makes more sense. That's just my logic and no guarantee, but it seems safer than not using the primer. Hope that helps and good luck with your project. Steve.

Answered on 05/30/2013 by STEPHAN SCOTT

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Another thought, you may be able to use Scotch Bright pads to scuff the gloss without removing the texture.

Answered on 05/30/2013 by BRAD HICKMAN

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I'm sure Interlux would say yes but I used the epoxy primer to fill imperfections while finishing a wooden dinghy covered with fiberglass/epoxy. I then sanded enough off to expose bare epoxy over most of it. That was followed with Interlux two part poly and it's stood up well for two years.

Answered on 05/30/2013 by BRAD HICKMAN

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I wouldn't expect the paint to adhere well to a high gloss surface. If a durable finish is needed media blasting may be an alternative to sanding.

Answered on 05/30/2013 by BRAD HICKMAN
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Question

How much of the 2333N solvent can I use for good flow when coating? Interlux recommends a minimum of 25%. I coating a flat deck.

Asked on 04/30/2016 by ROBERT MULHALL

Top Answer

ROBERT: Sorry I am not qualified to give an answer to your question. ITs been a while since I used primekote and I don't remember what mix I used. I liked the product though.

Answered on 04/30/2016 by BRIAN HATFIELD
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Follow the Interlux directions completely. They know. Start with the 25%. Then in low humidity or on a windy or hot day, add solvent and stir in well AS you paint in order to maintain flow. You can tell when you need more solvent by how the paint gets too thick in the paint roller tray, so stay tuned into the flow of the paint and add 2333N right into the tray if needed. Stir it in the tray and continue. It's an art as well as a science. I have found the Interlux products to be pretty forgiving. I have often called the Interlux people and they are the NICEST people in the world and will talk to you forever, telling you all kinds of tricks and ideas and helpful knowledge. I love the Interlux people!

Answered on 04/30/2016 by JULIA ANDERSON

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You'll only need to thin 5-10? in order to get a good flow.

Answered on 04/30/2016 by MATTHEW COOK

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Thanks Matt

Answered on 04/30/2016 by ROBERT MULHALL

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I have found that appox. 25 % works well, you do not want to thin to too much.

Answered on 04/30/2016 by NEWTON COLLYAR

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Depends a lot on temperature and humidity there is a PDF file on Interlux website with guidelines.

Answered on 05/02/2016 by BRANDON BOLIC

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Thanks Julia Do you have their Tech Serv tele#?

Answered on 04/30/2016 by ROBERT MULHALL
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Question

I will be applying Epoxy prime coat on my boat with a roller. What size nap would be best?

Asked on 01/09/2015 by Ted Macklin

Top Answer

A foam roller is the best way to apply, but make sure it is of good quality or it will come apart while using. Remember the smoother the finish the less sanding needed.

Answered on 02/23/2015 by joe pacenti
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thin as you can get

Answered on 03/24/2015 by MATTHEW LYDON

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I used a standard 3/8" nap roller and my hull is beautiful.

Answered on 01/11/2015 by ERIC RAU

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If you are satisfied with the smoothness of your surface go with 1/8", If you need to sand out any imperfections go with 1/4"

Answered on 01/11/2015 by MARK MIZE

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1/8,3/16,1/4? All considered short, which would you use?

Answered on 01/11/2015 by Ted Macklin

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short

Answered on 01/10/2015 by MARK MIZE

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You will want to a use the white foam mini paint rollers. They have no nap because they are smooth foam. The rollers available at Lowes work well. They come in a 4 inch size under the name Whizz or Blue Hawk.

Answered on 01/10/2015 by STEPHEN WIRE
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Question

Can this be tinted with a black two part perfection?

Asked on 09/26/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

I think that is a question best answered by an Interlux pro. Epoxy and urethanes are two different families and mixing them might be disastrous. Primekote is an epoxy based paint. I would just tint it with pigments designed for epoxy. Plenty of them out there. or (I've also done this with really good success) You can make your own carbonblack if you have access to an oxy/acetylene torch. When you direct a pure acetylene flame against a cold piece of 14 or 16 gauge sheet steel, it will turn immediately black with soot. As you fan the flame back and forth it will build up a thick layer, which can be scraped or shaken off. If you bend the piece of metal (6" x 12" works fine) into a shallow "V", the soot falls to the center, like a funnel. That black powder is pure carbon, excellent for tinting. A little goes a long way. DON'T BREATH THE DUST!

Answered on 09/27/2011 by DEAN WILSON
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I don't know. You need to call Interlux customer service and ask them. I found them very helpful, although one guy recommended the wrong product for one of my particular applications. I will probably continue to purchase their products.

Answered on 10/03/2011 by STEFAN STUART

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I have no idea but I'm not so sure it is a god idea to mix epoxy w/ a polyurethane acrylic. I'd bet it would turn out alright but not sure of the sanding properties etc. call interlux

Answered on 09/28/2011 by DAVID DUNBAR

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I am unable to answer his question since I used it untinted. Pierre

Answered on 09/29/2011 by PIERRE BOURGOUIN

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If you're concerned about the white of Epoxy Primekote showing through when you put on the finish coat, don't worry, by the second coat of Jet Black Perfection paint, you can't see the white Epoxy Primekote. I just did it last week. (It will show through the first coat, but you wouldn't want to use just one coat of Perfection topcoat.)

Answered on 09/27/2011 by BRIAN HAKALA

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I would not think so as both of the part A and B's are totally different. The Epoxy Prime Coat part B is the consistency of a jell where the part B of Perfection is a clear thin liquid. The Epoxie Prime Coat part A is quite thick compared to Perfection Part A. Both are excellent products. I would contact Interlux on their web site and ask them. They have been very helpfull in answering my questions for my restoration project.

Answered on 09/27/2011 by DEVERNE DUNNUM

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Personally; I have had success with tinting Primekote with a gelcoat pigment from an Evercoat repair kit.

Answered on 09/30/2011 by GARY MCGONAGLE
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Question

I have a Bayliner 2855 - and I am about to paint everything above the waterline. I was thinking about using the Interlux epoxy primer and paint, I hear great things about it. But, with the built in non skid areas, I am concerned about priming and painting these areas in the cockpit, around the cockpit and on the bow. Too much paint and primer will make the non skid area look messy and not so professional. can I use just the epoxy paint and skip the primer? Or, do you have another product that will work better? Maybe I just use the epoxy primer and paint on the hull, and something else on the rest of the boat? But I am not sure how to blend those areas because of the different products, I have no definitive lines to separate areas, everything flows together above bump guard. I see many people with same issue, and I would like to come up with a solution...or at least options for them and myself. What do you recommend? JonErik Johnson

Asked on 06/17/2012 by JonErik Johnson

Top Answer

By the way, I used the roll and tip application method. I find that this results in a higher gloss than the sprayed on finish when it is properly thined. I also sanded lightly the smooth painted areas with 600 wet paper and then polished with 3m Imperial.

Answered on 06/18/2012 by JIM GRANT
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I used Epoxy Primekote over the nonskid on my Catalina 22. You just have to be careful not to get too much paint in there (I used spray application). For the topcoat, I taped around the nonskid areas and used Perfection + Flattening Agent on the nonskid. Gloss Perfection everywhere else. All spray application looks great. Never used a roll and tip though....

Answered on 06/18/2012 by CARL SALAMONE

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Hi Jim, Thanks very much for the information. I wonder if you're talking about spraying or using the roll-tip method? If I get the non-skid area prepared for primer, then I have to re-sand for topcoat, I am wondering if I should just spray one over the other in a matter of a few hours...I guess using a chemical bond rather that sanding cleaning and applying topcoat a couple days later.. What would you recommend? Thanks ~ JonErik

Answered on 06/18/2012 by JonErik Johnson

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I have used the primer and brightsides topcoat on my Islander 37 nonskid with great results. It is true that the Islanders had a very coarse (knobby) nonskid but I think the primer is thin enough that even a sandpaper textured nonskid would not be made ineffective under two or three coats of primer and paint. I have used the brightsides paint on smaller boats (Lasers and Sunfish) without the primer and it is quite evident that the primer treated surfaces are much more durable.

Answered on 06/18/2012 by JIM GRANT

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Thanks for the information Carl, much appreciated. Did you sand the primer before applying the topcoat? Often when I spray product, I spray one write over the other, after a short cure periods...I was planning on roll and tip, but you peak my interest about spraying. If you didn't sand primer, hows everything holding together? Thanks ~ JonErik

Answered on 06/18/2012 by JonErik Johnson

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I used a cone shaped wire brush in a quarter inch electric drill to prepare my non-skid surface for the primer. Then I applied the Bright Sides within 12 hours or so to get the chemical bond that you mention. It seems to have worked well. At least so far (I am just one year beyond the application). Oh, one other thing, I wiped the surface down with Interlux fiberglass solvent (is it # 202?) after the wire brushing.

Answered on 06/18/2012 by JIM GRANT
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Question

can i add a color addditve to the interlux 404 primer to have a contrast withmy snow white interlux perfection topcoat?

Asked on 03/21/2012 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Isn't primekote a primer? And thus intended to be covered with a colored topcoat? Why would you want to tint the primer? You could certainly call the folks at interlux, but I wouldn't mess with their mix. You'd hate to jeopardize the paint / primer bond by adding some outside component.

Answered on 03/23/2012 by CARL SALAMONE
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I don't know, but I also don't know why you'd want to do that. You can't sand perfection, and I've read you can't touch it up. If the primer were a contrasting color it would take a lot of coats to cover it. If you nicked the perfection, it would stand out like a sore thumb.

Answered on 03/25/2012 by MATT ZAREMSKI

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The hull of my Poke Boat was beginning to craze. Some years ago I pinted it with Interlux epoxy primekote. It has been in the North Crolina summer sun and winter cold for about 4 seasons now and shows no sign of deterioration, I do not know about color addatives. John Boeckel

Answered on 03/24/2012 by JOHN BOECKEL

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Not sure but you can always ask interlux (yachtpaint). But I am fairly certain that they do not offer any additive. However I painted mine snow white and it already contrasted. The second coat of the snow white was more difficult. The primer is really a dull somewhat off white. Hope this helps.

Answered on 03/24/2012 by JENNIFER STOKES

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I think adding color to the prime coat is a good idea to give more depth to the final coat. Epoxy formulations are usually pretty robust and you can usually add a pigment to it without effecting the cure. But just to be safe, add pigment to a small quantity and allow it to cure fully to ensure that the pigment doesn't interfere with the epoxy reaction. The other alternative would be to contact an Interlux technical representative; they might be able to recommend a particular pigment.

Answered on 03/27/2012 by JACK PRICE

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Yes, I do it all the time for my model RC jet plane.

Answered on 03/24/2012 by LOZANO EDDIE
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I want to paint a mast with Interlux perfection.I have sanded the mast down to bare aluminum..Had been painted gold color from the factory. If I use the epoxykote primer and then the Interlux perfection when tyhe primer is tacky will that work or are there other steps I am missing? Thanks Bob Morlock

Asked on 09/28/2011 by Undisclosed

Top Answer

Bob, It is not necessary or desirable to topcoat the primer when the primer is tacky. It is necessary to apply Viny-Lux Primewash 353/354 on the mast as soon as you can after sanding it clean. Allow to dry for 1 hour but not more than 24 hours before applying the Primekote. If you go beyond this 24 hour period you will want to remove what you have applied and start over. After the primer is dry (about 12 hrs) sand it smooth using 220 - 320 sandpaper.

Answered on 09/30/2011 by MICHAEL NIKISHER
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Call up Interlux and ask. I don't recall topping Primekote while it was still wet, but then again I didn't paint spars with it. The Interlux website has their phone number and they have plenty of representatives willing to answer your technical questions... In the end, I don't think you can go wrong with Interlux 2-part paints. Good stuff...

Answered on 09/30/2011 by CARL SALAMONE

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Bob, You will want to wait till the primer coat is dry and sand it prior to applying the Perfection. Interlux even suggests using 2 coats of primer prior to painting. I had good results using this method. I hope that helps. Joel Ogden

Answered on 09/30/2011 by JOEL OGDEN

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Bob Before priming a wipe down with a good degreaser cleaner. After priming Epoxy Primecoat must be sanded before over coating with Perfection. Wait about 12 hours before sanding.

Answered on 09/30/2011 by ANDRE KAHR

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There is a step that you need to take before painting the bare aluminum. Preparing the surface is the most critical step. You need to sand down with the correct grit to create enough rough surface for the primer to attach itself to the metal. I would then wash down the whole pole with interlux solvent to get rid of all sanding dust, grease, and anything else that would prevent good results. Allow solvent to evaporate and then I would use the special interlux primer for metal and not the epoxy primekote. Epoxy primekote (EP) will work, but EP is meant more for use as a primer for the topside of boats. I hope this helps. Rob

Answered on 10/03/2011 by ROBERT WILKINSON

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I would assume you would follow the same instructions for an aluminum mast as a aluminum hull.

Answered on 09/29/2011 by RICHARD BAKER
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Question

Can Prikmekok and Perfection be used on a textured fiberglass Blazer top?

Asked on 12/26/2016 by Michael Quigley

Top Answer

Hi Steve, Yes Primekote (not sure how I managed that typo). Satin is preferred so this may be ideal. Do you foresee any issues with the roll/tip method on the textured fiberglass? Thanks!

Answered on 12/27/2016 by Michael Quigley
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This is a very heavy bodied primer, even when thinned so doesn't roll/tip well (tends to leave ridges that don't smooth out). I found rolling with a smooth foam roller left the smoothest finish which is still an "orange peel". I would think the primer texture would blend in to the existing texture without problem.

Answered on 01/02/2017 by STEVE BEMIS

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I assume that you mean Primekote epoxy primer. If the surface can be roughed up (break any gloss finish) and is well cleaned, the primer should stick well (and thus the top coat). This product adheres very well to old fiberglass. This primer is very hard and does not leave a smooth coat, thus the finish coat will be more satin than gloss as you will not be able to sand the textured surface smooth. If that is acceptable, this should make a very durable finish for your top.

Answered on 12/27/2016 by STEVE BEMIS

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T%he only time I used primekote was on a wood boat with smooth finish.

Answered on 12/27/2016 by WAYNE DICKHAUT

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I'm sorry I do not know

Answered on 01/01/2017 by WILLIAM ELLIS
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